Up next, recap & links

Dig in!

CBS News

Last Updated Nov 16, 2018 5:49 PM EST

Full episodes of "Sunday Morning" are now available to watch on demand on CBSNews.com, CBS.com and CBS All Access, including via Apple TV, Android TV, Roku, Chromecast, Amazon FireTV/FireTV stick and Xbox. The show also streams on CBSN beginning at 9:30 a.m. ET and 1 p.m. ET. 

WE'LL SEE YOU ON THE RADIO: "Sunday Morning" is available to CBS News Radio listeners. 

You can also download the free "Sunday Morning" podcast at iTunes. Now you'll never miss the trumpet!


UP NEXT: NOVEMBER 18

Jane Pauley hosts our annual holiday broadcast devoted to all things epicurean. Check our our show's menu!

(And don't forget to check out our index of recipes and delicious menu suggestions from top chefs, cookbook authors, food bloggers, celebrity cooks, and the editors of Delish.com, including dishes featured on the show.)

     
COVER STORY: 
Breakfast cereals
What happened when food blogger Wil Fulton tried an experiment of eating nothing but breakfast cereal for a week – 82 consecutive bowls? Susan Spencer talks with Fulton about his serial dining on cereal. She also talks with Yale University's Paul Freedman about the history of breakfasts; Dana McNabb, of General Mills, who is bowled over by new varieties of cereal; and registered dietitian Wendy Lopez, who reveals her secret to breakfast smoothies.

For more info:

images-by-nathan-myhrvold-from-the-photography-of-modernist-cuisine-cooking-lab-620.jpg

Images by Nathan Myhrvold from the book, "The Photography of Modernist Cuisine."

Cooking Lab

PHOTOGRAPHY: Feast for the Eyes
Former Microsoft executive Nathan Myhrvold is a man of many talents, from geophysics and space physics to economics – and now, taking eye-popping portraits of food. To get his perfect pictures, which have been featured in art galleries and in a book, "The Photography of Modernist Cuisine," Myhrvold had to design robots to better capture food at the perfect moment. David Pogue reports.

For more info: 

tots-620.jpg
Workman

FOOD FOR THOUGHT TRIPTYCH: Tater Tots
The humble tater tot, that staple of American casseroles and cafeterias, was created in the 1950s when a French fry company envisioned a way to use up all those potato scraps. Today, tater tots are even served in gourmet restaurants. Luke Burbank talks with food blogger Dan Whelan, author of a cookbook devoted to tater tots.

For more info:

hot-pepper-620.jpg

Tempting fate with a really hot pepper.

CBS News

CONDIMENTS: Hot sauce
Hot sauce sales are increasing faster than any other condiment. To get a taste of what people can't get enough of, the hugely popular web series "Hot Ones" features celebrities sampling some really hot foods, and at about 3 million views per episode, the series shows no signs of cooling off. But could correspondent Michelle Miller pass the hot sauce test? She decided to put her mouth where her mouth is.

For more info:

       
BEVERAGES:
 Seltzer
The market for sparkling water is positively bubbling over. Serena Altschul reports.

For more info: 

        
PLASTIC:
 The last straw?
Millions of plastic drinking straws end up as litter, often in the oceans, which is why this summer Seattle became the largest city in America to ban plastic straws in restaurants, to be replaced with compostable or paper options. Tony Dokoupil talks with anti-straw advocates fighting the preponderance of single-use plastic in a throwaway culture, and with representatives of the food service industry in search of alternatives that will be easy for consumers to swallow.

For more info: 

  
ELIXIR:
 Balsamic Vinegar
It's called the "black gold" of Modena, the northern Italian city where balsamic vinegar has been produced for generations – and where some varieties take up to a hundred years to age. Seth Doane dives into the process of creating a product once used as a gift among nobility or as a wedding dowry, and is now a favorite of food connoisseurs the world over.

For more info:

magic-key-lime-pie-ww-norton-620.jpg

Stella Parks' Magic Key Lime Pie.

W.W. Norton

FOOD FOR THOUGHT TRIPTYCH: Key Lime Pie
Was the delicious dessert – so closely associated with the Florida Keys – actually invented in New York City? Nancy Giles investigates a claim Key West residents are calling blasphemy, and samples some competing varieties of Key Lime Pies.

For more info:

pepperoni-roll-620.jpg

Pepperoni Rolls.

CBS News

SNACK: Pepperoni Rolls
In the 1920s, a coal miner from Calabria, Italy who resettled in West Virginia coal country, opened the Country Club Bakery in Fairmont, and introduced the pepperoni roll, a portable meal that miners really dug into. Luke Burbank explains the pepperoni pride West Virginians have for their delicious, utilitarian snack.

For more info:

       
PALATE:
 Tastemaker
As the director of Product and Process Development at the Oregon State University's Food Innovation Center, Sarah Masoni uses her uniquely-qualified taste buds as a "food designer." Lee Cowan reports on someone with most exquisite taste (buds).

For more info:

chrissy-teigen-john-legend-and-rita-braver-in-kitchen-620.jpg

Chrissy Teigen and husband John Legend in the kitchen with correspondent Rita Braver. 

CBS News

SUNDAY PROFILE: Chrissy Teigen
Rita Braver goes into the kitchen with social media star and bestselling cookbook author Chrissy Teigen, and her husband, music superstar John Legend.

For more info:

      
CUISINE: 
The Sioux Chef
Chef Sean Sherman, who belongs to the Oglala Lakota tribe, spent a couple of decades cooking in fancy kitchens around Minneapolis before deciding to apply what he knew to native foods. He is on a mission to celebrate and showcase native cuisine with "The Sioux Chef's Indigenous Kitchen," which won this year's James Beard Award for Best American Cookbook. Martha Teichner reports.

For more info: 

        
SERVERS:
 Pizza by the deaf
Mozzeria is ranked among the top pizza places in San Francisco, and is one of the first to be entirely owned and operated by people who are deaf. Tracy Smith reports.

For more info:

buena-vista-irish-coffee-620.jpg

Bartender Paul Nolan, at the Buena Vista Café in San Francisco, making up just a few of the quarter-million Irish Coffees they serve each year.

CBS News

FOOD FOR THOUGHT TRIPTYCH: Irish Coffee
The Buena Vista Café, which opened in 1916, is a San Francisco institution. And for more than 40 years, bartender Paul Nolan has been making the same drink that made the Buena Vista famous: the Irish Coffee. He demonstrated for John Blackstone the mixture of coffee, Irish whiskey and heavy cream that has kept locals and tourists coming back again and again.

For more info:

        
COMMENTARY: 
Jim Gaffigan on a favorite topic - Food
Seventy percent of Americans are overweight. Commentator Jim Gaffigan suggests that, really, 30 percent of Americans are just lagging behind the rest of the country.

For more info: 

        
NATURE:
 Turkeys
         


RECAP: NOVEMBER 11

WATCH THE FULL 11/11 EPISODE!

HEADLINES: Deadly wildfires decimate California communities (Video)
Wildfires are still burning across Northern and Southern California, forcing tens of thousands from their homes. The death toll now stands at 25. Jamie Yuccas reports from the Pacific Ocean enclave of Malibu. 

      
COVER STORY: 
Conversion therapy: A debunked practice aimed at "converting" homosexuals | Watch Video
An estimated 700,000 adults in the U.S. have received a controversial treatment known as Reparative or Conversion Therapy, under the belief that homosexuality is caused by nurture, not nature, and can be "cured." 

Erin Moriarty talks with young men and women who had undergone the treatment (voluntarily or at the behest of their families) in order to adhere to their church's teachings; and with Alan Chambers, who was the charismatic director of Exodus International, which promised to convert those with "same-sex attraction."

For more info:

      

FOOD: A slice of Japan: Tokyo's pizza makers | Watch Video
If you're searching for the best Neopolitan pizza in the world, some of the tastiest can be found in Tokyo. Ben Tracy reports.

For more info:

TELEVISION: Ben Stiller on directing the prison-break drama "Escape at Dannemora" | Watch Video
Tony Dokoupil talks with the comic actor-director whose latest project is the Showtime miniseries "Escape at Dannemora," the too-weird-for-real-life story of a pair of convicted murderers who fled a prison in upstate New York in 2015 with the help of a female employee. The mini-series stars Benecio Del Toro, Paul Dano and Patricia Arquette.

For more info:

VETERANS DAY: A World War II veteran's memories of a shot fired | Watch Video
Clarence Smoyer, now 94, was a gunner with the U.S. Army's Third Armored Division who'd come ashore in Normandy three weeks after D-Day, criss-crossed France and Belgium, and in March of 1945 fought to capture the German city of Cologne. There, during a firefight with a German tank, a car rounded a corner and was hit. Katharina Esser, a young girl, was wounded and later died. For years, Smoyer has played that scene (which was caught on film by an Army photographer) over and over, wondering if his shot killed Katarina. Seth Doane traveled with Smoyer to Cologne to revisit the site of the World War II battle, to meet with Katarina's relatives as well as the German soldier who was on the other side of that firefight.

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: "Spearhead: The World War II Odyssey of an American Tank Gunner"

For more info:

       
HARTMAN:
 Reviving a squirrel with CPR (Video)
"Life is life," said 19-year-old Chris Felix, who was desperately trying to revive a young one who'd darted out in front of his car in Brooklyn Park, Minn. The subject of his attention was a squirrel. Steve Hartman talked with Felix and with two police officers who responded to the scene of a unique application of CPR.

BIOGRAPHY: The Who's Roger Daltrey: Music legend, teen cancer warrior | Watch Video
"You'll never make anything of your life, Daltrey": Those words by the school principal who expelled Roger Daltrey for misbehavior at age 15 resonated enough to fuel the young man to one of rock's most prestigious careers: Front man of The Who, star of "Tommy" and "Quadrophenia," fashion icon – and cancer warrior. He talks with Jim Axelrod about his new memoir, "Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite," and about his 30-year mission of aiding hospital wards to deal with teenage cancer patients.

BOOK EXCERPT: Roger Daltrey's "Thanks a Lot Mr. Kibblewhite" (with audio excerpt)

For more info:

REMEMBERING 1968: Richard M. Nixon's election victory | Watch Video
Richard Schlesinger look back at the hard-fought race for the presidency in the turbulent year of 1968, when President Johnson withdrew from seeking re-election, and Richard Nixon – following losses in runs for the White House and the California Governor's Mansion – won the Republican presidential nomination and, ultimately, the presidency. Richard Schlesinger talks with Nixon aide Dwight Chapin and speechwriter Pat Buchanan, and with then-Senator Walter Mondale, about the unpredictable contest between a law-and-order candidate hoping to shed his image as a "loser," and a sitting vice president breaking from his own administration to vow an end to the bombing of North Vietnam.

For more info:

STAGE: Kenneth Lonergan on "The Waverly Gallery" and its personal story of dementia | Watch Video
Serena Altschul interviews the Oscar-winning writer-director ("Manchester by the Sea") about the revival of his play, "The Waverly Gallery," on Broadway, starring Elaine May.

EXTENDED TRANSCRIPT: More from Serena Altschul's interview with Kenneth Lonergan

For more info:

    
NATURE:
 Autumn colors | Watch Extended Video
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Stinson Lake in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Videographer: Carl Mrozek.
        


WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

      

ALMANAC: Historic Route 66 | Watch Video
On November 11, 1926, officials green-lighted plans for the future highway, stretching 2,400 miles from Chicago to Los Angeles, nicknamed the "Mother Road." Jane Pauley reports. 

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Bill Geist travels Route 66, the "Main Street of America" (Video)
It's a storied American highway that traversed 2,400 miles beginning in Chicago, and not ending until it had to, at the Pacific Ocean. Bill Geist gets his kicks on a stretch of the historic Route 66 in New Mexico, riding along with Tom Snyder, author of "The Route 66 Traveler's Guide and Roadside Companion," and talks with Tom LaMance, proprietor of Swap Meet 66 in Prewitt, N.M., in a story originally broadcast on "Sunday Morning" July 28, 1991. 

For more info:

     
CALENDAR:
 Week of November 12 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

        


The Emmy Award-winning "CBS Sunday Morning" is broadcast on CBS Sundays beginning at 9:00 a.m. ET. Executive producer is Rand Morrison.

RECAP: NOVEMBER 4

WATCH THE FULL 11/04 EPISODE!      

COVER STORY: Civics lessons: Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Neil Gorsuch on promoting education in citizenship | Watch Video
Since civics was dropped from school curriculums, awareness of our constitutional government (and our participation in it) has gone downhill. Only about 25% of Americans can name the three branches of government, 10% think that Judge Judy is on the Supreme Court, and only 30% of millennials believe that it's "essential to live in a democracy."

Mo Rocca talks with Supreme Court Associate Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Neil Gorsuch about promoting civics education. Rocca also talks with Eric Liu, who created Citizen University to help cultivate the values of good citizenship; and with Chicago social studies teacher Mary Ellen Daneels, who uses what passes for politics these days as object lessons in how not to be a good citizen.

For more info:

        
ALMANAC:
 Walter Cronkite | Watch Video
On November 4, 1916, legendary CBS Newsman Walter Cronkite was born. Jane Pauley reports.

GALLERY: Walter Cronkite

For more info:

ART: Lisbon street artist Vhils: Scraping and carving art into cityscapes | Watch Video
Instead of a paintbrush, Alexandre Farto uses drills and jackhammers to create large-scale public art that exposes layers of a city's history. Once seen as a vandal known by his tag, Vhils, he has fueled the flourishing street art scene in his native Lisbon, Portugal, where murals have added a colorful touch to the otherwise overlooked or mundane, and he has transformed buildings in cities around the world by exposing layers of history. Seth Doane reports.

GALLERY: Chiseled portraits of street artist Vhils

For more info: 

TELEVISION: "Big Bang Theory" creator Chuck Lorre on his Netflix series, "The Kominsky Method" | Watch Video
Correspondent Tony Dokoupil talks with the producer of such TV hits as "The Big Bang Theory," "Young Sheldon" and "Mom," who discusses his latest streaming show, "The Kominsky Method" also with the series' star Michael Douglas. Lorre also talks about his tough childhood on Long Island and his later-in-life success in TV, and in rewriting his reputation as "The Angriest Man in Television."

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Chuck Lorre on lessons learned from his father
Veteran TV producer Chuck Lorre, noted for creating such comedy hits as "The Big Bang Theory" and "Mom," has extended his support to a health facility, the Venice Family Clinic's Robert Levine Family Health Center, in Venice, Calif. He explained to correspondent Tony Dokoupil why he built the clinic, dedicated to his father: "It's a frightening things to be ill and not know where to go."

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Michael Douglas on finding the humor in getting old
Oscar-winning actor-producer Michael Douglas is stepping into a rare comedic role with the new Netflix series, "The Kominsky Method." Produced by Chuck Lorre, the show is about an aging actor and his aging agent-friend, played by Alan Arkin. Douglas talked with correspondent Tony Dokoupil about why he chose to sign onto working with Lorre and develop his "comedy chops."

To watch a trailer for the new Netflix series "The Kominsky Method" click on the video player below.

The Kominsky Method | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix by Netflix on YouTube

For more info:

       
PASSAGE:
 The killing of "Whitey" Bulger | Watch Video
The former Boston crime boss and FBI informant, jailed in connection with 11 murders and other crimes, was slain in a West Virginia prison. Jane Pauley reports.
      

SEASONS: Photographer "Jeff Foliage," the pied piper of New England's fall colors | Watch Video
Jeff Folger goes by the name "Jeff Foliage," and he REALLY loves fall colors. In New England, where tourists spend around $3 billion over the course of leaf peeping season, he heads off in his red SUV in search of the most beautiful yellows and oranges and shares them with the world. He also shared his search with Conor Knighton.

For more info:

        
MUSIC:
 Max Richter's music to sleep by (Video)
British composer Max Richter's most ambitious work," Sleep," is an eight-hour "lullaby" that is to be heard while tucked into bed. Richter recently performed it under the stars in Los Angeles, at a giant slumber party with 500 guests. Tracy Smith reports.

For more info:

       
HARTMAN:
 Striking a chord for civility in politics (Video)
Zac Mayo and Lucy Rogers are Republican and Democratic candidates aggressively competing for a State House seat in Vermont. But this highly-competitive race took a dramatic turn when the two recently ended a debate by joining together in harmony. Steve Hartman reports. 

SUNDAY PROFILE:  Jeff Goldblum: Living life like a jazz piece | Watch Video
Jeff Goldblum's life is like a jazz piece: his acting improvisational, his style unpredictable. He's made an art of being offbeat, and is this week releasing his first album. Anthony Mason reports.

PREVIEW: Jeff Goldblum made sure his quirkiness "didn't hold me back"

To watch Jeff Goldblum & The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra (featuring Haley Reinhart) perform "My Baby Just Cares For Me," click on the video player below:

Jeff Goldblum & The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra feat. Haley Reinhart - My Baby Just Cares... by JeffGoldblumVEVO on YouTube

For more info:

       
OPINION:
 Jackie Speier on Jim Jones, the Peoples Temple cult, and surviving the Jonestown massacre | Watch Video
In November 1978 Jackie Speier was an attorney on the staff of Congressman Leo Ryan that was investigating human rights abuses by Jim Jones, the leader of the Peoples Temple cult in Guyana. While on a fact-finding mission, Speier was shot five times by Jones' followers, but survived. Some 900 members of the cult did not, victims of a mass murder-suicide. Speier, now a Congresswoman from California, talks about surviving the horror, and how that formative moment changed her. 

For more info: 

  • "Undaunted: Surviving Jonestown, Summoning Courage, and Fighting Back" by Jackie Speier (Little A), in Hardcover, Trade Paperback, eBook and Audio Formats, available via Amazon    

     
MIDTERM ELECTIONS:
 What to watch for | Watch Video
CBS News' director of elections and surveys, Anthony Salvanto, says midterm elections are really the most important one.

For more info:

        
CALENDAR:
 Week of November 5 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

        
NATURE:
 Wolves | Extended Video
We leave you this Sunday Morning among the wolves at Yellowstone National Park. Videographer: Judy Lehmberg.
       

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove on sharing the stage with giants (Video)
Grammy-winning jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove died Saturday, November 3, 2018, at the age of 49. In this profile originally broadcast on "Sunday Morning" September 8, 1991, Hargrove, then 21, talked with correspondent Billy Taylor about maturing as an artist. Taylor also spoke with musician Wynton Marsalis, a mentor of Hargrove's; and with George Wein, who brought Hargrove into a new group called The Jazz Futures, which toured music festivals around the country.

NATURE UP CLOSE: Educating your eyes
A lesson in microclimates and the north-south slope effect.


RECAP: OCTOBER 28

WATCH THE FULL 10/28 EPISODE!

HEADLINES: Gunman kills 11 in Pittsburgh synagogue, yelled "All Jews must die" (VIDEO)
In one of the deadliest attacks on Jewish-Americans in U.S. history, a gunman walked into the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh Saturday and opened fire. In minutes, 11 people were killed. Police say the suspect, who is in custody, yelled that "All Jews must die." David Begnaud reports.

      
COVER STORY:
 The banking crisis 10 years on, and the danger of another crash | Watch Video
In 2008, the banking system was near collapse, the stock market was in free fall, and government officials (it seemed to many) were as clueless as the rest of us. CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger looks back at the housing and banking crisis that almost dragged the world down into another Great Depression, and talks with historian Adam Tooze and Wall Street Journal reporter Gretchen Morgenson about how many of the new rules put into place to protect the system from suffering another meltdown are being diluted.

For more info:

       
ALMANAC:
 The 1858 launch of Macy's | Watch Video
On October 28, 1858, Rowland Hussey Macy opened a small dry goods store in New York City that would grow into a retail giant renowned for parades. Jane Pauley reports. 

For more info:

POSTCARD FROM DENMARK:  Licorice: Love it or hate it | Watch Video
Salty licorice is a favorite Scandinavian treat, and quite different from the "licorice" candy that many Americans are used to eating, which sometimes contains no real licorice at all. 

Conor Knighton visits Copenhagen, where bitter licorice candy has a strong following, and where entrepreneur Johan Bulow's company Lakrids has launched high-end, authentic licorice to discriminating palates around the world.

For more info:

HALLOWEEN: Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" at 200 | Watch Video
Two centuries ago, at a storm-tossed villa in Switzerland owned by Lord Byron, a young girl named Mary Shelley accepted a challenge to write a ghost story, and created what would become one of the most famous names in horror: Frankenstein. Roxana Saberi looks at the creation of Shelley's mythic tale, published in 1818, and what her story of a scientist who harnesses life itself has to teach audiences today.

For more info:

CULTURE: Unmasking the history of blackface | Watch Video
With the recent controversy over Megyn Kelley's remarks in which she questioned why wearing blackface on Halloween was offensive, "Sunday Morning" contributor and WCBS anchor Maurice DuBois looks at the long and complex history of white (and even black) performers painting their faces black. For more than 100 years, minstrel shows were a popular form of entertainment on stage and film, reducing an entire race of people to stereotypes. DuBois speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning cultural critic Margo Jefferson, and with Eric Lott, cultural historian and professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, about the complicated history of a racist theatrical form.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Margo Jefferson on the history of black performers wearing blackface
As a theatrical art form that began in the 19th century, minstrel shows featured white performers wearing blackface to evoke stereotypes. But African-American performers have also worn blackface when taking the stage. In this web exclusive, Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson talks with "Sunday Morning" contributor and WCBS anchor Maurice DuBois about why black performers felt the need to don a black mask.

For more info:

       
PASSAGE: 
Dorcas Reilly, creator of the green bean casserole | Watch Video
This week we learned of the death earlier this month, at age 92, of Dorcas Reilly. A long-time employee of the home economics department at Campbell Soup, Reilly invented the recipe for the "Green Bean Bake" back in 1955. Her combination of green beans, cream of mushroom soup, fried onions, and seasonings was a near-instant hit with homemakers, and is today used by millions each Thanksgiving. 
      

MOVIES: Jonah Hill on directing "Mid90s" | Watch Video
"Mid90s" is about a tight-knit band of skaters growing up and raising hell in mid-'90s Los Angeles.  For first-time director Jonah Hill, who earned Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominations for "Moneyball" and "The Wolf of Wall Street," it's another chance for him to "mess up." He tells Tracy Smith, "I mess up every day. I mess up in a way that makes me human. It's what you do after you mess up that makes you someone worthy, you know?"

To watch a trailer for "Mid90s" click on the video player below.

Mid90s | Official Trailer HD | A24 by A24 on YouTube

For more info:

ADVENTURES:  "The White Darkness": One explorer's obsession with Antarctica | Watch Video
Henry Worsley's lifetime fascination with Antarctic explorers such as Ernest Shackleton, Roald Amundsen and Robert Scott led him to retrace their expeditions in one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. In 2015 Worsley set off yet again to emulate his hero, Shackleton, by embarking on the first solo crossing of the continent. Anthony Mason reports.

For more info:

HALLOWEEN: "Halloween" and the surge in horror films: Why audiences are dying to get their fix of fear | Watch Video
The latest iteration of the horror film "Halloween," a sequel to the 1978 John Carpenter classic, scared up a staggering $77.5 million when it opened last week. Lee Cowan talks with actress Jamie Lee Curtis, who returned to once again face off against the masked Michael Myers, and who admits she doesn't like scary movies!  He also talks with Vulture film critic Jordan Crucchiola about the popularity of horror films; sociologist Margee Kerr, who studies what happens to our brains when we experience fear in the theatre; and with Jason Blum, whose Blumhouse Productions was behind last year's Oscar-winning horror hit "Get Out."

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: How Jamie Lee Curtis was scared off the horror genre
Actress Jamie Lee Curtis, the daughter of the star of "Psycho," was born into horror film royalty, and she earned a place herself when she starred in the original 1978 "Halloween." But as she tells "Sunday Morning" correspondent Lee Cowan, she's not a fan of horror films, and she credits one movie in particular for scaring her off the genre: "The Exorcist."

For more info: 

REMEMBERING 1968: Raised fist: Tommie Smith and his "moment of truth" at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics | Watch Video
One of the 20th century's best-known images is of Tommie Smith and John Carlos on the Olympic medal stand in Mexico City in 1968, their fists raised in protest, taking a stand for civil rights on a world stage. Smith and Carlos would become pariahs to some, heroes to others. Today, some NFL players are modeling their activism, using their platforms to call attention to racial injustice. 

Jim Axelrod talks with Smith; sociologist Harry Edwards, who taught Smith and Carlos at San Jose State, and whose Olympic Project for Human Rights organized athletes to protest; and the Philadelphia Eagles' Michael Bennett and Malcolm Jenkins.

For more info:

       

NATURE: Spiders | Watch Extended Video
A few days before Halloween, "Sunday Morning" shows viewers a spider weaving a web. Videographer: Carl Mrozek. 

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of October 29