Up next, recap & links

Last Updated Jan 5, 2020 10:40 AM EST

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You can also download the free "Sunday Morning" podcast at iTunes. Now you'll never miss the trumpet!


RECAP: DECEMBER 29

WATCH THE FULL DECEMBER 29 EPISODE!

COVER STORY:  The move to upgrade U.S. airports | Watch Video
Consistently ranked the best in the world, Singapore's Changi Airport is one of the busiest, but the crowds aren't complaining about layovers when they have movie theaters, a rooftop pool and hot tub, even a butterfly garden. Yet in the United States, there isn't an airport within the Top 30 of the World's Best Airports, and the average airport is 40 years old. Kris Van Cleave looks at efforts to overhaul existing airports in such cities as Orlando, New Orleans, Chicago, Los Angeles and Salt Lake City, and talks with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo about his ambitious, multi-billion-dollar effort to modernize New York City's notoriously antiquated LaGuardia Airport.

For more info:

       
THE DECADE IN REVIEW:
 The top stories year-to-year | Watch Video
What were some of the biggest news items from each year of the past decade? Lee Cowan reports. 

      
BEVERAGES:
 In Denmark, a quest for new spirits | Watch Video
Seth Doane goes in search of new liquors you didn't know you wanted, including beverages distilled from wild fennel, pansies or pine cones. These new flavors of alcohol are being created by a former chef of Denmark's famed Noma restaurant, at his company Empirical Spirits.

For more info:

       
THE DECADE IN REVIEW:
 Europe, and the reawakening of the Russian bear | Watch Video
During the past 10 years Vladimir Putin was re-elected twice, and will be in office until 2024, at least - and the world outside the Kremlin walls is a different place because of him. Mark Phillips reports.

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Eddie Murphy.  CBS News

SUNDAY PROFILE: Eddie Murphy: "There's nothing like making people laugh" | Watch Video
It's yet another comeback for the former star of "Saturday Night Live," but it may be his biggest, as he gets acclaim for his starring role in the Netflix comedy "Dolemite Is My Name." Tracy Smith reports.

To watch a trailer for "Dolemite Is My Name" click on the video player below:

Dolemite Is My Name | Official Trailer | Netflix by Netflix on YouTube

For more info:

      
THE DECADE IN REVIEW:
 The news from Washington, city of confrontation and disruption | Watch Video
The capital was Ground Zero for a decade of political turbulence. Major Garrett reports.

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CBS News

IN MEMORIAM:  Hail and farewell to those we lost in 2019 } Watch Video
It's a "Sunday Morning" tradition, when we pay tribute to the creative, inspiring and newsworthy men and women who passed away this year, who'd touched our lives in unforgettable ways. Lee Cowan reports. 

     
THE DECADE IN REVIEW:
 Movies | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" looks back at some of the biggest pop culture hits.

      
THE DECADE IN REVIEW:
 Asia, and the challenge of the strongmen | Watch Video
In the Far East, the story of this decade is the story of two men who define not just Asia, but a growing threat to the United States. Barry Petersen reports.

     
THE DECADE IN REVIEW:
 Music | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" looks back at some of the biggest pop culture hits.

       
COMMENTARY:
 Jim Gaffigan on what's wrong with 2020 | Watch Video

      
NATURE:
 Swans at Cayuga Lake (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us among swans a-swimming in one of central New York's Finger Lakes. Videographer: Carl Mrozek
       

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

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Two bighorn males butt heads during the winter rut.

NATURE UP CLOSE: The bighorn sheep of Yellowstone
Domestic sheep-borne disease, reduction of habitat and ranching have all contributed to their decline nationwide, but they continue their fights in the steep canyons of Montana and Wyoming.

RECAP: DECEMBER 22

WATCH THE FULL DECEMBER 22 EPISODE!

COVER STORY:  How the crowdsourcing website GoFundMe is changing charity | Watch Video
In the old days people might have turned to the government or to charities such as churches for help; today the first place many people seem to turn to is GoFundMe, a crowdsourcing website, now almost 10 years old, where anyone can appeal to the public to contribute money for pretty much anything – medical bills, disaster relief, funeral expenses, acts of kindness. "Sunday Morning" Contributor David Pogue examines the acts of good will, and occasional fraud, on crowdsourcing sites, and looks at the economics and transparency of charity via social media.

For more info: 

        
ALMANAC:
 Baldness | Watch Video
On December 22, 1997, the FDA approved Propecia, a once-a-day pill for combating the genetic condition known as male pattern baldness. Jane Pauley reports. 
      

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During the Jewish holiday, eating crispy, fried, slightly oniony potato pancakes represents perseverance, and a little bit of magic.

FOOD:  Behind the Hanukkah tradition of latkes | Watch Video
Why are latkes – crispy, fried, slightly oniony potato pancakes – associated with the Jewish celebration of Hanukkah? The story of the miracle of the oil is anything but simple, as correspondent Martha Teichner notes. She talks with Jewish food historian and cookbook writer Jayne Cohen, and with Niki Russ Federman, a fourth-generation owner of Russ & Daughters, a New York City institution of Jewish food for 105 years.

WEB EXTRA: Classic latke recipes from Jayne Cohen

For more info:

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The composer for more than 1,500 songs, including "White Christmas," "Puttin' on the Ritz" and "God Bless America," was a Jewish immigrant from Russia who lived the quintessential American Dream. CBS News

MUSIC:  Irving Berlin, the quintessential American songwriter | Watch Video
Some of our most cherished holiday songs, including "White Christmas" and "Easter Parade," as well as "God Bless America," were written by the prolific composer-lyricist Irving Berlin (1888-1989), a Jewish immigrant from Russia. Mo Rocca talks about the remarkable life of Berlin, who wrote hundreds of standards, with granddaughter Katherine Swett; Broadway musical director and conductor Andy Einhorn; Josh Perelman, Chief Curator at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia, and ultra-Orthodox singer Shulem Lemmer.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Shulem Lemmer sings "God Bless America"

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Irving Berlin's "Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning"
In 1918 songwriter Irving Berlin, then a U.S. Army draftee, composed a song about one of the most difficult aspects of Army life: the bugler's Reveille. "Sunday Morning" correspondent Mo Rocca sings "Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning" with Broadway musical director Andy Einhorn.

BOOK EXCERPT: "Irving Berlin: New York Genius" by James Kaplan

For more info:

     
HARTMAN:
 Foster father, many times over (Video)
Back in 2001, divorced dad-of-two Lamont Thomas took on a foster kid named Michael Perez. Thomas eventually adopted Perez, who now works as a nurse. Turns out, that was just the beginning. Over the next 15 years Thomas fostered more than 30 kids in Buffalo, New York, adopting five of them. Recently, when a family of five siblings was in danger of being split up, Thomas knew what he had to do. Steve Hartman reports.    

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Jennifer Lopez with CBS News' Tony Dokoupil. CBS News

SUNDAY PROFILE:  Jennifer Lopez on happiness, celebrity, and Oscar buzz | Watch Video
Jennifer Lopez, the celebrated singer-dancer-actress-businesswoman and mom, speaks with "CBS This Morning" co-host Tony Dokoupil about her work in the film "Hustlers"; her upcoming movie, "Marry Me"; her future marriage to baseball great Alex Rodriguez; and what it meant to turn 50 this past year.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Jennifer Lopez on relationships and tabloids in the "Bennifer Era"
Singer and actress Jennifer Lopez talks with CBS News' Tony Dokoupil about the media frenzy over her relationships, in the 1990s, with rapper Sean "Puff Daddy" Combs, and with actor Ben Affleck (to whom she was engaged in 2002), both of which became grist for the gossip mill.

For more info:

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Comedian Jim Gaffigan. CBS News

OPINION: December sucks | Watch Video
Commentator Jim Gaffigan has some thoughts about "the most wonderful time of the year." Spoiler Alert: There are no visions of sugar plums dancing in his head.

For more info: 

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Nativity scenes were created by St. Francis of Assisi in 1223, and today spread their message of faith around the world. CBS News

ART:  Nativity scenes, from the artistic to the living | Watch Video
In 1223, in Italy, St. Francis of Assisi created the very first nativity scene as we know it, to inspire the local townspeople. Meant to mark the birth of Jesus, each nativity is an artistic expression of personal faith. Correspondent Nikki Battiste talks with Professor Eric Barreto of the Princeton Theological Seminary about the history of nativities, and visits the University of Dayton's Marian Library collection of nativities from around the world. She also checks out a living nativity scene in Mount Laurel, N.J.

For more info:

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The Young People's Chorus of New York City performs at Lincoln Center. CBS News

MUSIC: The Young People's Chorus of New York City: Hitting all the right notes
More than 1,700 students participate each year in the program, which extends far beyond just music

For more info:

       
MUSIC:
 Holiday music performance
"Sunday Morning" welcomes the Young People's Chorus of New York City, and Jon Batiste, musical director from "The Late Show Starring Stephen Colbert." 

          
CALENDAR:
 Week of December 23 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Reindeer (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us among the reindeer of Lapland, in northern Finland. Videographer: David Cohen.
      

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

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From 1854 to 1929, 250,000 abandoned or orphaned children were put on trains and taken from East Coast cities to the Midwest and beyond. National Orphan Train Complex Museum and Research Center

"MOBITUARIES": The legacy of the Orphan Train
Mo Rocca shares the story of a largely-forgotten social experiment, begun in the 1850s, in which children were transported from the cities to live in the heartland.   

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Journalist Waad al-Kateab filming in Aleppo, under siege from Syrian government forces, in "For Sama." The film is one of 15 shortlisted for an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary Feature.  Frontline

MOVIES: How to watch Oscar shortlisted documentary features
15 non-fiction films chronicling such subjects as the horrors of war-torn Syria, an epic spaceflight, social justice fights, sustainable farming, and the indefatigable forces of nature, are up for an Academy Award nomination; check out options to stream or watch on demand.

      


RECAP: DECEMBER 15

WATCH THE FULL DECEMBER 15 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Delivering the goods: Drones and robots are making their way to your door | Watch Video
Today, delivery is a bigger business than ever. With online shopping it's estimated the U.S. Postal Service, FedEx and UPS will process, sort and deliver more than two billion packages between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve. Amazon's own fleet of delivery trucks is expected to handle 275 million holiday season shipments. John Blackstone got access to the testing of delivery drones that may replace many of those truck deliveries. And then there are the Kiwibots – four-wheeled robots that navigate sidewalks to bring food to hungry college students in Berkeley, Calif. Blackstone also witnessed something somewhat anachronistic in these times: organic dairy products delivered by a milkman.

For more info:

        
ALMANAC:
 Saving the Leaning Tower of Pisa | Watch Video
On December 15, 2001, one of the world's most recognizable and beloved landmarks reopened to the public after an 11-year renovation aimed at preventing a catastrophe. Jane Pauley reports.

For more info:

ART: For Mouth & Foot Painting Artists, anything really is possible | Watch Video
Lee Cowan introduces us to two amazing artists who paint without hands. They are members of Mouth & Foot Painting Artists, an association of about 800 artists who are empowered through their artistry despite disabilities.

For more info: 

MOVIES: Our fascination with Louisa May Alcott's enduring classic "Little Women" | Watch Video
Correspondent Rita Braver visits the Concord, Mass., home of Louisa May Alcott to explore the story behind her classic novel "Little Women," about the progressive and artistic March sisters. She also talks with director Greta Gerwig and actress Saoirse Ronan about the latest movie version of the beloved tale, and why we're still talking about "Little Women" after 150 years.

To watch a trailer for "Little Women" click on the video player below:

LITTLE WOMEN - Official Trailer (HD) by Sony Pictures Entertainment on YouTube

For more info:

      
PASSAGE:
 Danny Aiello, Pete Frates and Paul Volcker (Video)
"Sunday Morning" remembers three notable individuals who left us this week: Pete Frates, who battled Lou Gehrig's Disease, and who helped inspire the viral ALS Ice Bucket Challenge that raised hundreds of millions for research; Paul Volcker, who fought inflation as chairman of the Federal Reserve during the 1970s and '80s; and actor Danny Aiello, who earned an Oscar nomination for the Spike Lee film "Do the Right Thing." 

RETAIL: As department stories struggle, Nordstrom makes a play in New York City | Watch Video
At a time when department stories are struggling, Nordstrom has just opened its first-ever New York City flagship store. Correspondent Tracy Smith talks about Nordstrom's history and longevity with some of the fourth-generation family members who have been minding the store.

For more info:

       
"MOBITUARIES":
 Mo Rocca's book tour diary (Video)
One way to see the country is to write a book, so you can take a book tour. "Sunday Morning" correspondent Mo Rocca reports on the promotional tour he recently took for his new book, "Mobituaries," based on his popular podcast. 

"MOBITUARIES:" How "Gloria" brought glory to a St. Louis hockey team
Fifteen years after the death of singer Laura Branigan, her '80s pop hit became an unlikely sports anthem for the Stanley Cup-winning Blues.  

You can stream or download the "Mobituaries" podcast "Laura Branigan: Death of a Singer, Life of a Song" free at art19.com.

For more info:

MOVIES:  Harvey Keitel on his uneasy relationship with Hollywood | Watch Video
Hollywood hasn't always considered Harvey Keitel, as he puts it, "bankable." But he's always memorable, in such films as Martin Scorsese's "Mean Streets," "Taxi Driver" and "The Last Temptation of Christ," "Thelma & Louise," "Bugsy" (for which he earned an Academy Award nomination), "Pulp Fiction," and his latest, a reunion with Scorsese in "The Irishman." Keitel talked with "CBS This Morning" co-host Anthony Mason about his journey from Brooklyn and the Marines to being a "really lucky" actor who is not, he contends, a star.

To watch a trailer for "The Irishman" click on the video player below:

The Irishman | Final Trailer | Netflix by Netflix on YouTube

See also: 

'TIS THE SEASON: Holiday gift ideas from Techno Claus | Watch Video
Techno Claus, who looks suspiciously like "Sunday Morning" contributor David Pogue but sounds like no one else, delivers some gift suggestions for those on your holiday list who love gadgets.

        
COMMENTARY:
  Point-Counterpoint: Two views on impeaching the president | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" presents two opinions on the impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump, from New York Times opinion columnist Thomas L. Friedman, and Eliana Johnson, editor-in-chief of the political website Washington Free Beacon.

For more info:

        
CALENDAR:
 Week of December 16 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Big horn sheep in Montana (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us near Gardiner, Montana, where for big horn sheep it's a sometimes challenging mating season. Videographer: Alex Goetz.
        

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

        
TAKE FIVE:
 Arts and events around the U.S. (December 13)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of events this coming week.


RECAP: DECEMBER 8

WATCH THE FULL DECEMBER 8 EPISODE!

HEADLINES: In prisoner swap, Iran and U.S. release detained student, scientist (Video)
After three years in a Tehran prison, Princeton graduate student Xiyue Wang is on his way home, in exchange for Iranian scientist Masoud Soleimani, who'd been arrested in the U.S. last year – part of a prisoner swap arranged between the United States and Iran. Roxana Saberi reports. 

       
COVER STORY:
 Dollar Stores and food deserts | Watch Video
It's the latest struggle between Main Street and corporate America: Dollar General, Dollar Tree and Family Dollar have opened tens of thousands of retail outlets across the U.S., and in many rural areas they are the only game in town. Grocers say these stores have effectively forced them out of business, thereby reducing options for fresh food and produce for miles around. Experts say it is having negative effects on public health, but according to Dollar General it is up to consumers to decide where to shop and what to eat. Special Contributor Allison Aubrey, of National Public Radio, reports.

For more info:

        
ALMANAC:
 A vote against war | Watch Video
On December 8, 1941, the day after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, members of the United States Congress voted unanimously to authorize a declaration of war, with one exception. Jane Pauley reports.

GALLERY: Pearl Harbor, Day of Infamy

For more info: 

ART: Doris Duke's Shangri La | Watch Video
The heiress built a home in Honolulu that was a testament to the cultures she discovered in her 'round-the-world travels. And now it's a museum, the Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design. Conor Knighton reports.

For more info:

SPORTS:  Rob Gronkowski on his physical and mental recovery from football | Watch Video
Reena Ninan profiles the former New England Patriot tight end and sports broadcaster.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Rob Gronkowski on slowing down
Former New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski talks with correspondent Reena Ninan about when he began feeling that he might not be able to physically maintain an NFL career.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Rob Gronkowski on the Patriots' prospects
After nine seasons and three Super Bowl wins, New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski retired from the field earlier this year. Correspondent Reena Ninan asked Gronkowski about the prospects of the Patriots as the regular season winds down and they head toward the playoffs.

For more info: 

       
PASSAGE:
 The merger of CBS and Viacom (Video)
It happened this past week: the merger of CBS with fellow media company Viacom to form a new corporation, ViacomCBS. Jane Pauley reports.

BOOKS: Eugenia Zukerman on keeping her sense of humor and dignity in the face of Alzheimer's | Watch Video
Longtime viewers will recognize Eugenia Zukerman, the internationally-acclaimed flutist, who for more than 20 years covered the arts for "Sunday Morning." But now, Zukerman is opening up to Rita Braver about her battle with Alzheimer's, and how music, writing and humor are helping her cope, as she describes in her book, "Like Falling Through a Cloud: A Lyrical Memoir of Coping With Forgetfulness, Confusion, and a Dreaded Diagnosis."

READ AN EXCERPT: Eugenia Zukerman's "Like Falling Through a Cloud"

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas
Michael Tilson Thomas, music director of the San Francisco Symphony and a recipient of a 2019 Kennedy Center Honor, made his reputation young, stepping in for an ailing conductor mid-concert at age 25. It launched a career that included leading orchestras in Boston, Buffalo, Los Angeles, Vienna and London. In this profile originally broadcast on "Sunday Morning" on December 2, 1984, Thomas talked with correspondent Eugenia Zukerman about his enthusiasm both for the contemporary (like Steve Reich's "Desert Music") and the classics of Beethoven and Gershwin.

For more info:

      
HARTMAN:
 Secret Santa's helpers (Video)
'Tis the season for Steve Hartman to catch up with his old friend "Secret Santa," an anonymous, wealthy businessman who every year travels the country giving out as much as $300 to random strangers. This year he's recruited a few helpers, from the Milwaukee County Transit System, to spread some Yuletide cheer.

MOVIES:  Mel Brooks on the love of his life, Anne Bancroft, and comedy that's not PC | Watch Video
Turner Classic Movies host Ben Mankiewicz sits down with the director and comedy writer, now 93, who opens up about his politically-incorrect films like "Blazing Saddles" and "The Producers," and whether they could be made today; and about his relationship with his soulmate, actress Anne Bancoft, with whom he was married for 41 years until her death in 2005.

For more info:

MUSIC:  Billie Eilish: "Nobody that knows me thinks I'm a dark person"
The 17-year-old singer-songwriter talks with "CBS This Morning" co-host Gayle King about happiness, clinical depression, and the shock of worldwide fame in the wake of her album "When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?," created with her brother, Finneas O'Connell. Recorded in their home studio, it became the best-selling album of the year. She's also nominated for six Grammy Awards, including for Album of the Year and Best New Artist.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Billie Eilish on creating a song
Singer-songwriter Billie Eilish ("Bad Guy") demonstrates for CBS News' Gayle King how she and her brother, Finneas O'Connell, improvise and conjure up songs at their home studio.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell on writing "Bad Guy"
Singer Billie Eilish and her brother, Finneas O'Connell, talk with CBS News' Gayle King about creating their hit song "Bad Guy," which they composed and recorded in the studio they created in his former bedroom.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Billie Eilish on overcoming her "toxic" relationship with her body
Singer-songwriter Billie Eilish talks with "CBS This Morning" co-host Gayle King about the kind of comfort she feels from covering up.

You can stream Billie Eilish's album "When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

For more info:

      

OPINION: Bill Flanagan on the "OK, Boomer" putdown | Watch Video
Last week's commentary by Faith Salie about the millennial generation's way of waving away the opinions, instructions and interference of older people gets a response from an older person. 

"MOBITUARIES": When TV sitcoms died in the "rural purge"
In his podcast Mo Rocca explores how the quest for more urban viewers led to the untimely cancellation of hit shows featuring characters from the sticks.

Download or stream "Mobituaries with Mo Rocca" free at art19.com.

For more info:

      
NATURE:
 Snow in New Hampshire (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to a late autumnal scene near the northern New Hampshire town of Pittsburg. Videographer: Scot Miller.
     

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

        
CALENDAR:
 Week of December 9 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

TAKE FIVE: Arts & events around the U.S. (December 6)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of art openings and events this coming week.
   

NATURE UP CLOSE: Whooping cranes are finally making a comeback
Despite habitat loss and low reproductive rates, the bird's population in North America has increased in recent years, thanks to captive breeding programs and the establishment of a second migratory flock.


RECAP: DECEMBER 1

Guest host: Lee Cowan

WATCH THE FULL DECEMBER 1 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Preparing the next generation of GPS | Watch Video
Originally developed by the U.S. military, the Global Positioning System (GPS) as we now know it became operational in 1995, and has since become vital to nearly every facet of modern life, from our smartphones to the internet and the electrical grid. David Pogue was invited into the Air Force's GPS Master Control Station at Schriever Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo, and visits Lockheed Martin, where a new generation of GPS III satellites is being built. 

For more info:

          
ALMANAC:
 The 1969 draft lottery | Watch Video
As the war in Vietnam raged on and anger about U.S. involvement burned in protests across the country, a lottery was held on December 1, 1969 in order to address perceived inequities in military conscription. Lee Cowan reports.

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CHARITY:
  Alec's mission | Watch Video
You may know Shriners Hospitals for Children because of one very special patient: 17-year-old Alec Cabacungan, who was brought to Shriners because of a rare genetic disorder called Osteogenesis Imperfecta (or brittle bone disease), and who for the past five years has helped spread their mission as the charitable organization's leading spokes-kid. Lee Cowan talked with Cabacungan, who describes his challenges and aspirations, and who makes it all look so easy, while none of it really is.

For more info:

PHOTOGRAPHY: A model family | Watch Video
Bart Baldwin, his wife, Jessica, and their five kids are an uncommon sight in advertisements and fashion shoots: a family of models. Correspondent Serena Altschul visited with the "Baldwin Circus" at a resort near Lake Tahoe, where it was – as it always is – "Take Your Child to Work Day."

For more info: 

     
PASSAGE:
 William Ruckelshaus, John Simon and Donald "Nick" Clifford (Video)
"Sunday Morning" looks back at three notable figures who passed this week, including William Ruckelshaus (remembered from the Watergate era "Saturday Night Massacre"), acerbic theatre and film critic John Simon; and Donald "Nick" Clifford, believed to be the last surviving member of the team that carved Mount Rushmore. Lee Cowan reports.

COMMUNITY: The Cemetery Angel | Watch Video
When the AIDS crisis hit in the 1980s, Ruth Coker Burks – who'd inherited 262 plots in a family cemetery in Hot Springs, Arkansas – became a mother of sorts to countless sons, many abandoned by families and churches because they were suffering from what was called "the gay cancer." Coker Burks became a one-woman AIDS help center: driving patients to appointments, trying to find doctors, drugs, or filling-out death certificates. And in many cases she gave them a final resting place. Seth Doane reports on the woman who has been called "The Cemetery Angel," who gave – and received – so many precious gifts.

For more info:

      
COMMENTARY:
  Faith Salie on the cheeky putdown "OK, Boomer" | Watch Video
For young people who have inherited a world full of rising waters, disappearing species, crippling debt and crumbling democracies, a cheeky retaliatory phrase is more than warranted

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MOVIES: Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce on playing "The Two Popes" | Watch Video
In 2013 the unthinkable happened: a pope resigned, and another became head of the Vatican. For the first time in six centuries, the Catholic Church had two popes. The new film "The Two Popes" imagines what conversations between 85-year-old Pope Benedict (played by Sir Anthony Hopkins) and Pope Francis (played by Jonathan Pryce) would have sounded like – and since both pontiffs disagreed on most everything, not all of that conversation is polite. Correspondent Tracy Smith talked with Hopkins and Pryce about their star-making movies, faith, and friendship.

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ON BROADWAY: Alanis Morissette's "Jagged Little Pill" inspires a Broadway musicalWatch Video
Alanis Morissette's 1995 album, "Jagged Little Pill," became the unexpected soundtrack of a generation of young women who'd realized they didn't really fit into the box society was trying to put them in. It won five Grammys and sold more than 33 million copies worldwide, making it one of the most successful albums of all time. And now, 25 years later, "Jagged Little Pill" has been turned into a Broadway musical, with an original story by Oscar-winner Diablo Cody ("Juno"). Correspondent Luke Burbank talked with Cody, and with Morissette, who explains the joys of growing older, and of never shying away from confronting the big issues of life.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Alanis Morissette on "You Oughta Know"
Singer-songwriter Alanis Morissette's landmark 1995 album "Jagged Little Pill" contained an explosive feminist anthem, "You Oughta Know." In this web exclusive Morissette talked with correspondent Luke Burbank about the song, which is now featured in a new Broadway musical inspired by her music.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Diablo Cody on writing the musical "Jagged Little Pill"
Oscar-winning screenwriter Diablo Cody ("Juno") was tasked with crafting a story for the new musical "Jagged Little Pill," which was inspired by the songs of Alanis Morissette. In this web exclusive Cody talked with correspondent Luke Burbank about her experience working in the "foreign" world of Broadway.

You can stream the original Broadway cast album of "Jagged Little Pill" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

For more info:

       
CALENDAR: Week of December 2 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Lee Cowan reports.

       
NATURE:
 Bear vs. fish (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes you to Taylor Creek in the Lake Tahoe Basin, where bears are fishing. Videographer: Derek Reich.

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

      

NATURE UP CLOSE: A living museum in the Sonora Desert
The Arizona Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson highlights hundreds of native species, from flowering cactus to larcenous birds.
              


RECAP: NOVEMBER 24

Jane Pauley hosts our annual holiday broadcast devoted to all things epicurean. Check out our show's menu!

(And don't forget to check out our index of recipes and delicious menu suggestions from top chefs, cookbook authors, food bloggers, celebrity cooks, the editors of Bon Appetit magazine, and "Sunday Morning" staffers, including dishes featured on the show.)

WATCH THE FULL NOVEMBER 24 EPISODE!

COVER STORY:  You are what you eat? How nutrition may affect brain health | Watch Video
A key element in brain health is nutrition, say researchers who believe the number one factor that you have control over in terms of your mental health is at the end of your fork. Susan Spencer talks with Dr. Drew Ramsey, a psychiatrist who "prescribes" a healthier diet in order to combat depression; Samantha Elkrief, a trained chef and wellness coach; and neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi, for whom brain scans reveal the differences in brain structure between those who eat a Mediterranean diet and those who consume standard Western fare. 

BOOK EXCERPT: "Brain Food": Comparing brains on different diets

For more info: 

DINING OUT: Food halls: Redesigning the dining experience | Watch Video
When Americans actually left their houses to shop, food courts would sate their appetites at shopping malls. But now, with brick-and-mortar retail stores closing, food halls, offering a wide variety of ethnic cuisines and non-corporate dining choices, have become destinations in themselves, with hundreds opening up around the country. Faith Salie looks at the changing face of dining, as former industrial spaces, a shuttered race track, and even shipping containers are being refitted into food stalls. A world of flavors under one roof. 

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FRUITS:  Breadfruit: Rediscovering the tropical fruit | Watch Video
Typically green and scaly on the outside, white and smooth like squash on the inside, breadfruit is a starchy member of the fig family that's similar in taste to a potato, and smells like fresh baked bread when cooked. But you're not likely to come across it in most American grocery stores. Conor Knighton explores the history of breadfruit, a "canoe plant" first brought to Hawaii centuries ago by Polynesian explorers, and which today is used in everything from tacos and stews, to pizza, bagels, and even vodka.

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KITCHENWARE: Tupperware: A blast from the past | Watch Video
Successfully marketed at parties by armies of entrepreneurial women, the "burping" plastic bowls popularized after World War II are being forced to redefine themselves in a new era - even via pop-up stores. Martha Teichner reports.

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ENTRÉE:  Danny Trejo: A tough actor with a soft spot for food | Watch Video
Known as a tough actor, Danny Trejo has a soft spot for food, as a restaurateur. Luke Burbank reports on Trejo's taco empire.

For more info:

  • "Trejo's Tacos: Recipes and Stories from L.A.: A Cookbook" by Danny Trejo with Hugh Garvey (Clarkson Potter), in Hardcover and eBook formats, available April 2020; preorder via Amazon
  • trejostacos.com

VIDEO: Mukbang: Watch what they eat! | Watch Video
In the hallowed hall of food fads, what in the world could be weirder than mukbang? A Korean term, mukbang refers to YouTube videos of people eating, and talking about their meal. And millions of people are hungrily watching. David Pogue reports.

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DINE OUT: A taste of India on the interstate | Watch Video
At the Akal truck stop in Laramie, Wyoming, the Indian food that Mintu Pandher and his staff are cooking up in a small kitchen attracts truckers and locals from miles around, with food they can't find anywhere else along Interstate 80. Turns out there's money in all those smells of turmeric, coriander, and other spices rarely used in truck stop cuisine: his cafe is a hit, especially with the changing face of trucking, since nearly 19% of long-haul truck drivers in America are now immigrants. Jim Axelrod reports.  

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BEVERAGES:
  Aging well: The allure of vintage spirits | Watch Video
While renovating his Keyport, New Jersey house this past September, Ron Lewert found a stash of Gilbey's Dry Gin – 12 bottles – hidden in a crawlspace in the roof. The gin was almost as old as the house, built more than 90 years ago, and as correspondent Lee Cowan found out, old spirits are, indeed, rising from the dead, becoming a popular ingredient at auctions and "speakeasies" catering to pre-Prohibition Era tastes.

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DINING OUT: The lesson from Jon Bon Jovi's JBJ Soul Kitchens: "Find your good, and do it." | Watch Video
Rocker Jon Bon Jovi made a career out of filling stadiums with cheering fans, and now he's using that appeal – and his own financial resources – to help feed the homeless and needy through his JBJ Soul Kitchen restaurants. Tracy Smith reports. 

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CHEF: Jacques Pépin, the chefs' chef | Watch Video
With four decades on television and two dozen cookbooks, chef Jacques Pépin has been influencing American tastes and techniques for generations. Jane Pauley talks with Pépin about his culinary education, which began in Lyon, France at age 13. Seventy years later, he still loves giving cooking demonstrations, with an emphasis on the basics being the foundation good, great or masterful cooking.

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GASTROPODS:  Snails, the original slow food | Watch Video
On the North Shore of Long Island is the largest snail farm in the country. Taylor Knapp, who calls himself a snail wrangler, delivers his fresh snails to some of New York City's finest restaurants, like Frenchette, where chef Lee Hanson uses them to make brouillade escargots. Mo Rocca reports.

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"MOBITUARIES": 
Reconstruction and the death of representation | Watch Video
The years following Emancipation, in which freed slaves were finally allowed to participate in our democracy, was a time of unparalleled hope that later generations depicted as a failure. Mo Rocca looks at the misunderstood years of Reconstruction in his latest episode of his podcast "Mobituaries." To hear this and other episodes, go to art19.com


NATURE: Turkeys in the Great Smoky Mountains (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us this Thanksgiving week among wild turkeys keeping a low profile in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Videographer: Scott Miller.

Our sign-off music today: "Come on-a My House" performed by Della Reese:

Della Reese - Come-On-A-My House (USA) by micmic1431968 on YouTube

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of November 25 | Watch Video
From a monumental birthday for Tina Turner to Thanksgiving, "Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports. 

brown-bear-with-chum-salmon-sherri-obrien-620.jpg
A fish species that spends most all of its life in the ocean has a vital role in a forest ecosystem.

NATURE UP CLOSE: Salmon, a keystone species in the Pacific Northwest
How a species of fish that spends most all of its life in the ocean has a vital role in a forest ecosystem       

        
TAKE FIVE:
 Arts & events around the U.S. (November 15)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of art openings and events this week.


TAKE FIVE: Food events around the U.S. (November 22)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of food events this holiday week.


RECAP: NOVEMBER 17

WATCH THE FULL NOVEMBER 17 EPISODE!

COVER STORY:  Rescuing art: The creativity and science of restoration | Watch Video
The painstaking work of art restoration is often done in a studio or a lab, removing decades of dulling dirt and dust, or repairing works that has been damaged, always with the aim of helping art – meant to stand the test of time – keep time at bay. Lee Cowan reports.

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SPORTS: Women in the ring: Female boxers | Watch Video
Heather Hardy and Amanda Serrano, two of the biggest names in women's boxing, have known each other for years. But recently, when they climbed into the ring at the Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York City, they weren't thinking about their friendship. They were thinking about combat. Correspondent Kelefa Sanneh talked with exemplars of a sport that still receives much less recognition than men's boxing, and where prizefighting comes without much of a prize.

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ART:  For the birds: Illustrator David Sibley | Watch Video
David Sibley has been called the most important illustrator of birds since John James Audubon or Roger Torey Petersen, and his "Sibley Guides to Birds" have sold more than two million copies. Rita Braver finds out how the bird fancier became one of the most respected and successful chroniclers of bird life. 

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: David Sibley: Growing up as a birder
Illustrator David Sibley, famed for the bestselling "Sibley Guide to Birds," talks with correspondent Rita Braver about his youthful interest in bird-watching, and how being the son of a noted ornithologist, Yale professor Fred Sibley, led to his career.

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PASSAGE:
 The Jane Pauley Community Health Center (Video)
It happened this past Friday: a 10th anniversary celebration for an Indianapolis-area health center . . . named for a graduate of local Warren Central High School. Today, the Jane Pauley Community Health Center operates 22 clinics in five counties, with nearly 94,000 patient visits last year.

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BOOKS:  Master of intrigue John le Carré on his latest villain: Brexit | Watch Video
John le Carré is 88 now, and 25 novels, 10 films and 6 TV adaptations later, he has new villains: The people trying to take Britain out of the European Union. The author talks with Mark Phillips about his latest novel of intrigue, "Agent Running in the Field," which examines how the British public is being "bamboozled by people with private interests" in the push for Brexit.

BOOK AND AUDIO EXCERPT: "Agent Running in the Field" by John le Carré

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: John le Carré reads from "Agent Running in the Field"
What lies within the heart of a secret agent, and how would he convince others to betray their countries for the benefit of his own? In this web exclusive, author John le Carré reads a passage from his latest novel, "Agent Running in the Field," to elucidate the motives and morals of secretive figures in the intelligence world.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: The secret world of John le Carré (Video)
The putative end of the Cold War didn't mark the end for master spy storyteller John le Carré, who continued to write thrilling bestsellers of international intrigue and duplicity. Mark Phillips talked with the writer about how his "secret world" hadn't changed all that much, and with London tailor Douglas Hayward, who served as a source of inspiration for the British expat who finds himself in the middle of a plot in crime-and drug-ridden Panama City, in le Carré's novel, "The Tailor of Panama." Originally broadcast on "CBS Sunday Morning" November 17, 1996.

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FOOD: Ikarian honey: The secret ingredient to long life? | Watch Video
On this Greek island, where life expectancy is among the highest in the world, residents credit the local honey. Jonathan Vigliotti reports.

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"Mobituaries": "Drink to Thomas Paine!" 00:57

"MOBITUARIES": Thomas Paine and the death of a forgotten founding father
Mo Rocca pulls out all the stops to honor the Revolutionary author whose pamphlets lit the fuse for American independence but who remains little-remembered today. 

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JOURNALISM:  Tom Brokaw: Yesterday, "Today" and tomorrow | Watch Video
For five decades journalist and storyteller Tom Brokaw served as a pillar of NBC News, reporting from such hotspots as Tiananmen Square and the Berlin Wall. His 1998 book, "The Greatest Generation," became a bestselling testimonial to the men and women who selflessly fought, and won, World War II. Then, six years ago he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Brokaw talks about his fight to overcome bone marrow cancer with "Sunday Morning" host Jane Pauley, his former colleague from the "Today" show.

PODCAST: Listen to an extended interview between Jane Pauley and Tom Brokaw

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SUNDAY JOURNAL:
 Reince Priebus: "A Warning" author Anonymous is "dishonorable" | Watch Video
President Trump's first chief of staff calls the secretive "senior Trump administration official" behind a new tell-all book a "coward." Major Garrett reports. 

For more info: 

  • "A Warning" by Anonymous (Twelve), in Hardcover, eBook and Audio formats, available via Amazon

SPORTS: Renee Powell: A driving force in golfWatch Video
At the Clearview Golf Course in East Canton, Ohio – the first golf course in the U.S. designed, built, owned and operated by an African-American – women are taking part in Clearview Hope, the first golf program for female military veterans in America. It was begun by Renee Powellthe second African-American to play on the LPGA Tour. She and her brother, groundskeeper Larry Powell, talked with CBS News special correspondent James Brown about how their father, a World War II veteran, turned a former dairy farm into an 18-hole public course, and how her family did not let roadblocks stand in the way of their love for the sport.

For more info:

      
CALENDAR:
 Week of November 18 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

      
NATURE:
 Bison in South Dakota (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Custer State Park, in Custer, South Dakota, where the buffalo roam. Videographer: Charles Schultz.

For more info: 

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

      
ALMANAC: 
The U.S. Capitol building opens | Watch Video
On November 17, 1800, the United States Congress met for the very first time in the as-yet-unfinished Capitol building in Washington, D.C. Jane Pauley reports. 

       
GALLERY: 
The fall of the Berlin Wall
Looking back at the wall that once divided Germany during the Cold War, and its collapse in November 1989.      

        
TAKE FIVE:
 Arts & events around the U.S. (November 15)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of art openings and events this week.


RECAP: NOVEMBER 10: 

WATCH THE FULL NOVEMBER 10 EPISODE!

COVER STORY:  With deepest sympathy: The complications of coping with grief | Watch Video
Dealing with death is simply part of living life, as every person who dies leaves behind loved ones who must face a grieving process. And while most of us eventually adapt to a "new normal," one in 10 endures what researchers calls "complicated grief." For them the acute phase of grief never lets up. Susan Spencer investigates the study of grief, and how a website, Modern Loss, is sharing personal stories of grief, loss and coping from around the world, sometimes with unexpected twists.

BOOK EXCERPT: "Modern Loss: Candid Conversation About Grief. Beginners Welcome."
Rebecca Soffer writes that, when communing about grief in a social media era, no "like" can replace a conversation, or a hug, or shared double martinis.

BOOK EXCERPT: "Black Widow" by Leslie Gray Streeter
The Palm Beach Post columnist recounts the terrible night when her life was turned upside-down, and her unplanned, forced accommodation to the newly-dominant emotion of grief.

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ALMANAC:
 "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" | Watch Video
On November 10, 1871 the Scottish explorer who'd disappeared in Africa while searching for the source of the Nile was found by a reporter for the New York Herald. Jane Pauley reports. 
      

MOVIES:  How two "Forrest Gump" actors served their country | Watch Video
Two actors who appeared in the 1994 film "Forrest Gump," which featured harrowing scenes of combat in Vietnam and the anguish of veterans upon their return home, would themselves serve the military after the movie wrapped. Gary Sinise, who played Lt. Dan, formed the Gary Sinise Foundation to aid returning servicemembers, while Michael Humphreys, who played Tom Hanks' character as a child, signed up for the Army and was deployed for 18 months in Anbar Province, Iraq. Twenty-five years after the film's release, Mark Strassmann talked with Sinise and Humphreys about the film's impact on their lives.

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"MOBITUARIES": Marlene Dietrich goes to war | Watch Video
During World War II the German-born Hollywood film star fought for her adopted country. 

To hear the full "Mobituaries" audiobook excerpt "Marlene Dietrich Goes to War," click here  

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TELEVISION: "The Crown" | Watch Video
Time marches on, even for royalty. As the hit Netflix series "The Crown" returns for its third season, the young and glamorous Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, played to critical acclaim by Claire Foy and Matt Smith, are out; the more mature Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies are in. Mark Phillips spent time on the set with Colman and Helena Bonham Carter (who co-stars as Princess Margaret), and with series creator and writer Peter Morgan, to discuss the show about a family in extraordinary circumstances.

To watch a trailer for Season 3 of "The Crown" click on the video player below: 

The Crown Season 3 | Official Trailer | Netflix by Netflix on YouTube

For more info:

  • "The Crown" (Netflix) – Season 3 debuts November 17       

FOOD:  "The Joy of Cooking" and its recipe for success | Watch Video
Irma Rombauer wrote and published the first "Joy of Cooking" in 1931. Updating "Joy" has been a family tradition, passed down through the generations. Serena Altschul talks with Irma's great-grandson, John Becker, who is co-author, along with wife Megan Scott, of the latest edition of one of the most successful cookbooks ever published.

Recipe from "Joy of Cooking": Mushroom Confit
The latest edition of the bestselling cookbook offers the perfect spread or addition to pasta.

Recipe from "Joy of Cooking": Roasted Mushroom Lasagne
From the latest edition of the bestselling cookbook.

Recipes from "Joy of Cooking": Brownies
Classic Brownies Cockaigne, and more modern Fudgy Brownies, from the latest edition of the bestselling cookbook.

For more info:

        
PASSAGE: 
In memoriam (Video)
"Sunday Morning" remembers Beatles photographer Robert Freeman, Maria Perego, creator of the puppet character Topo Gigio, and Robert Norris, who became famous in advertising as "The Marlboro Man," even though he never smoked.

      

HARTMAN: Heaven sent (Video)
During her 35 years as a nurse, Lori Wood has been a hero many times over. At the time Jonathan Pinkard, a 27-year-old autistic man, met Wood, doctors in Newnan, Ga., told him he had heart failure and needed a heart transplant. Being homeless, there was no way he could get on a transplant list – until Wood took matters in hand. Steve Hartman reports.

      
MOVIES:
 "Ford v. Ferrari": Matt Damon and Christian Bale on a story of competition and friendship | Watch Video
In the 1960s, Ford Motor Company embarked on building a supercar that could beat the Italian automaker Ferrari at one of the world's most prestigious car races, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. That effort, and the stories of the car designer and driver behind it, is now told in the new movie "Ford v. Ferrari." Tracy Smith talks with stars Matt Damon (who plays Carroll Shelby, the automotive artist hired to defeat Ferrari) and Christian Bale (who plays legendary driver Ken Miles) about the quest to create a finely-tuned weapon of speed.

AUDIO EXTRA: Download or stream our podcast featuring Tracy Smith's extended interview with Matt Damon and Christian Bale!

To watch a trailer for "Ford v. Ferrari" click on the video player below: 

FORD v FERRARI | Official Trailer 2 [HD] | 20th Century FOX by 20th Century Fox on YouTube

For more info:

ART:  "We, the People": Mary Whyte's portraits of 50 veterans from 50 states | Watch Video
For her project titled "We the People," artist Mary Whyte set out to paint 50 veterans from 50 states. The men and women included in the exhibition, now at the City Gallery in Charleston, S.C., are as diverse as the nation they served. Martha Teichner reports.

GALLERY: Mary Whyte's portraits of veterans

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POLITICS: Nikki Haley: I was asked by Cabinet members to take sides against the president | Watch Video
Norah O'Donnell talks with the former South Carolina governor and Trump administration Ambassador to the United Nations. 

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Nikki Haley: Trump isn't the only one guilty of inflammatory rhetoric
The former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, addresses President Donald Trump's use of the term "invasion" when speaking of immigrants.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Nikki Haley: We should have the backs of the Kurds
The former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, addresses President Donald Trump's abandonment of the Kurds in Syria who have been key in America's fight against ISIS, and the purpose of deploying U.S. troops overseas.

For more info:

     
NATURE:
 Salmon (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to the North Fork of the Clearwater River in north-central Idaho, where Kokanee Salmon are running. Videographer: Hank Heusinkveld.

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

      
CALENDAR:
 Week of November 11 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

     
GALLERY: 
The fall of the Berlin Wall
Looking back at the wall that once divided Germany during the Cold War, and its collapse in November 1989.

      

TAKE FIVE: Arts & events around the U.S. (November 8)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of art openings and events this week.


RECAP: NOVEMBER 3

WATCH THE FULL NOVEMBER 3 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: The armless archer | Watch Video
One of the top-ranked archers in the country is 36-year-old Matt Stutzman of Fairfield, Iowa, who has medaled in a sport that many would have thought beyond his reach: he was born without arms. Lee Cowan finds out how, with a simple bow and arrow, a man who just wanted to provide for his family became an inspiration.

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ART:  Enter the immersive art world of Meow Wolf | Watch Video
What is Meow Wolf? An art collective founded in Santa Fe, N.M., whose name came from words picked out of a hat, and which puts on immersive exhibitions that tantalize audiences with vivid visuals and storytelling that is magical, mysterious, or just downright weird. Their latest exhibit, called "The House of Eternal Return," is contained in a former bowling alley purchased by one of the group's benefactors, "Game of Thrones" author George R.R. Martin. Conor Knighton reports.

For more info:

       
PASSAGE:
 Cystic fibrosis drug therapy (Video)
It happened this past week: word of a new drug therapy that offers hope to the roughly 30,000 Americans who suffer from cystic fibrosis. Jane Pauley reports.

BOOKS: How Mitch Albom found Chika | Watch Video
Ten years ago, when a terrible earthquake devastated Haiti, killing hundreds of thousands and leaving millions more injured and homeless, author Mitch Albom ("Tuesdays With Morrie") traveled to Port-au-Prince to try to help, and found children huddling in an orphanage. And while many people say they will come back to a disaster site and never do, Albom did, time and again, bringing volunteers from Detroit who rebuilt the orphanage and built a new school. But Albom also brought back home something precious: a little girl, Chika, who helped create a family with Albom and his wife, Janine Sabino. She would also inspire his latest book, "Finding Chika." Nancy Giles reports.

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DEATH: Obit writers: Deadly serious about their craft | Watch Video
At ObitCon, members of the Society of Professional Obituary Writers talk about the privilege of honoring lives well-lived. Mo Rocca reports on the annual gathering of obit writers, and their awards ceremony, where they hand out the Grimmys. 

MOBITUARIES: Remembering first brother Billy Carter
In Mo Rocca's latest podcast, President Jimmy Carter shares candid memories of his brother, who gained notoriety in the 1970s and became "the most famous person in our family"

GALLERY: Notable Deaths in 2019

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HARTMAN:
 No deeper love (Video)
Deep in New York's Adirondack Mountains, family and friends gathered to help 59-year-old Kris Scharoun-DeForge pay tribute to her remarkable husband, Paul. They'd met in 1993, and after dating five years, became one of the first couples in the world with Down syndrome to get married. Steve Hartman reports on a remarkable marriage. 

JUSTICE: A protest against racism, and a $31.5M defamation award | Watch Video
In 2016 a student from Oberlin College in Ohio, trying to use a fake ID to buy wine, was taken into custody by police. The arrest prompted demonstrations that accused the store's owners of being racist. And while the student was found guilty, the store owners sued Oberlin, claiming the college's support for the student demonstrators caused reputational damage. Senior contributor Ted Koppel examines how the jury's award in the case may undermine freedom of speech on college campuses, and the perhaps unanswerable question:  What is the fair price for a family's good name? 

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MUSIC: Jeff Lynne, the reluctant rock star | Watch Video
The co-founder of the '70s rock band Electric Light Orchestra, which had such hits as "Livin' Thing," "Showdown," "Mr. Blue Sky" and "Evil Woman," is back, with Jeff Lynne's ELO. David Pogue sits down with Lynne, the singer, songwriter and producer who's also brought his touch to such artists as George Harrison, Tom Petty and Aerosmith.

You can stream the Jeff Lynne's ELO album "From Out of Nowhere" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK: David Pogue on interviewing a musical idol
A privilege of being a "Sunday Morning" correspondent is getting to meet songwriter/singer/producer Jeff Lynne, co-founder of the rock band Electric Light Orchestra.  

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OPINION: Joseph Ricketts on free enterprise, the engine that drives America | Watch Video
Despite a pending recession, the founder of Ameritrade says the country's strength continues to come from job opportunities created by new businesses.

BOOK EXCERPT: "The Harder You Work, the Luckier You Get" by Joe Ricketts

For more info:

      
NATURE:
 Bat swarm (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to the Bracken Cave Preserve outside San Antonio, Texas, home to more than 15 million Mexican free-tailed bats. Videographer: Ken Kerbs.  
      

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

         
ALMANAC:
 S.O.S. | Watch Video
On November 3, 1906, an international conference approved the three-letter message as the radio telegraph distress call for ships at sea. Jane Pauley reports. 

         
CALENDAR:
 Week of November 4 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.
         

SUNSPOTS: Hunting ghosts at New York City's Morris-Jumel Mansion | Watch Video
Built in 1765, the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Manhattan served as a war room for Gen. George Washington and a home for Aaron Burr – and something may still live there. On this Halloween, "Sunday Morning" producer Sara Kugel visited, and talked with paranormal investigator Vincent Carbone, who explains the eerie "electronic voice phenomenon" that made itself known in a recording made in Burr's bedroom. 

For more info:

       
TAKE FIVE:
 Arts & events around the U.S. (November 1)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of art openings and events this week.
        


RECAP: OCTOBER 27

WATCH THE FULL OCTOBER 27 EPISODE!

COVER STORY:  Our fascination with Tyrannosaurus Rex | Watch Video
Why are we captivated with a creature that hasn't existed on Earth for about 66 million years? Martha Teichner visits the American Museum of Natural History in New York's T. rex exhibit, and accompanies a University of Kansas paleontology team as they dig for Tyrannosaurus Rex bones in Jordan, Mont.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Meet a "Jurassic World Live" dinosaur

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Hugh Murphy's humorous T-Rex
What if a Tyrannosaurus Rex could be brought to life today? Cartoonist Hugh Murphy (who is also a practicing dentist in Raleigh, N.C.) has published three books exploring how confounding life might be for a creature with such short arms. Martha Teichner reports.

GALLERY: Why it's tough to be a dinosaur
Cartoonist Hugh Murphy's series of books details the tribulations modern life poses for a Tyrannosaurus Rex with very short arms.

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ALMANAC:
 Captain Cook | Watch Video
On October 27, 1728, the British naval officer and explorer was born in northern England. Jane Pauley reports.
        

ART: Gargoyles and grotesques get their closeupWatch Video
Grimacing, gaping, grinning, mischievous creatures perched close to Heaven, they invite us, dare us, to raise our gaze. Faith Salie gets an up-close look at the gargoyles and grotesques that decorate the upper reaches of the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., from the menacing (Medusa, Darth Vader) to the cheeky (a crooked politician – perfect for the nation's capital!). Salie also talks with the Cathedral's head mason, Joe Alonso; with stone carver Walter S. Arnold and sculptor Jay Hall Carpenter; and with gargoyle expert Janetta Rebold Benton about the history of these church denizens.

See also:

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MUSIC:  The life of Prince, revealed in "The Beautiful Ones"Watch Video
Begun just months before his death, in 2016, a memoir by the legendary singer-songwriter Prince is now being published. Jamie Yuccas reports on how the manuscript by Prince Rogers Nelson came to light, and talks with editor Dan Piepenbring, who helped Prince tell his story, including how the people in Prince's life made him the artist he was. Yuccas also talks with representatives of Prince's estate about the vault of previously-unreleased music that is now being made public.

You can stream the Prince album "Originals" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

For more info:

        
POSTCARD FROM JAPAN:
 One shrinking Japanese town's plan: Give away houses for freeWatch Video
As the Japanese populace shrinks and ages, and young people leave the suburbs and rural areas for cities, more and more communities are becoming "ghost towns," with abandoned houses and declining populations. The municipality of Okutama, on the outskirts of Tokyo, has come up with a novel solution: Give away houses to young families for free. Ben Tracy talks with the man in charge of giving away homes, who isn't averse to playing Cupid to get people to move into his shrinking town.

       
HARTMAN:
 A friend in need (Video)
Life has its ups and downs, but rarely do you see a swing as dramatically as what 66-year-old Coy Fetherson just went through. Recently homeless in Austin Texas, a photo in a local newspaper alerted old friends he hadn't seen in years. Steve Hartman reports.

MUSIC:  How scary music makes movies scarierWatch Video
Why does certain music make scary movies even scarier? David Pogue talks with horror movie composers Michael Abels ("Get Out," "Us") and Michelle DiBucci ("Wendigo"), and with neuroscientist Anthony Lacagnina, who studies the effect of music on the brain, to find out how the scores of such classics as "Psycho" and "The Shining" work their magic.

For more info:

        
PASSAGE:
 Nikon Small World photo winners (VIDEO)
This week the winning pictures in the annual Nikon Small World photomicrography competition were announced.

HALLOWEEN:  Taking the wraps off candy | Watch Video
For the past century, the Mars Wrigley company, one of the largest privately-held companies in the world, has been making candy treats that have filled kids' Halloween stashes. Luke Burbank visited the company's Oak Park, Ill., factory where millions of fun-sized candy bars are made each day.

For more info:

HISTORY: Time will tell: Historians on judging presidential leadership | Watch Video
Mo Rocca talks with historians Doris Kearns Goodwin and David McCullough, and with David Rubenstein, author of "The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians," about judgments made of presidents of the past (and the present).

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin on "cutting the past some slack"
In this web exclusive Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, the author of several books on presidents (including Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Lyndon Baines Johnson), talks with correspondent Mo Rocca about living with dead presidents, and how we should judge the leaders of the past by their imperfections as well as their accomplishments.

For more info:

       
NATURE:
 Spider webs (Extended Video)
For Halloween, "Sunday Morning" takes us to Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida, where spiders are weaving their webs. Videographer: Charles Schultz.

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

         
CALENDAR:
 Week of October 28 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

TAKE FIVE: Arts & events around the U.S. (October 25)
Check out the "Sunday Morning" listings of arts openings and events this week.

lettherightonein.jpg
The Swedish vampire film "Let the Right One In." Magnet

GALLERY: 50 essential horror films for Halloween
Check our guide to the most unforgettable cinematic shockers.
         


RECAP: OCTOBER 20

WATCH THE FULL OCTOBER 20 EPISODE!

      
COVER STORY:
 The Herbert Hoover you didn't know | Watch Video
Herbert Hoover had been president for less than a year when the Crash of 1929 initiated the Great Depression, an epochal event in American history that would place his name near the bottom of presidential rankings. But the engineer and business magnate, who made several fortunes in his 20s, is also remembered as a great humanitarian for feeding several million starving Belgians during World War I, and for introducing a variety of innovations in American life, from standardized traffic lights to milk bottles. Mo Rocca examines Hoover's remarkable rise (from humble beginnings to the White House) and his remarkable fall.

For more info:

        
ALMANAC:
 Margaret Dumont | Watch Video
On October 20, 1882, the film and stage actress, the favorite comic foil of the Marx Brothers, was born. Jane Pauley reports. 

For more info:

ART:  Helen Frankenthaler: An artist lost in the moment | Watch Video
The beauty of Provincetown, Massachusetts inspired many works by one of the most renowned American artists of the 20th century: Helen Frankenthaler. A series of works that the abstract expressionist painter created on Cape Cod is on view in an exhibit called "Abstract Climates," at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, Long Island. Correspondent Rita Braver talked with co-curator Elizabeth Smith, and with the artist's step-daughter, Lise Motherwell, about Frankenthaler's unique style.

For more info:

FROM THE ARCHIVES: From 1984: Abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler (VIDEO)
In this report originally broadcast on "CBS Sunday Morning" September 16, 1984, correspondent Eugenia Zuckerman met with one of the most important of American post-war painters, Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011), as she prepared for an exhibition of her abstract expressionist work at the André Emmerich Gallery in New York City, and talked about her artistic process, which she described as "a kind of magic."

MUSIC:  How Janis Joplin became America's first female rock star | Watch Video
A new book about the rock and blues singer presents a portrait of a gifted, complex and challenging artist who became an iconic trailblazer during her 27 years. Anthony Mason talks with music journalist Holly George-Warren about her biography, "Janis: Her Life and Music."

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: "Janis: Her Life and Music"

WEB EXTRA: Listen to 12 essential Janis Joplin tracks
Music journalist Holly George-Warren offers "Sunday Morning" a roster of Joplin hits – well-known and rare – that capture the brilliance and power of the rock and blues singer.

For more info:

         

PASSAGE: Bill Macy and Elijah Cummings | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" remembers an actor famed for playing the long-suffering TV husband of Bea Arthur in the '70s sitcom "Maude," and a fiery orator of the House and untiring champion of civil rights. Jane Pauley also remembers two veterans of CBS News: Chris Myers, our Los Angeles deputy bureau chief, and Chris Raine, a video editor in our London bureau.


GAMES:
  Escapism: The immersive adventure of escape rooms | Watch Video
Correspondents David Pogue, Martha Teichner and Nancy Giles, along with "Sunday Morning" intern Cory Peeler, face a difficult challenge: Find their way out of a room before a bomb goes off! It's just one of many examples of the big business in escape rooms – immersive adventures in which people are entertained by being trapped.

For more info:

        
HARTMAN:
 What's in a name? (VIDEO)
At a small university near Birmingham, Alabama, Steve Hartman found a big guy: 6'8", 310-pound senior offensive lineman George Grimwade, a dominating force on the Samford Bulldog football team, who used his time on the playing field to send a very special message to his stepdad.       

        
MOVIES:
  Martin Scorsese, Al Pacino and Robert De Niro on "The Irishman" | Watch Video
Director Martin Scorsese and actors Al Pacino and Robert De Niro talked with correspondent Lee Cowan about their first-ever collaboration, "The Irishman," the true story of Frank Sheeran, a hit man for a Philadelphia crime family. The mob epic, which spans decades, was created using cutting-edge technology to "de-age" its cast, as it traces a story of loyalty and corruption, and explores the fate of Teamsters Union president Jimmy Hoffa.

For more info:

  • "The Irishman" opens in select theatres on November 1, before streaming on Netflix beginning November 27.

To watch a trailer for "The Irishman" click on the video player below:

The Irishman | Official Teaser by Netflix on YouTube

       

OPINION:  Skateboarding: Why should youth be wasted on the young? | Watch Video
Contributor Luke Burbank recently took up a new hobby – skateboarding – and while inside he felt like a kid again, outside he remained very much a middle-aged man, with a sense of balance that could only be described as intermittent.

For more info:

      
HISTORY:
 Tracing the remarkable life's path of Harriet Tubman | Watch Video
Harriet Tubman, a tiny woman who could neither read nor write, pulled off superheroine-like exploits in the years before the Civil War. With the help of the Underground Railroad, she not only escaped from a Maryland plantation to freedom in the North, she went back, 13 times over 10 years, to guide more than 70 enslaved people to freedom. And during the war, she became the first American woman to lead troops into battle, near Beaufort, S.C. Martha Teichner visits historic sites that were part of Tubman's remarkable life story, and with actress Cynthia Erivo, who plays the iconic figure in a new biopic, "Harriet."

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: British actress Cynthia Erivo on playing American icon Harriet Tubman
The Tony Award-winning British actress Cynthia Erivo, who portrays abolitionist Harriet Tubman in the new movie "Harriet," talks with correspondent Martha Teichner about criticism she has faced as a non-American being cast as a legendary American woman.

For more info:

To watch a trailer for "Harriet" click on the video player below.

HARRIET | Official Trailer | In Theaters November 1st by Focus Features on YouTube

        

CALENDAR: Week of October 21 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

         
NATURE:
 Butterflies (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to a gathering of cabbage butterflies near Bridgeton, New Jersey. Videographer: Jeff Reisly.

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

when-i-let-go-of-what-i-am-i-become-what-i-might-be-and-handsome-amy-sherald-620-tall.jpg
"When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be (Self-imagined atlas)" (2018), left, and "Handsome" (2019), by Amy Sherald. © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

SUNSPOTS: Amy Sherald's "everyday people" | Watch Video
An exhibition in New York City by the artist whose painting of Michelle Obama became a sensation features portraits of everyday models, and captures the private, inner lives of African Americans. "Sunday Morning" producer Sara Kugel reports.

NATIONAL PASTA DAY (10/17): Geometry and pasta (VIDEO)
People may think more about the taste of pasta than its shape. Architects and chefs, however, find much beauty in the design of different pastas. Faith Salie talks with George Legendra, author of "Pasta by Design," and London chef Jacob Kennedy, co-author of "The Geometry of Pasta." Originally broadcast November 18, 2012.

NATURE UP CLOSE: The pros and cons of introducing non-native fish species
Anglers may welcome fighters like trout, but stocking lakes and streams with non-native fish can have disastrous impacts on other organisms.
       


RECAP: OCTOBER 13

WATCH THE FULL OCTOBER 13 EPISODE!

      
COVER STORY:
 Transgender youth: Navigating gender identity in adolescence | Watch Video
In 2014 Rita Braver met with children grappling with a very grown-up issue: gender identity. Five years later she met up again with them to see how their lives have progressed.

For more info:

      
ALMANAC:
 America's first aerial photograph | Watch Video
On October 13, 1860, James Wallace Black took a picture of Boston from a balloon 1,200 feet in the air. Jane Pauley reports.

For more info:

PUBLIC SPACES: The Idle: An oasis in the midst of traffic | Watch Video
Tom Battista is the kind of guy who tends to veer off the beaten path – specifically, a small triangle of land wedged between traffic-choked freeways in Indianapolis. There, Battista has created a quiet oasis, a park for people to sit and gaze at drivers stuck in traffic. Luke Burbank reports on the inspiration behind the tiny park known as the Idle.

For more info: 

       
SUNDAY MORNING INDEX:
 Pets
Researchers say people who own dogs have a 24 percent lower risk of early death than people who don't own dogs. [Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.]

TELEVISION: Mariska Hargitay, the avenging angel of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" | Watch Video
Michelle Miller sits down the actress, star of TV's long-running "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," whose off-screen work is to promote victim's rights.

For more info:

       
BROADCASTING:
 Sports announcer Jason Benetti on being a voice for those with cerebral palsy | Watch Video
Beginning this year radio and television sports broadcaster Jason Benetti became the fulltime play-by-play announcer for the Chicago White Sox. Benetti, who has cerebral palsy, spoke with Scott Simon, of National Public Radio, about his remarkable career.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Jason Benetti: Everyone has an ability to be life-changing to others
Chicago radio and TV sports broadcaster Jason Benetti talks with NPR's Scott Simon about how, growing up, he was "oblivious" in some ways to his cerebral palsy, and about the reactions of other people to his CP.

For more info:

      
HARTMAN:
 Ending retirement with cupcakes (Video)
Once Ray Boutwell worked in a bakery. But retirement wasn't sitting well with him, so at age 93 he started again from scratch, opening up his own business for the first time: Ray's Boozy Cupcakes, in Voorhees Township, New Jersey. (Yes, some cupcakes are actually infused with alcohol.) And now his big gamble is paying off, as Steve Hartman discovered. 

For more info: 

MUSIC:  Elton John: Addiction "nearly destroyed my soul" | Watch Video
The singer who is on a farewell world tour has just released his first official autobiography, "Me: Elton John." Tracy Smith reports.

For more info:

       
MILEPOST: 
Marathon
A Kenyan runner broke the two-hour barrier for running a marathon yesterday. Three-time Olympic medalist Eliud Kipchoge ran it in 1 hour, 59 minutes and 40 seconds. 

              
OPINION:
 Jim Gaffigan on his in-laws | Watch Video
The comedian considers his other "family," assigned to him legally.

For more info: 

POLITICS:  Andrew Yang on creating a "trickle-up" economy | Watch Video
Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang will be among the 12 contenders on stage at the Democratic Party debate in Westerville, Ohio, on October 15. Nicholas Thompson, the editor-in-chief of Wired, sits down with the entrepreneur to talk about his campaign.

For more info: 

         
CALENDAR:
 Week of October 14 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

      
NATURE:
 Yellowstone geysers (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to view the geysers at Yellowstone National Park. Videographer: David Bhagat. 

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

NATURE UP CLOSE: The massive decline of bird populations
The U.S. and Canada have lost 29% of their birds over the past 50 years, as species are subjected to habitat loss, pesticides, predation, and climate change.
      


RECAP: OCTOBER 6

WATCH THE FULL OCTOBER 6 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Pete Hamill on Jimmy Breslin and the heralded world of beat reporters | Watch Video
Since 2004, some 1,800 metropolitan and community newspapers have gone out of business or merged – a challenging environment for journalists whose job is to report the life's blood of a city. Two "princes of print" who'd gotten their starts in the heyday of New York City metropolitan newspapers were Jimmy Breslin (who died in 2017) and Pete Hamill, both of whom are the subject of a new HBO documentary, "Breslin and Hamill: Deadline Artists." Hamill talked with Tony Dokoupil about working the city beat, and offered advice for journalists of today.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Newspaper man Jimmy Breslin (VIDEO)
Used to be every big city newspaper had a guy who knew what was what, to whom both cops and crooks wanted to tell their stories. A guy like Jimmy Breslin, as New York as the A train. Harry Smith walks through some of the veteran newspaper reporter and author's biggest stories from the underworld, and visits what was John Gotti's favorite Queens social club, now a grooming salon for dogs, in this profile originally broadcast on "Sunday Morning" on March 9, 2008.

For more info:

         
ALMANAC:
 Fallout shelters | Watch Video
On October 6, 1961, President Kennedy wrote to Civil Defense officials urging construction of fallout shelters to protect against radiation from a nuclear attack. Jane Pauley reports.

ART:  NYC's Museum of Modern Art gets a makeover | Watch Video
Serena Altschul takes a tour of New York City's Museum of Modern Art, which is soon to reopen following a major $450 million renovation, with more than 40,000 square feet of new gallery and performance space, and about a thousand additional pieces of art on display. Altschul talks with museum director Glenn Lowry, curator Sarah Suzuki, and architect Liz Diller, of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, about the museum's expansion.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Morley Safer on the Museum of Modern Art's expansion (Video)
In 2004 the Museum of Modern Art in New York City underwent a meticulous expansion and facelift. CBS News' Morley Safer talked with MoMA's director Glenn Lowry, chief curator of painting and sculpture John Elderfield, and architect Yoshio Taniguchi about the museum's transformation – a perfect marriage of architecture and art, in a report originally broadcast on "CBS Sunday Morning" November 14, 2004.

For more info:

      
PASSAGE:
 Diahann Carroll and Jessye Norman (Video)
"Sunday Morning" remembers two notable artists who left us this week: Tony-winning and Oscar-nominated actress Diahann Carroll, and international opera star Jessye Norman.

      
BUSINESS:
 Corporations and guns: How companies are reshaping the gun control debate | Watch Video
While Congress and the White House have resisted laws to increase restrictions on gun purchases, companies like Walmart and Dick's Sporting Goods are now taking the lead in curtailing sales of firearms or ammunition. Lee Cowan reports.

POSTCARD FROM DENMARK: A spiraling walk above the trees | Watch Video
An hour from the Danish capital city of Copenhagen, visitors at an unusual spiraling walkway, meant to both stand out and blend in with surrounding the forest, can soar 14 stories high, above the canopy of trees, to experience a rare view of nature. Seth Doane talked with Jesper Mathiesen, a former Danish Navy SEAL behind the project, called Camp Adventure, and with architect Tue Foged whose team designed the unique observation tower.

For more info:

       
HARTMAN:
 A surprising funeral announcement (Video)
To most people, Dennis Valstad of Ripon, Wis., who passed away a few months ago, seemed to be a man of modest means. But he'd actually amassed a small fortune. And his will contained a surprising provision that no one who attended his funeral could have seen coming. Steve Hartman reports.

      
MILEPOST:
 The hard hat

SUNDAY PROFILE: Presenting Mitzi Gaynor | Watch Video
Mitzi Gaynor has been playing with audiences for over 70 years now, in movies, then on TV and in Vegas. The singer, dancer and actress talks with Mo Rocca about being wooed by Howard Hughes, starring in the film version of "South Pacific," and sharing the "Ed Sullivan Show" stage with The Beatles.

For more info:

      
OPINION:
 Andy Borowitz: How to be a successful failure | Watch Video
The New Yorker humorist behind "The Borowitz Report" offers his take on how you, too, can be great at something, by not being great at something.

For more info:

MUSIC:  Lizzo: "I feel like a master" | Watch Video
She's been compared to some of the greatest singers of our time. Her real name is Melissa Jefferson, but she's known by her childhood nickname, Lizzo, and you might say this has been her year. Last month alone she had the number one song, "Truth Hurts"; appeared on the cover of Elle magazine; and stole the show on MTV's biggest night. She also costars in the hit Jennifer Lopez film, "Hustlers." Yet, the 31-year-old described her career as "the slowest build of all time." Lizzo sat down with Tracy Smith to discuss overcoming bouts of poverty, homelessness, and crippling self-doubt, and how her high school band teacher gave her the focus she needed to make her mark.

WEB EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: Watch an extended version of Tracy Smith's profile of Lizzo

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Read a transcript of an extended conversation with Lizzo, or watch the special video

You can stream Lizzo's album "Cuz I Love You" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

For more info:

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of October 7 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Hawaii's Akaka Falls (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Akaka Falls State Park on the Big Island of Hawaii. Videographer: Jamie McDonald. 

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

black-bear-vs-sandhill-crane-verne-lehmberg-620.jpg
The sandhill crane, ready to pounce on the black bear.

NATURE UP CLOSE: Sandhill cranes vs. a black bear
An encounter in Yellowstone National Park results in an unexpected outcome. 

RECAP: SEPTEMBER 29

WATCH THE FULL SEPTEMBER 29 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: The great electric scooter backlash | Watch Video
The electric scooters have become a familiar sight around the country – simple to operate, they give users the freedom of a car and the fresh air of a bicycle, for the price of taking the bus. So, why have so many cities banned them? David Pogue reports.

For more info:

       
THE NEW SEASON:
 Movies | Watch Video 
From Variety: Five highly-anticipated films of the fall season.

HISTORY: The Smithsonian's Lonnie Bunch: A passion for history | Watch Video
Lonnie Bunch is enamored of American history. Last June Bunch was named Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, which he calls "part of the glue that holds the country together." Bunch is in charge of 19 museums, 21 libraries, the National Zoo, 7,000 employees, and a budget of $1.5 billion – and is on a mission that he believes is nothing short of monumental. Bunch, who oversaw the creation of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, talked with CBS News national correspondent Chip Reid about the personal connections he has to some of most precious objects in the Smithsonian's collections.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Five objects: Extended commentary by the Smithsonian's Lonnie Bunch about his personal attachments to artifacts in the collection

BOOK EXCERPT: "A Fool's Errand" by Lonnie G. Bunch III

For more info:

      
LIFE:
 Jim Gaffigan and Jeannie Gaffigan on making sense of life | Watch Video
The comedian and his better half (also his co-writer and the co-creator of their five children) talk about how their lives changed in the face of a frightening medical emergency, and how humor helped get them through it.

For more info:

      
PASSAGE:
 Ventriloquist Jimmie Nelson (Video)
       

ART: Glass cast in sand (Video)
Marlene Rose's glass art is seductive and ethereal. But to get the unique shapes of her works, she uses an ancient yet rare technique called sand casting. She demonstrated her art to correspondent Lee Cowan, and created her own glistening version of the "Sunday Morning" sun.

For more info:

       
HARTMAN: 
On her toes (Video)
Young children's passion for ballet often burns out, and even professional ballerinas are often done by 30. But Steve Hartman found a remarkable exception, in Dallas, Texas, where 79-year-old Suzelle Poole is still at the barre, teaching at the Royale Ballet Dance Academy.

For more info: 

SUNDAY PROFILE: Olivia Newton-John on finding joy in a life with cancer | Watch Video
Actress, author and singer Olivia Newton-John, 71, is battling breast cancer for the third time. "I'm happy. I'm lucky. I'm grateful. I have much to live for. And I intend to keep on living it," she tells "CBS This Morning" co-host Gayle King in an emotional interview at her Los Angeles home. Newton-John talks about her diagnosis two years ago and how, while the pain can be unbearable, her spirit remains unshakable.

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: "Don't Stop Believin': A Memoir" by Olivia Newton-John

For more info:

      

THE NEW SEASON: Art | Watch Video
From The Art Newspaper: Five highly-anticipated exhibitions at museums around the U.S. this fall season.  

      

Q&A: Hillary Rodham Clinton & Chelsea Clinton on "Gutsy Women" and Trump | Watch Video 
A new book, "The Book of Gutsy Women" (published by CBS' Simon and Schuster), tells the stories of 103 inspirational women, from Amelia Earhart, Harriet Tubman and Eleanor Roosevelt, to Billie Jean King, Aly Raisman and Jackie Joyner-Kersee. The book was co-authored by a mother and daughter, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, who talk with Jane Pauley about who has inspired them. The former Secretary of State also talks with Pauley about President Trump, whom she calls "a clear and present danger" to the rule of law, and says that she supports an impeachment inquiry.

READ AN EXCERPT: "The Book of Gutsy Women"

For more info:

       

NATURE: Trout (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to the John Muir Wilderness in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, awash with trout. Videographer: Scot Miller.

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 


CALENDAR:
 Week of September 30 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports. 

NATURE UP CLOSE: Sandhill cranes vs. a black bear
An encounter in Yellowstone National Park results in an unexpected outcome. 
    


RECAP: SEPTEMBER 22

WATCH THE FULL SEPTEMBER 22 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: The mysteries of "God Friended Me" | Watch Video
The hit TV show about a "God" account on Facebook pointing to people who need help has spoken to the spiritual journeys of its cast in surprising and challenging ways. Correspondent Michelle Miller talks with stars Brandon Micheal Hall, Joe Morton, Javicia Leslie, Violett Beane and Suraj Sharma about the show's stories of faith, trust and love that have caused them to examine their own beliefs. 

For more info:

       
ALMANAC:
 The L.A. freeways "Stack" | Watch Video
On September 22, 1953, the Four-Level Interchange design opened, allowing drivers in 32 lanes to switch from one freeway to another without ever having to cross another lane of traffic. Jane Pauley reports. 

POSTCARD FROM PATAGONIA: Creating Patagonia National Park | Watch Video
Located in the southern tip of Chile, Patagonia National Park is more than half-a-million acres of mountains and valleys, glaciers and grasslands, winding rivers and wild guanacos – and it is part of the largest private land donation in history. Conor Knighton trekked the wilds of the park with Kristine Tompkins, former CEO of the clothing company Patagonia, whose non-profit, Tompkins Conservation, handed over this park to the Chilean government to preserve its wild-ness for generations to come. It's a dream that has been two-and-a-half decades in the making, and the culmination of a remarkable love story.

For more info:

MUSIC: John Williams on reworking the classics – his own | Watch Video
The composer-conductor is one of America's most celebrated musical talents – the best-known creator of music for films. He has written the scores for such revered classics as "Jaws," "Star Wars," "Superman," and "Schindler's List," and is returning to the "Star Wars" universe with the upcoming "Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker." Correspondent Tracy Smith talks with John Williams, and with violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter, who collaborated with the composer on a new album of pieces for violin and orchestra adapted from his film scores.

EXTENDED TRANSCRIPT: John Williams on Spielberg, "Star Wars," and the power of music

Anne-Sophie Mutter and John Williams recordin... 02:15

GALLERY WITH AUDIO: The classic film scores of John Williams
Listen to audio samples of some of the composer's best scores!

For more info:

     
PASSAGE:
 The Cars' Ric Ocasek and journalist Cokie Roberts | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" remembers the rock guitarist and lead vocalist for the 1970s-'80s rock band, and the pioneering broadcast journalist for NPR and ABC. Jane Pauley reports. 

MOVIES: Return to "Downton Abbey" | Watch Video
Elizabeth Palmer visits the castle famous as the location of Downton Abbey, and talks to some of the actors in the new movie inspired by the hit TV show.

PREVIEW VIDEO: Julian Fellowes on the "Downton Abbey" movie: "A logistical nightmare"
The creator of "Downton Abbey," Julian Fellowes, talks with correspondent Elizabeth Palmer about bringing the cast back together for a new theatrical feature.

To watch a trailer for "Downton Abbey" click on the video player below:

DOWNTON ABBEY - Official Trailer [HD] - In Theaters September 20 by Focus Features on YouTube

For more info:

       
HARTMAN:
 Going the distance (Video)
A lot of police officers go above and beyond the call of duty. But few officers have gone further out of their way than Sgt. Jeff Turney of the Glendale, Arizona Police Department, who responded to a call about a 94-year-old preparing to drive to an assisted living facility all the way in Florida in a most remarkable fashion. Steve Hartman reports.

MOVIES: Renée Zellweger on playing Judy Garland | Watch Video
Lee Cowan interviews the Oscar-winning actress, who stars as Judy Garland struggling to make a career comeback in London after years of battling addiction in the new biopic "Judy."

To watch a trailer for "Judy" click on the video player below:

JUDY | Official Teaser Trailer by LD Entertainment on YouTube

For more info:

MUSIC: Mark Knopfler: Music is "a bit of an obsession" | Watch Video
Mark Knopfler says he can't think of anything good about fame, which is one reason he dissolved his hit band, Dire Straits, when they were at the peak of their success. But he continues to make music, and as he wraps a tour of America, Knopfler sat down with Anthony Mason to talk about the music he has written, for himself and others, and why he calls it his obsession.

You can stream Mark Knopfler's album "Down the Road Wherever" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

For more info:

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of September 23 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Florida (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Myakaa River State Park in Sarasota, Florida. Videographer: Doug Jensen.

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

clarence-smoyer-medal-ceremony.jpg
World War II veteran Clarence Smoyer is awarded the Bronze Star, Sept. 18, 2019. CBS News

UPDATE: WWII vet Clarence Smoyer awarded Bronze Star (VIDEO)
On March 6, 1945 Clarence Smoyer, a Pershing tank gunner with the U.S. Army's 3rd Armored Division, helped to capture Cologne, Germany's third-largest city. His bravery under fire was chronicled in a recent book, "Spearhead," and he was interviewed by Seth Doane for "Sunday Morning" in November 2018. On September 18, 2019, Smoyer, now 96, was belatedly awarded the Bronze Star in a ceremony at the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.

NATURE UP CLOSE: Life in the Humboldt Penguin National Reserve
A wide range of organisms, from previously-unknown fish to plants that aren't true plants, can be found in the marine reserve off the Chilean coast.


RECAP: SEPTEMBER 15

WATCH THE FULL SEPTEMBER 15 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: How we have failed our teachers | Watch Video
Since 1996 inflation-adjusted pay for a public school teacher has actually fallen, and nationwide about one in five teachers has a second job to make ends meet. Fury over those flat and falling wages helped spark a movement over the past 18 months in which tens of thousands of teachers, in conservative red states and liberal blue cities, walked off the job. But while hundreds of teachers have brought their fight for better working conditions to the political world by running for public office, others have been forced to give up the profession they love. "CBS This Morning" co-host Tony Dokoupil reports. 

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ALMANAC:
 Marilyn Monroe's billowing dress | Watch Video
On September 15, 1954, the actress' wardrobe malfunction over a New York City subway grate was filmed for a celebrated scene in "The Seven Year Itch" - footage that would be deemed unusable. Jane Pauley reports. 

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ANTIQUES: Colonial Williamsburg furniture conservator Leroy Graves | Watch Video
At Colonial Williamsburg, getting the period details just right is a mission for furniture conservator Leroy Graves. Over the past three decades he has revolutionized how museums preserve and protect upholstered antiques, despite this son of sharecroppers having had virtually no formal education. A detective of sorts when it comes to repairing and refitting antiques, Graves' work is featured in an ongoing exhibition called "Upholstery CSI." Martha Teichner reports.

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MUSIC: The Backstreet Boys: "We will never turn our backs on each other" | Watch Video
If you were alive in the '90s, you probably know the phenomenon called the Backstreet Boys – a frenzy some compared to Beatlemania. With more than 130 million records sold worldwide, they remain the bestselling boy band of all time. And the boys – now men – are back with their biggest world tour in 18 years, and a new album, "DNA." Tracy Smith talked with Nick Carter, Howie Dorough, A.J. McLean, Brian Littrell and Kevin Richardson, who have never turned their backs on each other.

You can stream the Backstreet Boys album "DNA" by clicking on the embed below (Free Spotify registration required to hear the tracks in full):

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PUBLISHING: Inside the pages, and websites, of New York Magazine | Watch Video
In 1968 editor Clay Felker, a Midwesterner whose nose was pressed against the windows of the rich and famous in New York City, and Milton Glaser, a Jewish, Bronx-born art director, launched New York, a national magazine with the sensibility of its namesake city – energetic, and full of ambition and attitude. The winner of 48 National Magazine Awards, it's outlasted dozens of rival publications, in part through its successful spinoff websites, including Intelligencer, Grub Street and Vulture. "Sunday Morning" contributor (and New York online writer) David Pogue talks with Glaser, former editor-in-chief Adam Moss, and new editor-in-chief David Haskell about New York's special brand of journalism.

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HARTMAN:
 The little patriot (Video)
Six-year-old Finn Daly, of West Hartford, Connecticut, who has Down syndrome and is also autistic, finds comfort and contentment in a sight most of us take for granted: a fluttering flag. Steve Hartman reports on how one neighbor's small gesture helped transfix a little boy. 
      

SUNDAY PROFILE: Angie Dickinson on Frank Sinatra, "Police Woman" and #MeToo | Watch Video
Angie Dickinson's film and TV career has been a half-century-long master class in the art of seduction. Mo Rocca talked with the star of the '70s hit "Police Woman," and such classic films as "Rio Bravo" and "Dressed to Kill" about becoming an inspiration for aspiring policewomen, her relationships with such stars as Frank Sinatra and Burt Bacharach, and the #MeToo movement. Originally broadcast on February 24, 2019.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Angie Dickinson on blowing off "This Is Your Life"
Mo Rocca learns the secret why the film and TV star refused to participate in a taping of the TV show "This Is Your Life" with such guests as Bob Hope and Burt Reynolds, and why she decided against writing an autobiography.

       
PASSAGE:
 Passage: Photographer Robert Frank and singer Eddie Money | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning' remembers a celebrated photographer who documented hardship and isolation in post-war America, and a Grammy-nominated singer known for pop hits of the 1970s and '80s. Jane Pauley reports. 

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Robert Frank's "Americans" (Video)
On September 9, 2019, celebrated Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank died at the age of 94. In this "Sunday Morning" interview broadcast on October 4, 1987, Frank talked about the inspirations behind his classic collection of photographs, "The Americans," taken during a two-year trip across the U.S., which was then being exhibited in a cross-country tour as part of a celebration of his life's work. Charles Kuralt also spoke with curator Anne Tucker, of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, and Evan Turner, director of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

       
COMMENTARY:
 Jim Gaffigan on parents going "back to school" | Watch Video
It's that time of year when children's vacations end, as do their moms' and dads' vacations from parent coffees, school supply shopping sprees, and curriculum nights.

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MOVIES: Irwin Winkler on a life in movies | Watch Video
As a producer, Irwin Winkler has shown "The Right Stuff," made a star of Sylvester Stallone with "Rocky," and had Martin Scorsese's back in the production of two undisputed classics: "Raging Bull" and "Goodfellas." Now, nearly 30 years after "Goodfellas," Winkler, Scorsese, and Robert De Niro are reuniting for "The Irishman," a film about Jimmy Hoffa, which also stars Al Pacino and Joe Pesci. Ben Mankiewicz, the host of Turner Classic Movies, talks with the 88-year-old Winkler about his gangbusters Hollywood career.

BOOK EXCERPT: "A Life in Movies" by Irwin Winkler

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NATURE:
 Chilean marine reserve (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us among sea lions and jellyfish near Chañaral Island, part of the Humboldt Penguin National Reserve off the coast of Chile. Videographer: Mauricio Handler.

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of September 16 | Watch Video
From honors for climate activist Greta Thunberg to the re-opening of the Washington Monument, "Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

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"Trolley - New Orleans" (1955) by Robert Frank. © Robert Frank, from "The Americans"; courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery

GALLERY: Photographer Robert Frank 1924-2019
A look back at the work of one of the most influential of photographers who created intimate, moody portraits of an America struggling to define itself in a post-war world.

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NATURE UP CLOSE: How an insect is key to grizzly bears' survival
The loss of a key food source – whitebark pine trees – to bark beetles can have a devastating effect on bears' ability to hibernate.


RECAP: SEPTEMBER 8

WATCH THE FULL SEPTEMBER 8 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Food fight: Milk and their plant-based alternatives | Watch Video
Americans today are drinking 37% less milk than they did 50 years ago, while the market for plant-based milk has skyrocketed in recent years. But is the beverage derived from plants like almonds and oats "milk," or is it "juice"? As the FDA takes a closer look at just what makes milk "milk," Serena Altschul talks with representatives of plant-based agriculture, and with an organic dairy farmer who is feeling the pinch of a declining market for cow's milk.

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ALMANAC:
 Blondie | Watch Video
Chic Young's comic strip, featuring a blonde flapper and her husband. Dagwood, made its debut on September 8, 1930. Jane Pauley reports.

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BOOKS: "The Handmaid's Tale" author Margaret Atwood: "I have never believed it can't happen here" | Watch Video
Canadian author Margaret Atwood's 1985 dystopian novel, "The Handmaid's Tale," about a United States taken over by Christian zealots who force women to serve as sex slaves and child bearers for a powerful elite, became a bestseller and an Emmy-winning TV series. It has also introduced the iconography of Gilead into today's political discussions. Now, Atwood has penned a sequel, "The Testaments," which has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She tells correspondent Martha Teichner that while she wrote the books as a warning, she does not see herself as a prophet.

READ AN EXCERPT: "The Testaments" by Margaret Atwood

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Margaret Atwood's advice to voters
Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel "The Handmaid's Tale" contains powerful warnings about the misuse of political power. She tells correspondent Martha Teichner that voters should realize, in politics, "We live in the world of least worst," and that abstaining from the ballot box must not be an option. 

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Why the "Marthas" in "Handmaid's Tale"?
Martha Teichner has a question for author Margaret Atwood, whose classic novel "The Handmaid's Tale" features characters named Martha comprising a lower social class in the Republic of Gilead.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Margaret Atwood on the TV version of "The Handmaid's Tale"
Margaret Atwood's classic dystopian novel "The Handmaid's Tale" has been adapted into an award-winning TV series, now in its third season. She has also written a sequel, "The Testaments." She talks with correspondent Martha Teichner about how the TV series has colored her work.

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HARTMAN:
 The handyman (Video)
There is a superhero in Pittsburgh: 29-year-old Jon Potter, a handyman by trade, who helps out anyone who asks for help no matter what they needed. So far, he has done about a thousand good deeds, but who's counting? Steve Hartman reports on what may be Potter's best gift ever.

        
HEADLINES:
 How #MeToo came to light | Watch Video
Erin Moriarty talks with journalists Meghan Twohey and Jodi Kantor, who helped break the story of allegations of harassment and abuse by film producer Harvey Weinstein. Their 2017 New York Times report, which earned them a Pulitzer Prize, helped launch a campaign to combat sexism, discrimination and abuse in the workplace. They discuss where the #MeToo movement has gone in the past two years.

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COMMENTARY:
 Odessa shooting survivor: Congress, do something | Watch Video
Shauna Saxton, a grandmother who looked the gunman in the eyes and escaped the gunfire, says doing nothing in the wake of tragic mass shooting events will mean more innocent lives lost.

MUSIC:  Donny and Marie Osmond, going solo | Watch Video
The two have been in show business almost as long as they've been brother and sister, as solo performers and as headliners of the popular "Donnie & Marie" TV show in the 1970s. For the past 11 years they have been a top draw in Las Vegas. But after almost 1,700 performances, they've decided to bring the curtain down on themselves this November. Lee Cowan talks with them about their new challenges ahead, from Marie taking a seat at "The Talk," to Donny's new solo album.

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SUNDAY JOURNAL:
 Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests | Watch Video
For months protesters in Hong Kong have demonstrated against new bills being debated that would curtail democratic principles, prompting clashes with police and calls for the resignation of the Chief Executive of this Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China. Ramy Inocencio reports on where the divisions between Hong Kong citizens and their government now stands.

FOOTBALL:  Russell Wilson asks the important question: Why not you? | Watch Video
The Seattle Seahawks quarterback, who has led his team to six playoffs, two Super Bowls and one championship victory, is the highest-paid player in the National Football League. But the impact he wants to have goes way beyond money and football. "NFL Today" host and CBS News special correspondent James Brown talks with the 30-year-old Wilson about his role as a mentor to students, and the Why Not You Foundation, which he founded to help empower today's youth.

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CALENDAR:
 Week of September 9 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Canyonlands National Park (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Utah's Canyonlands National Park. Videographer: Judith Lehmberg.

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

NATURE UP CLOSE: Beavers, the master engineers

A keystone species for animals and plants, beavers are crafty builders who continually reshape parts of Wyoming's Snake River.


RECAP: SEPTEMBER 1

GUEST HOST: Lee Cowan

WATCH THE FULL SEPTEMBER 1 EPISODE!

HEADLINES: Deadly mass shooting in Texas (Video)
A terrifying chain of events was triggered by a traffic stop Saturday in the heart of Texas' oil country. A man pulled over by state troopers opened fire and fled, and later hijacked a U.S. Postal Service truck, embarking on a shooting spree. There were at least six fatalities among the 24 people shot. David Begnaud reports. 

HEADLINES: Dorian becomes a category 5 hurricane (Video)
The storm bearing down on the U.S. coastline has strengthened further. Meteorologist Jeff Berardelli has an update, and the threat ahead.

     
COVER STORY:
 Made in U.S.A.: Bringing manufacturing jobs back to the homeland | Watch Video
In 1980 almost 80% of clothing bought in America was made in this country. Today, it's around 3%. But Bayard Winthrop, founder and CEO of the sportswear company American Giant, is trying to turn that around, helping to rebuild an infrastructure and workforce to manufacture clothing that proudly bears the label "Made in USA." He took correspondent John Blackstone on a tour of the production cycle, from cotton farm to finished hoodie.

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ALMANAC:
 Air bags | Watch Video
On September 1, 1998, the safety device became mandatory in all new cars and light trucks in the U.S., subsequently saving tens of thousands of lives. Lee Cowan reports. 

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WORKERS: Sara Nelson, the new face of labor unions | Watch Video
Meet the woman who's been called "the most powerful labor leader in the country": Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, a working mother who has led her organization representing nearly 50,000 flight attendants at 20 airlines through turbulent times for the aviation industry. She talks with Lesley Stahl about her call to arms in the face of a government shutdown earlier this year; about demands for safety in the air; and the prospects of America's labor movement in a climate where the rules often cater to the front office and Wall Street.

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A LOOK BACK AT SUMMER 2019:
  Top Grossing Movies | Watch Video

MILITARY: Gen. Jim Mattis on war and Trump | Watch Video
James Mattis served more than 40 years in the Marines, much of it commanding troops in battle. But he almost didn't make it to boot camp. In this extensive two-part interview, he talks with David Martin about his years in Afghanistan and Iraq, following orders from the Bush administration that he characterized as incoherent, and serving as Secretary of Defense under President Trump. He also talks about his distaste for his colorful nickname, "Mad Dog," and shows off his library of 7,000 books, to which he's added another – his own, titled "Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead." 

BOOK EXCERPT: "Call Sign Chaos" by Jim Mattis and Bing West
The Marine Corps general and former Secretary of Defense writes of his leadership style, noting that "No one needs a tyrant."

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A LOOK BACK AT SUMMER 2019:
 New York Times Non-Fiction Bestsellers | Watch Video 

      
PASSAGE: 
Valerie Harper | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" looks back at the life and career of actress Valerie Harper, who earned four Emmys as Rhoda Morgenstern in the sitcoms "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and "Rhoda." Harper died Friday at the age of 80. Lee Cowan reports. 

MUSIC: Dolly Parton: Making the most of everything | Watch Video
We've been singing along for decades with Dolly Parton, the poor girl from the Great Smoky Mountains who became the glitzy queen of country glamour. She's still at it 24/7, still writing her legacy one song at a time, without a thought for the "R" word. Tony Dokoupil talked with the entertainer, who has sold more than 100 million albums, and who is this year's Grammys MusiCares Person of the Year for her charity work. Originally broadcast on February 10, 2019.

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A LOOK BACK AT SUMMER 2019:
 New York Times Fiction Bestsellers | Watch Video      

      

COMMENTARY: Eric Liu on what makes a true patriot | Watch Video
The former White House speechwriter on what it takes to be called a good citizen - something we all have to earn.

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NATURE:
 Beavers (Extended Video)
On this Sunday before Labor Day we take you to Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, where beavers are as busy as, well, beavers. Videographer: Judith Lehmberg.
         

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

      
CALENDAR: Week of September 2 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Lee Cowan reports.  

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Artist Alicja Kwade's nine massive carved and polished stone spheres, representing the planets, appear to float among intersecting steel frames amid the skyline of Manhattan, at the Metropolitan Museum's of Art's Roof Garden. The Metropolitan Museum of Art/photo by Hyla Skopitz

ART UNDER THE SUN: ParaPivot: The Met's Roof Garden hosts the planets | Watch Video
Artist Alicja Kwade's nine massive carved and polished stone spheres, representing the planets, appear to float among intersecting steel frames amid the skyline of Manhattan. "Sunday Morning" producer Sara Kugel visits her installation, "ParaPivot," at the Roof Garden of New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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The street artist known as HotTea changed his medium of choice from spray paint to yarn. His latest installation hangs in the Casino on Asbury Park, N.J.'s Boardwalk. CBS News

ART UNDER THE SUN: A good yarn - Colorful art on the Asbury Park Boardwalk | Watch Video
After one too many run-ins with the cops, street artist Eric Regier, also known as HotTea, traded in his spray paint for yarn, and now creates installations with a fabric that is colorful and enveloping. "Sunday Morning" producer Sara Kugel checked out his latest immersive artwork on the Boardwalk of Asbury Park, N.J.

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Iván Navarro's neon-decorated sculptures, titled "This Land Is Your Land," speak of a society chasing dreams of economic advancement, social mobility, and home. CBS News

ART UNDER THE SUN: Water towers as art - Iconic urban fixtures decorate a Chicago park | Watch Video
Artist Iván Navarro's neon-decorated sculptures, fashioned after the water towers that dot urban landscapes, speak of a society chasing dreams of economic advancement, social mobility, and home. Titled "This Land Is Your Land," after the Woody Guthrie song, they are currently on display at the Navy Pier in Chicago. "Sunday Morning" producer Sara Kugel reports.

NATURE UP CLOSE: Masters of long-distance flight
Arctic terns fly further than any other animal on Earth, and during the course of their lives may travel 1.5 million miles.


RECAP: AUGUST 25

GUEST HOST: Tracy Smith

WATCH THE FULL AUGUST 25 BROADCAST!         

COVER STORY: Cracking the code of dyslexia | Watch Video
Growing up, Cathy Drennan, who described herself as a "nerdy little kid," landed in the highest reading group at school, only to realize she could not learn to read. Her mother found a specialist and got the diagnosis: Severe dyslexia, an unexpected difficulty in reading in an individual who has the intelligence to read at a much higher level. Yale researchers who have studied hundreds of kindergartners for nearly 40 years say one in five was dyslexic. But perhaps their most important finding: There is no link at all between dyslexia and intelligence. Susan Spencer reports on efforts to help those with dyslexia "crack the code."

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ALMANAC:
 Monty Hall | Watch Video
On August 25, 1921, the host of the game show "Let's Make a Deal" was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Tracy Smith reports.

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PHOTOGRAPHY: Cowgirl photographer Barbara Van Cleve | Watch Video
Barbara Van Cleve is 84, born and bred in Montana, and she still runs cattle with the best. She is also a photographer with a passion to chronicle the ranching life she learned as a child, especially the lives of ranch women. Barry Petersen reports.

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SUNDAY PROFILE: Eddie Huang on the myth of the "model minority" | Watch Video
He's a restaurateur, a streetwear designer, a TV show host, and most famously the author of "Fresh Off the Boat," his humorous 2013 memoir about growing up the eldest of three sons of Chinese immigrants that spawned a hit ABC sitcom. Eddie Huang talks with Mo Rocca about family, the myth of the "model minority," and pork buns.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Eddie Huang on writing "Fresh Off the Boat"
Eddie Huang talks about the "chip on his shoulder" that influenced his writing the bestselling memoir "Fresh Off the Boat," about growing up the child of Chinese immigrants.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Eddie Huang on making his dad proud
Eddie Huang talks about a conversation he recently had with his father about death.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Eddie Huang on Chinese cooking
Restaurateur Eddie Huang talks with Mo Rocca about authenticity and individuality in Chinese cuisine.

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POSTCARD FROM BUENOS AIRES:  Argentina's Italian heritage | Watch Video
Buenos Aires, Argentina, is the most-visited city in all of South America. And no visit is complete without a trip to La Boca, a colorful neighborhood that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries experienced a massive wave of Italian immigration. Today an estimated 62% of Argentinians claim some Italian heritage. Correspondent Conor Knighton gets a taste of Buenos Aires' best pizza, gelato and Italian liqueurs, and surveys the imprint that Italian immigrants had on Argentina's art and culture.

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HARTMAN:
 The view through Quinn's window (Video)
Three-year-old Quinn Waters' natural immunity was temporarily wiped out after he got a stem cell transplant to treat his brain cancer. As a precaution, he isn't allowed outside his Weymouth, Massachusetts house, and no one is allowed inside to visit. But that hasn't stopped the world from beating a path to his window. Steve Hartman reports.

MUSIC: Taylor Swift on "Lover" and haters | Watch Video
In an interview offering viewers some unprecedented glimpses backstage, 10-time Grammy Award-winner Taylor Swift opens up to correspondent Tracy Smith, who witnesses the creation of Swift's new music video. Smith also sat down with Swift at the piano to discuss her songwriting process, growing up in the business, and how the 29-year-old plans to reclaim ownership of a music catalog that has made her one of the most successful artists today. 

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Taylor Swift on her family's support of her career
At age 13 Taylor Swift was signed to a development deal by RCA Records. As she tells Tracy Smith, her family agreed to pull up stakes and move from Pennsylvania to Nashville for the sake of her career.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Taylor Swift's thick skin
Taylor Smith explains to correspondent Tracy Smith how she's evolved a means to deal with critics.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Taylor Swift on "Reputation"
Taylor Swift talks about her 2017 album "Reputation," which touched on celebrity and the pressures of fame and media attention.

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BEVERAGES: A craft beer even Jim Gaffigan would like | Watch Video
Last year our commentator Jim Gaffigan had some choice words for craft brews. Now, "Sunday Morning" is following up with some news from the beer world. 

SPORTS: Chasing the dream | Watch Video
Being ranked in the top 200 players in the world is great in just about any sport. But in the world of tennis, an athlete ranked 197th is just barely scrimping by, living a nomadic life in second-rate hotels while competing in tournaments like the Little Rock Open Challenger. Senior contributor Ted Koppel looks at the human toll tennis takes on those competing on the professional circuit. He sits down with Noah Rubin (whose highest ranking was 125th in the world), who opens up about the grind of life on the road, and about the success of his Instagram page, Behind the Racquet, which tells the stories of those who have made tennis their careers.

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CALENDAR:
 Week of August 26
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Tracy Smith reports.

      
NATURE:
 Outer Banks shore birds (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us among shorebirds at North Carolina's Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. Videographer: Carl Mrozek.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: 

NATURE UP CLOSE: A trip to the American Museum of Natural History
Visiting New York City's Mecca for any natural history fanatic.


RECAP: AUGUST 18

Jane Pauley hosts a special broadcast of "Sunday Morning" from Tuscany, sharing stories on all things Italian – art and design, traditions and culture, fashion, food, music, entertainment and history. (This show was originally broadcast May 19, 2019.)

WATCH THE FULL AUGUST 18 BROADCAST!

OPENING: "Ablassen" (Video)
The "Sunday Morning" theme is performed by cellist Christian Grosselfinger on the streets of Florence. 

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COVER STORY:
 Emigration, full circle: Returning to the old country | Watch Video
Mark Phillips meets with Americans whose Italian ancestors emigrated to the New World, who have themselves emigrated back to the Old World.  And thanks to Italian citizenship laws, the Italian blood that has flowed in their family's veins through generations has opened up doors to their becoming Italian citizens.

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ART:
 Michelangelo's David | Watch Video
Michelangelo's masterpiece, the 17-foot-tall statue of David, stands front-and-center at the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence. Jane Pauley reflects on the quintessence of Renaissance art.

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A RENAISSANCE CITY:
 Florence - A history | Watch Video
For centuries the Italian city of Florence has been a hub of trade and commerce, and an historic center for art and architecture. Jane Pauley reports.

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FOOD: Creating an irresistible mozzarella | Watch Video
At the organic cheesemaker Tenuta Vannulo, in southern Italy, the specialty is fresh buffalo mozzarella. Seth Doane checks out the process of creating a simply delicious cheese.

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BOOKS:
 The birthplace of Pinocchio | Watch Video
The tiny Tuscan town of Collodi was the birthplace of Pinocchio. Created in 1881 by journalist-author Carlo Lorenzini (who took the town's name as his pen name), the wooden puppet who became a real boy was the star of a coming-of-age story much darker than the familiar Disney film. Lee Cowan reports. 

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ART: Treasures of the Uffizi (Video)
Seven years before America's Declaration of Independence, the Uffizi opened its doors to the public. Containing perhaps the greatest collection of artwork in the world, including masterpieces by Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael and Botticelli, the Florentine museum holds treasures at every turn. Jane Pauley reports.

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ART: Florentine artisans: Preserving the traditions of Medici taste | Watch Video
Florence is one of the last cities in the world that still has a thriving culture of artisanship, with historic roots that go back 600 years. Martha Teichner reports.

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ROYALTY:
 A royal estate in Tuscany | Watch Video
The Corsini estate, Villa Le Corti, sits high atop a hillside outside Florence, in the Tuscan wine region of Chianti, on land Princess Giorgiana Corsini's family has owned since the 1300s. Jane Pauley reports.   

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BOOKS: Under the Tuscan sun with author Frances Mayes | Watch Video
In 1990, American professor and poet Frances Mayes felt an irresistible urge to buy a derelict 300-year-old property. She transformed it into one of the most famous villas in Tuscany, attracting a constant stream of tourists, thanks to her bestselling memoir about restoring the house, called "Under the Tuscan Sun." The book spent more than two-and-a-half years on the bestseller list, and later became a popular film. Mayes talks with correspondent Rita Braver about her unexpected success, her adopted village of Cortona, and her latest book, "See You in the Piazza."

WEB EXTRA: Recipes from "Under the Tuscan Sun" author Frances Mayes

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MEDICINE: The world's oldest pharmacy | Watch Video
Florence's Santa Maria Novella Pharmacy, which dates back to 1221 when Dominican monks began experimenting with alchemy, is thought to be the oldest apothecary in the world. Rose water? It was invented here, as were other medicinal and aromatic innovations, as reported by Jane Pauley.

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FASHION: Brunello Cucinelli: Fashion and philosophy | Watch Video
In a country where thousands of little towns are being deserted, one village is thriving, mainly due to the work of one extraordinary man: designer Brunello Cucinelli. His company, which makes some of the finest and priciest clothing in the world, has raised the fortunes of Solomeo, restored the town's ancient buildings, and upheld the dignity of local workers by forging what has been called a "humanistic enterprise in the world of industry." Tracy Smith reports.

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FOOD: Nutella, the spread that made hazelnuts famous | Watch Video
The rich chocolate-hazelnut creation, known to the world as Nutella, has been a staple for generations of local cooks. Seth Doane visited the Langhe region of Piedmont, Italy, where the rolling hills are covered with hazelnut trees, and with confectioners and pastry makers who bask in the delights of the hazelnut.

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MUSIC: Sting, Trudie Styler, and their summer home in Italy | Watch Video
Il Palagio, a 400-year-old villa in Tuscany, is a summer house that the singer-musician Sting, and his wife, Trudie Styler, bought for a song or two. They've fixed it up, and brought the olive groves, vineyards and vegetable gardens back to life. Sting and Trudie talk with correspondent Alina Cho about music, raising a family, and revitalizing a cherished homestead.

For more info:

ART: Trafficking in art | Watch Video
In Florence even the street signs are pieces of art.  Playful, funny, irreverent, hundreds of them dot the landscape thanks to a street artist who goes by name Clet, a Frenchman who saw an opportunity to do something different in a place imbued in history. Jane Pauley reports.

For more info:

FOOD: True espresso love: Attending a university of coffee | Watch Video
The vibrant southern Italian city of Naples seems to run on espresso. Seth Doane explores the Neapolitan love of coffee with tour guide Marcello Uzzi, and attends lessons at the Italian coffee powerhouse Illy's own University of Coffee in Trieste, where the highly-calibrated method of preparing the perfect cup of espresso is taught.

For more info:

       
NATURE:
 Tuscan countryside (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Villa Le Corti, just outside Florence. Videographer: Mike Hernandez.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: 

       
NATURE UP CLOSE:
 Theodore Roosevelt, the conservation president
The conservation movement in the U.S. dramatically advanced under the 26th president's watch, as he established 5 national parks, created the National Wildlife Refuge System and U.S. Forest Service, and oversaw the protection of 230,000,000 acres.


RECAP: AUGUST 11

WATCH THE FULL AUGUST 11 EPISODE!       

HEADLINES: Shock and anger at Jeffrey Epstein's apparent death by suicide (VIDEO)
The formerly high-flying finance figure and accused pedophile apparently took his own life Saturday morning inside a Manhattan jail. Mola Lenghi reports.

      
COVER STORY:
 Hearing aids: You ain't heard nothing yet | Watch Video
Two out of three people over age 70 have trouble hearing, but only about 20% of adults who have hearing loss actually use a hearing aid, for the most part because of costs related to the devices themselves and to testing and consultations with a doctor or audiologist. David Pogue checks out the latest advances in hearing aid technology that have reduced size and added unique features, and finds out what changes consumers can anticipate after Congress passed a bill allowing hearing aids to be sold over-the-counter. (Originally broadcast September 30, 2018.)

EXTRA: Guide to hearing aids
Information on improving your hearing is just a click away.

For more info:

    
ALMANAC:
 Instant coffee | Watch Video
On August 11, 1903, Japanese-American chemist Satori Kato received a U.S. patent for his method of making instant coffee in tablet form. Jane Pauley reports.

FASHION: Nail art: A hands-on introduction to fabulous style | Watch Video
If ever there were an art form that was literally hands-on, it's nail art. For some, getting a manicure these days is less maintenance and more masterpiece, as seen on fashion runways and the hit TV show "Claws," which has its very own nail stylist department. Correspondent Alina Cho meets the nail artists who have the world at their fingertips.

For more info:

CULTURE: A tale of mermaids | Watch Video
Our fascination with mermaids is as deep as the sea, going back centuries to the myth of a Syrian goddess who was transformed into a half-fish. Faith Salie reports on how the folklore of mermaids got its legs as a feature of modern stories, movies, Coney Island, and Weeki Wachee Springs State Park in Florida.

For more info:

MUSIC: Common: Love is "the best thing we got on this planet" | Watch Video
This year has been particularly remarkable for the 47-year-old rapper and actor known as Common, with a recent bestselling book, an upcoming album, a new film, and an arts-based charter school opening just blocks from where he grew up on the south side of Chicago. Common talked with correspondent Michelle Miller about his self-improvement as a parent, as a sexual abuse survivor, and the ways in which he is trying to make a difference.

For more info:

       
PASSAGE:
 Toni Morrison and D.A. Pennebaker | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" looks back at the careers of two creative giants: Nobel Laureate in Literature Toni Morrison ("Beloved"), and documentary filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker ("Don't Look Back"). Jane Pauley reports.  

      
HARTMAN:
 The doctor is in (Video)
For 15 years, Carl Allamby was a master mechanic at a car garage in Ohio. But while studying to earn a business degree, his childhood dream to be a physician took over, and in short order the car doctor became a real doctor. Steve Hartman reports on one mechanic's remarkable second career. 

MOVIES: Julianne Moore on portraying unseen women, and maintaining longevity on-screen | Watch Video
Jane Pauley profiles the Oscar-winning actress, now starring in the film "Gloria Bell," about a free-spirited divorcee who discovers romance in an L.A. dance club. (Originally broadcast March 3, 2019.)

For more info:

      
OPINION:
 Jim Gaffigan: Decaf coffee is un-American | Watch Video
The comedian says people who drink "dirt liquid" are the real problem facing our nation.

For more info: 

DANCE: The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at 60 | Watch Video
The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, founded by the groundbreaking dancer-choreographer Alvin Ailey (1931-1989), is celebrating 60 years as one of the world's preeminent modern dance companies. Rita Braver looks back at the legacy of Ailey, including his school for aspiring dancers, and talks with those who succeeded him as the company's artistic director, Judith Jamison and Robert Battle.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Rising Alvin Ailey star Jacqueline Green
Dancer Jacqueline Green started at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's school at age 17, and today is one of the rising stars of the venerable dance company. She told correspondent Rita Braver she credits her success to the company's founder.

For more info:

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of August 12 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead, Jane Pauley reports.

      
NATURE:
 Bighorn sheep (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us among Bighorn sheep near Nevada's Mount Grant. Videographer: Derek Reich. 

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

NATURE UP CLOSE: The vitality of grasslands
Grasslands, or prairies, provide essential habitat and food sources for many species, and harbor a rich diversity of plants and animals.


RECAP: AUGUST 4

WATCH THE FULL AUGUST 4 BROADCAST!

HEADLINES: Police search for motive in El Paso Walmart mass shooting (Video)
Police in Texas say they are closing in a motive for a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso Saturday, in which 20 people were killed and more than two dozen injured. The suspect is in custody. Correspondent Janet Shamlian has the latest. 

       
COVER STORY
Guns and public health | Watch Video
This past winter more than 40 medical organizations joined forces to confront the 40,000 firearm-related deaths that occur each year – a public health epidemic, they say, that can be addressed. Dr. Jon LaPook reports. 

For more info:

         
ALMANAC:
 The silencing of the telephone | Watch Video
On August 4, 1922, at 6:25 p.m. ET, telephone service across the U.S. and Canada was shut down for one full minute in honor of the late Alexander Graham Bell. Jane Pauley reports.

        
POSTCARD FROM SRI LANKA:
 Swimming with whales (Video)
The Indian Ocean is home to one of the most diverse whale populations in the world – as many as 18 species live there. And no one can get you closer to these hauntingly mysterious creatures than American wildlife photographer Patrick Dykstra. Correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti joined Dykstra as they went swimming with whales in the waters off Sri Lanka.

For more info:

TELEVISION: The artistry of Angela Bassett | Watch Video
Actress Angela Bassett, who has played roles that are fierce, sultry and iconic, had an upbringing molded by two strong women. She talks with correspondent Michelle Miller about how her mother and her aunt helped shape her pursuit of an acting career. The busy mother of two also talks about her new Netflix film, "Otherhood," in which she plays one of a trio of mothers trying to reconnect with their adult children.

For more info:

       
HARTMAN:
 The valuable advice of old coots (Video)
A tradition is brewing In Salt Lake City where, every Saturday in the summer, a group of senior citizens who regularly meet and gab at a local coffee shop are offering up free advice to anyone who visits their booth at a farmer's market, under the banner reading "Old Coots Giving Advice." But don't anyone expect all their advice to be good. (Dear Abby, they are not.) Steve Hartman talked with the Old Coots about their pearls of wisdom mixed in with the jokes.
       

burk-uzzle-photograph-of-nick-and-bobbi-ercoline-huddled-under-a-blanket-at-the-1969-woodstock-festival-became-famous.jpg
Burk Uzzle's photograph of Nick and Bobbi Ercoline, huddled under a blanket at the 1969 Woodstock festival, became famous as the cover of the live album.  CBS News

RETROSPECTIVE: Woodstock at 50: A return to "ground zero for peace and love" | Watch Video
In the summer of 1969 a festival promising "three days of peace and music" was announced in upstate New York. Four hundred thousand people showed up at what would become a monumental human event. Jim Axelrod talks to a few of those who were there, from musicians John Fogerty and Graham Nash, to a young couple, Nick and Bobbi Ercoline, who returned for the first time in 50 years to the site of the festival, where in 1969 a photograph of them captured a unique moment in music history.

PREVIEW VIDEO: John Fogerty on the musical legacy of Woodstock
One of the founding members of Creedence Clearwater Revival, John Fogerty, talked with correspondent Jim Axelrod about his experience playing at the 1969 Woodstock Music and Arts Fair in Bethel, N.Y., and how it inspired his 1970 classic, "Who'll Stop the Rain." 

WEB EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: Graham Nash performs "Teach Your Children"
The singer-songwriter, who was a member of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and is still a member of the Woodstock generation, tells CBS News' Jim Axelrod he is "still a hippie … The basic ideas are that love is better than hatred, that peace is much better than war, that we have to take care of our fellow human beings 'cause this is all we have. Those tenets that were established then are still relevant to me today." Graham Nash performs his song "Teach Your Children."

FROM THE ARCHIVE: From 1979: Looking back at Woodstock (Video)
On the 10th anniversary of the 1969 Woodstock Music and Arts Fair, "Sunday Morning" talked with some of those who were there: Singers David Crosby and David Crosby, of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and Paul Kantner, of Jefferson Airplane, who performed on stage; and environmental advocate Mark Trautwein, who was among the vast sea of young people in attendance. Correspondent Lem Tucker reports. Originally broadcast on August 12, 1979.

For more info:

  • Footage from the documentary "Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace and Music" licensed by Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
  • "Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace and Music" (1970), directed by Michael Wadleigh, released by Warner Brothers, available on Blu-ray/DVD (Amazon) and via Streaming (AmazonGoogle PlayiTunesVudu and YouTube)
  • Images © Barry Z Levine, courtesy of the photographer (woodstockwitness.com), and © Burk Uzzle
  • John Fogerty
  • Graham Nash

       
BY THE NUMBERS:
 The Woodstock festival | Watch Video
        

COMICS: How the Peanuts character Woodstock got his name | Watch Video
The Charles M. Schulz Museum, in Santa Rosa, Calif., is celebrating one of the most popular "Peanuts" characters with an exhibition devoted to Woodstock, the little "hippie bird" who became a devoted friend of Snoopy's. Luke Burbank talks with the comic strip artist's widow, Jean Schulz, exhibition curator Benjamin Clark, and cartoonist Paige Braddock, about the important role Woodstock played in the Peanuts universe.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: How to draw Woodstock the bird
There are tricks to drawing the faithful friend of Snoopy in Charles Schulz's "Peanuts" comic strip. Cartoonist Paige Braddock gave correspondent Luke Burbank some pointers.

For more info:

          
ART:
 The Japanese art of tie dyeing | Watch Video
The art of applying resist-dyeing techniques to fabrics, also known as tie dying, has been practiced in Japan for hundreds of years. Correspondent Lucy Craft reports from the town of Arimatsu, where merchant houses specializing in producing exquisite "shibori" dyed fabrics have stood for centuries.

For more info:

          
OPINION:
 Woodstock: Sign of the times | Watch Video
The three-day music festival held on a dairy farm in New York in August 1969 attended by 400,000 people wasn't a summation of the counterculture movement in America in the 1960s, says contributor Bill Flanagan, but rather a harbinger of things to come.

          
NATURE:
 Flowers of Oglala National Grasslands (Video)
"Sunday Morning" displays some true "flower power" at the Oglala National Grasslands in Nebraska.

For more info:

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of August 5 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

woodstocktapereelwide-1904471-640x360.jpg
A new box set contains virtually every minute of audio - much of it never heard before - from the 1969 Woodstock festival, totaling 36 hours. CBS News

"SUN SPOTS": The sounds of Woodstock reborn | Watch Video
A new CD box set, "Woodstock 50: Back to the Garden," captures virtually every minute of audio from the 1969 music festival, from the performers to P.A. announcements and audience interactions. "Sunday Morning" producer Sara Kugel talked with music producer Andy Zax and audio engineer Brian Kehew about canvassing the contents of the Warner Music Vault in Los Angeles to create a magnum opus chronicling an unparalleled event in music history.

For more info:

vw-light-bus-resurrection-a-620.jpg
A reproduction of the VW "Light Bus," which was immortalized by a photographer at the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair. VW

RESTORATION: A Woodstock icon recreated: The VW "Light Bus"
A new documentary chronicles efforts to locate a long-lost totem of the '60s counterculture and bring it back to life.

For more info: 


RECAP: JULY 28

Our annual special broadcast that looks into the many ways we earn, spend, invest, waste, lose, and go without money, featuring guest host Martha Teichner, originally broadcast on May 5, 2019.

WATCH THE FULL JULY 28 EPISODE!

OVER STORY: Calling it quits: When leaving your job is the right thing to do | Watch Video
Many Americans with full-time jobs say they daydream about leaving those jobs far behind. But giving up an unsatisfying career (and the paycheck with it) is not just a fantasy, say those who have experienced the joy of quitting. Tony Dokoupil reports.

BOOK EXCERPT: Read a chapter from Seth Godin's "The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick)"

For more info:

        
CURRENCY:
 Sweden is going cashless | Watch Video
The Swedish band ABBA has been singing about "Money, Money, Money" for years. But if you try to buy a ticket to the pop group's museum exhibition in Stockholm with cash, you're out of luck; it's one of the increasing number of establishments that has stopped accepting cash. Mark Phillips looks at how Sweden is becoming a cashless society, where transactions are all done with smartphones and devices, and where last year only 13% of Swedes could remember using coins or bills for a recent purchase. 

For more info:

LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION!: Work remotely? Tulsa, Oklahoma wants you (and your laptop) to move | Watch Video
With countless people working remotely from their homes, does it really matter where they live? According to Tulsa, Oklahoma, no! The city of 400,000 that has plenty of hip coffee shops, bustling bars, and a thriving arts district also wants more telecommuters, and is willing to pay you $10,000 to relocate there. Conor Knighton talks with people who have picked up and moved to the Sooner State after signing up for the Tulsa Remote program.

For more info:

COMMERCE: Many happy returns | Watch Video
Typically about 8% of items purchased at a store will be returned; for ecommerce sites, that can be 25% to 40%. And all the stuff that stores cannot easily resell will wind up in the secondary market, where one company's trash can become other people's treasure. Rita Braver visits liquidators who process and resell goods that are just as good as new, or even newer.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: When customers return high-end fashions
Roughly a third of apparel purchases may end up as returns, and high-end stores may not be the final resting place for high-end fashions. In this web exclusive, correspondent Rita Braver talks with supply chain logistics expert Dale Rogers about what happens when customers bring stuff back.

For more info:

FOOD: A slice of the pizza business | Watch Video
For one week every year, the center of the known pizza universe isn't Naples, Italy, or New York (or even Chicago); it's Las Vegas, when the International Pizza Expo rolls into town, bringing with it thousands of professional pizza-makers, and those dreaming of getting into the business. Luke Burbank talks with aspiring pizzeria owners, and those who have pursued their dreams and are now rolling in dough.

For more info:

       
DERIVATIVES:
 CBD: On a real market high | Watch Video
Cannabidiol, a chemical compound extracted from hemp, is now at the center of a swiftly-growing industry which last year derived about $600 million in U.S. sales. Lee Cowan reports.

For more info:

TOURISM: Celebrity Edge, Celebrity Cruises' brand-new, billion-dollar cruise ship | Watch Video
Martha Teichner checks out how continuous innovations in ship design have made cruises a booming industry, and steps aboard Celebrity Cruises' latest ship, the Celebrity Edge, which redefines travel on the high seas.

For more info:  

SUNDAY PROFILE: Keeping up with Kris Jenner | Watch Video
You might say the Kardashians changed the way we look at money and fame. Now, meet the woman who literally gave birth to the most influential family of celebrities on the planet, as Tracy Smith sits down with Kris Jenner.

For more info:

     
SAFE KEEPING:
 Safecracking: The right combination (Video)
Safecrackers have been around as long as safes have. And while safecracking in real life may not be as dramatic as it appears in the movies, for the pros an uncracked safe is a challenge to be savored. David Pogue talked to some experts on manipulating open safes for whatever possible treasures await inside.

For more info:

ART: Face value: Portraits on money | Watch Video
Since the 1980s, Seth Dickerman has been photographing the portraits of presidents that appear on our currency – the stoic profiles on bills and coins that are so familiar, but which look strangely new under his camera lens. With magnifications of up to 10,000 percent, Dickerman's portraits reveal the nicks and scrapes on faces that have weathered years of transactions. John Blackstone reports.

For more info:

      
INDEX:
 Taxes
Among the corporations paying no income taxes last year: AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER, DELTA AIR LINES, CHEVRON, GENERAL MOTORS, DEERE, AMAZON.COM, ELI LILLY, IBM, GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER, NETFLIX, GANNETT, MOLSON COORS, HALIBURTON, ARAMARK and PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL. Full list at The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.


NATURE:
 California condors (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes you to Pinnacles National Park, soaring with the California Condor. Nearly extinct in the 1980s, last week conservationists announced the birth of the 1,000th chick. Videographer: Lance Milbrand.

NATURE UP CLOSE: Rescuing the California condor
Almost 40 years ago there were 22 birds left; today the species' population has increased dramatically.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: 

NATURE UP CLOSE: Cancun reefs and Sargassum
Changes in the Gulf of Mexico are an indication of how human activities in one area can negatively affect organisms thousands of miles away.


RECAP: JULY 21

GUEST HOST: LEE COWAN

HEADLINES: Heat wave grips much of the U.S. (VIDEO)
From Texas to the Great Lakes, and east to New England, a heat wave – in some areas in triple digits – is broiling the nation. So far, it's blamed for at least six deaths. Meg Oliver reports.

      
COVER STORY:
 "Mike Wallace is here" | Watch Video
Four words that struck terror into the hearts of shady businessmen and corrupt politicians – "Mike Wallace is here" – also comprise the title of a new documentary that depicts the dramatic life and career of the legendary CBS News correspondent, whose no-holds-barred interview style and indefatigable showmanship helped make "60 Minutes" must-see TV.  Rita Braver talks with filmmaker Avi Belkin (who was granted unprecedented access to CBS News' archives), and with Mike's son, "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace, about building a career in the footsteps of a giant.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Chris Wallace on Mike Wallace stealing interviews
In this web exclusive, Chris Wallace, host of "Fox News Sunday," talks with Rita Braver about his father, legendary CBS newsman Mike Wallace, whose competitiveness for interviews stretched even to stealing an interview with comedian Chris Rock from his own son. 

GALLERY: Remembering Mike Wallace, 1918-2012

"Mike Wallace Is Here" opens in theaters July 26, To watch a trailer click on the video player below.

Mike Wallace Is Here - Official Trailer by Magnolia Pictures & Magnet Releasing on YouTube

For more info:

        
ALMANAC:
 New York City's Central Park | Watch Video
On July 21, 1853, hundreds of acres of land in the center of Manhattan were set aside for parkland, ultimately developed into one of the world's most glorious public spaces. Lee Cowan reports.

GALLERY: New York's Central Park

For more info: 

BEVERAGES: Sparkling water is making a splash | Watch Video
Welcome to the "Age of Effervescence," when sales of seltzer and sparkling water are positively bubbling over. Serena Altachul talks with seltzer expert Barry Joseph, author of "Seltzertopia," and with Alex Gomberg, the owner of Brooklyn Seltzer Boys, where carbonated water has been produced for generations. Originally broadcast on November 18, 2018.

For more info: 

MUSIC: ZZ Top: After 50 years they've still got legs | Watch Video
The band ZZ Top is marking 50 years together, with a new remastered collection of their greatest hits, "Goin' 50." Jim Axlerod talks with guitarist Billy Gibbons, bassist Dusty Hill, and drummer Frank Beard (the one without a beard) who are still working hard to make their pedal-to-the-metal, bluesy country rock seem so easy.

For more info:

      
HARTMAN:
 Finding peace for the fallen, and themselves (VIDEO)
At a cemetery in Chester, Illinois, Lt. Perry Dotson is 50 years late for the funeral of Army Private First Class Leonard Nitzsche, who was in Dotson's platoon in Vietnam when, in April 1970, he was killed. Dotson felt he never had the chance to properly grieve the loss of the young man – nor, it turns out, did other members of his platoon, prompting an unforgettable reunion. Steve Hartman reports. 

NATURE:  On the brink: The Endangered Species Act | Watch Video
Around the world, plant and animal species are going extinct at a rate faster than any time in human history. The Endangered Species Act, signed into law 46 years ago, has succeeded in preventing hundreds of species on the list from going extinct, and has recovered 54 species. But new regulatory changes to the Act are being finalized by the Trump administration, which may weaken its ability to protect wildlife and habitat, and – say wildlife advocates – speed extinctions. Conor Knighton reports.

For more info:

        
MILEPOST: National Ice Cream Day

COMEDY: Hannah Gadsby: There is life after trauma | Watch Video
Luke Burbank profiles the Australian writer., actress and standup comedian whose recent Netflix special, "Hannah Gadsby: Nanette," about the intersection of comedy and tragedy, earned her a Peabody Award, and whose latest show, "Douglas," is even more revealing. 

See also:

SPACE: SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on the next giant leap for mankind | Watch Video
As the founder, CEO and lead designer at SpaceX, a private company that makes rockets and spacecraft, Elon Musk envisions a time when his reusable rockets will bring people to the moon and Mars. He's focused on humans becoming a "multi-planet species," and on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, he speaks with Jeffrey Kluger (editor-at-large at Time magazine, and the co-author of "Apollo 13") about his vision for the future.

WEB EXTRA: Read an extended interview with Elon Musk

GALLERY: The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasts off

For more info:

       

OPINION: He said, ze said: Faith Salie on preferred gender pronouns | Watch Video
The grammar geek talks about the practice of choosing or requesting non-binary pronouns.

For more info:

         
CALENDAR:
 Week of July 22 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Lee Cowan reports.

         
NATURE:
 Cuba's Isle of Youth (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us under the sea, at Cuba's Isle of Youth (Isla de la Juventud). Videographer: Ziggy Livnat.


RECAP: JULY 14

HEADLINES: Intense rainfall from Barry swamps Louisiana, Mississippi (Video)
Barry quickly lost its punch after coming ashore Saturday as the first hurricane of the year. But up to 20 inches of rain may fall as the system moves inland. Omar Villafranca, in Mandeville on Lake Ponchartrain, reports.

HEADLINES: Blackout dims New York's bright lights (Video)
The power is back in New York City after an apparent transformer fire Saturday evening caused a widespread blackout, darkening many Broadway shows but not the spirit of New Yorkers. Laura Podesta reports.

COVER STORY: Bowled over for breakfast | Watch Video
What happened when food blogger Wil Fulton tried an experiment of eating nothing but breakfast cereal for a week – 82 consecutive bowls? Susan Spencer talks with Fulton about his serial dining on cereal. She also talks with Yale University's Paul Freedman about the history of breakfasts; Dana McNabb, of General Mills, who is bowled over by new varieties of cereal; and registered dietitian Wendy Lopez, who reveals her secret to breakfast smoothies. Originally broadcast on November 18, 2018.

For more info:

       
ALMANAC:
 Measuring tape | Watch Video
On July 14, 1868, Alvin Fellows patented his "new and useful improvement in spring measuring tapes." Jane Pauley reports.

ART: Black models in modern art | Watch Video
A recent New York City art exhibition, now at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, explores the importance of black models as key to the development of 19th and 20th century art, through their representations by French and American artists (including Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Frederic Bazille and Jean-Louis André Théodore Géricault). Nancy Giles talks with curator Denise Murrell about how the Harlem Renaissance influenced painters such as Henri Matisse, and with Brooklyn artist Mickalene Thomas about black figures in art at a time of social and political transformation.

For more info:

        
PASSAGE:
 Remembering Rip Torn, Jim Bouton and Ross Perot (Video)
        
       
BOOKS:
 Colson Whitehead on "The Nickel Boys" | Watch Video
Author Colson Whitehead won a Pulitzer Prize for his bestselling 2016 novel "The Underground Railroad." He talks with Lee Cowan about his latest novel, "The Nickel Boys," a fictional tale of cruelty and trauma based on the notorious Alfred G. Dozer School for Boys outside Tallahassee, where the neglect and abuse of children was rampant for decades.

WEB EXTRA: Read an extended transcript of Lee Cowan's interview with Colson Whitehead

For more info:

      
HARTMAN:
 A blooming business (Video)
Art Chadwick, who owns Chadwick & Son Orchids, near Richmond, Virginia, will happily sell you an orchid. But he's also willing to board your plant while you're on vacation. And yes, there are people who will pay to put up their beloved flowering plants, to make sure they're kept in clover. Steve Hartman reports.

For more info:       

APOLLO 11:  To the Moon! A chronicle of mankind's greatest adventure | Watch Video
Jeffrey Kluger, editor-at-large at Time magazine, recounts the human landmark of landing men on the lunar surface. Kluger talks with Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins and astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin and, in archive footage, hears from mission commander Neil Armstrong about the achievement of the first Moon landing, and of the "magnificent desolation" they found there.

For more info:

  • Apollo 11 (nasa.gov)
  • Apollo 11 (Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum)
  • "Apollo 13" by Jim Lovell and Jeffrey Kluger (Mariner), in Hardcover, Trade Paperback and eBook formats, available via Amazon

         
APOLLO 11:
 Events and exhibits celebrating Apollo 11 at 50 | Watch Video
When it comes to commemorating the anniversary of Man landing on the moon, the sky's the limit!

APOLLO 11: The seamstresses who helped put a man on the moon | Watch Video
When NASA needed a lunar spacesuit for the Apollo astronauts, they turned to the International Latex Corporation, and a cadre of women who normally sewed latex bras, to create a softer, more flexible spacesuit. Tracy Smith talked with some of the seamstresses who fashioned protective wear that would mean life or death for men in space, and with Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison "Jack" Schmitt who was the last man to walk, and jump, on the lunar surface.

For more info:

       
APOLLO 11: 
The Moon, by the numbers | Watch Video

       
ESSAY:
 Walter Cronkite and the awe of space exploration | Watch Video
Martha Teichner on the CBS News veteran's coverage of an epochal human event: Man landing on the moon.

       
CALENDAR:
 Week of July 15 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Full moon (Video)
"Sunday Morning" checks out a full moon setting over Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts. Videographer: Scot Miller.      

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

NATURE UP CLOSE: Nature up close: Swimming with whale sharks
A meeting with giants off the coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
       


RECAP: JULY 7

WATCH THE FULL 7/7 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Where's the beef? Hamburger patties made from plants | Watch Video 
Allison Aubrey reports on hamburgers that are made from plants instead of beef, but still taste like the real thing.

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TRAVEL: A trip down the mighty Mississippi |  Watch Video
From the gentle rising headwaters in Northern Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico over 2,300 miles downstream, Mo Rocca takes a trip on the Mississippi River.

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ART: Graffiti beyond the streets |  Watch Video 
What was once a symbol of New York's 'bad old days' is now being celebrated. Serena Altschul reports on "Beyond the Streets," the largest exhibition of graffiti and street art ever produced.

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FASHION: Dapper Dan's rags to riches story | Watch Video 
On fashion's biggest night, Dapper Dan can't believe he has center stage. Michelle Miller reports on the Harlem designer's saga that's been three quarters of a century in the making.

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SPORTS: Learning how to drive a monster truck | Watch Video
Monster trucks. Those big bouncy very American contributions to motor sport, are actually extremely hard to drive. Luke Burbank found out how hard, when he attended Monster Jam University.

MUSIC: America, the band, still touring after 50 years | Watch Video
"Ventura Highway" was a very big summer song back in the 70's for the band that's known as America. So what are its founders up to these days? Still traveling a familiar road. John Blackstone reports

HARTMAN: The 97-year-old bagboy
Benny Ficeto of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, has been doing oddjobs since he 'retired' in the 1980s. Steve Hartman reports on the 97-year-old who loves a hard day's work.

ALMANAC: Ringo Starr's birthday | Watch Video
79 years ago today, Richard Starkey was born in a tough neighborhood of Liverpool, England. He grew up to become known as Ringo Starr, the drummer who in 1962 joined John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison in the Beatles  

OPINION: Jim Gaffigan says cheeseburgers are in "grave danger" | Watch Video 
People are putting so many toppings on cheeseburgers, they're becoming harder and harder to hold. Gaffigan asks, "If you can't confidently hold a cheeseburger while you eat it, is it cheeseburger?"

CALENDAR: Week of June 30
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead.

NATURE: Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge 
"Sunday Morning" visits the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge in upstate New York. Videographer: Carl Mrozek.


RECAP: JUNE 30

COVER STORY: Ansly's Army | Watch Video
Ansly Damus, a 42-year-old asylum seeker from Haiti, spent over two years in jail despite having committed no crime. Ted Koppel reports on how he came to live in Melody Hart and Gary Benjamin's upstairs bedroom in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

HISTORY: The Museum of the American Revolution | Watch Video
Martha Teichner reports on the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, which features exhibits like George Washington's tent, a piece of the original North Bridge from Concord, Massachusetts, and a look at how the war changed life for African Americans and Native Americans.

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ART: Surrealism and war | Watch Video
The traveling exhibition "Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s," now at the Frist Art Museum in Nashville, explores how the real-life monstrosities of war in the mid-20th century bred metaphorical monsters in paintings and sculptures, by such artists as Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, André Masson and Joan Miró. Serena Altschul reports.

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FOOD: Custard in Milwaukee | Watch Video
Mo Rocca travels to Milwaukee, home to the highest concentration of frozen custard shops in the world, including one that's been serving since 1938. Locals Bud Selig and Bob Ueker tell Rocca about their love for the cold treat that shouldn't be confused with ice cream.

HARTMAN: Kindergarten Sign Language | Watch Video
When it was time for 6-year-old Morey Belanger to begin kindergarten, her parents had a choice: public school or a school for the deaf? They opted for the closer public school and the students have embraced their new classmate by learning sign language.

THEATER: Beyond Glory | Watch Video
Stephen Lang portrays eight Medal of Honor recipients, showing what drove them, in his one-man play "Beyond Glory." David Martin reports 

MUSIC: Rock legend Tina Turner on her voice, finding serenity and losing a son | Watch Video
The singer talks with CBS News' Gayle King about her memoir, "My Love Story," and opens up about her years with Ike Turner, falling for a younger man, Buddhism, and the suicide of her son, Craig. (This story was originally broadcast October 14, 2018.)

BOOK EXCERPT: Hear Tina Turner read the prologue from "My Love Story"

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OPINION: Tim Cook on the work still needed for LGBTQ equality | Watch Video
With Pride Parades happening across the country, Cook comments on how far gay rights have come in the 50 years since the Stonewall Riots and the road ahead          

CALENDAR: Week of June 30 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead.

NATURE: Yosemite National Park
"Sunday Morning" visits Yosemite National Park in California. Videographer: Scot Miller.


RECAP: JUNE 23

WATCH THE FULL 6/23 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Seeing red: Mankind gets closer to Mars | Watch Video
Mankind has never been closer to setting foot on Mars. NASA is completing construction of its new Mars rover, in readiness for its launch in July 2020, while SpaceX is firing prototypes of its Mars rocket engines, getting ready for short test flights in late 2020. David Pogue reports on the prognosis for manned exploration of the Red Planet.

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ALMANAC:
 Sex researcher Alfred Kinsey | Watch Video
On June 23, 1894 the biologist and professor who founded the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction was born. Jane Pauley reports. 

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FASHION: Streetwear, the latest fashion trend | Watch Video
Contributor Kelefa Sanneh, of The New Yorker magazine, reports on clothes that are a mashup of hiphop leisurewear and high fashion. He walks with designers Carine Roitfeld and Heron Preston, and Vogue Magazine's Lynn Yaeger about the bursting popularity of streetwear.

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HOLLYWOOD: Sherry Lansing, on life in Hollywood, and life since Hollywood | Watch Video
The former actress and producer, and the first woman to head a major film studio, became a role model in a male-dominated industry– and, while at the top of her game, boldly left the business altogether. Mo Rocca reports. 

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MARRIAGE:  "Something new": Surprise weddings | Watch Video
Are you the spontaneous type? Can you keep a secret? Then you might be someone to throw a "surprise wedding," with none of the angst, doting mother's advice or fighting bridesmaids to contend with. Plus, you have the fun of surprising people! Luke Burbank met an Ohio couple who sprang the big news to their guests at a party that suddenly turned matrimonial.

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HARTMAN: In a class by herself (Video)
On tiny Cuttyhunk Island in Massachusetts, 13-year-old Gwen Lynch is the only student in a one-room schoolhouse, built in 1873 to teach the children of fishermen. And this year, with Lynch leaving the island for high school, friends and family flocked to witness Cuttyhunk Elementary's last graduation ceremony ever. Steve Hartman reports. 

      
BOOKS:
 This week's New York Times bestsellers

Fiction Hardcover Bestsellers:

1. "Where the Crawdads Sing" by Delia Owens
2. "Unsolved" by James Patterson and David Ellis
3. "Mrs. Everything" by Jennifer Weiner
4. "City of Girls" by Elizabeth Gilbert
5. "Tom Clancy: Enemy Contact" by Mike Maden

Fiction Hardcover Bestsellers:

1. "Unfreedom of the Press" by Mark R. Levin
2. "Songs of America" by Jon Meacham and Tim McGraw
3. "The Pioneers" by David McCullough
4. "Howard Stern Comes Again" by Howard Stern
5. "Educated" by Tara Westover

COMICS: The chronicles of "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" host Jane Pauley interviews her husband, cartoonist Garry Trudeau, whose '60s comic strip at Yale, "Bull Tales," evolved into one of the most influential and enduring chronicles of the generational counter-culture. Now 70, Trudeau talks about his Pulitzer Prize-winning strip, and the effect his memorable characters' journey has had on him. (Originally broadcast on December 2, 2018.)

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FITNESS: Jazzercise: Fit at 50 | Watch Video
Long before crossfit became a fad and spinning a sensation, there was the dance-based workout Jazzercise, and this '80s throwback is surprisingly alive and kicking. As correspondent Michelle Miller discovered, Jazzercise founder Judi Sheppard Missett, at 75, and her multi-million-dollar company are both in great shape.

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OPINION:
 Dave Barry on learning to age more gracefully | Watch Video
Now that he is at the age when his mailbox is filled with ads for hearing aids, catheters and funerals, the humorist has some advice on how to handle turning the big seven-oh. 

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CALENDAR:
 Week of June 24 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

        
NATURE:
 Sunflowers (Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us this first weekend of summer to a field of sunflowers in Milledgeville, Georgia. Videographer: Tom Cosgrove  

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

         
NATURE UP CLOSE:
 Getting rid of the lawn mower (and your lawn, too)
Instead of spending time and money to maintain a monoculture that is actually damaging to our environment, follow these suggestions on how to let your yard go wild.


RECAP: JUNE 16

Guest Host: Lee Cowan

WATCH THE FULL JUNE 16 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: Another occupational hazard for firefighters: Cancer | Watch Video
Since 2002, almost two out of every three firefighters who died on the job died of cancer, as smoke from today's fires produces an ever-more toxic brew of chemicals. But many first responders diagnosed with cancer are being denied workers' comp benefits. Tony Dokoupil talks with firefighters who are battling more than just flames.

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GAMES:  Mining lessons from the blockbuster game Minecraft | Watch Video
One of the bestselling video games of all time has no guns or blood. Since its debut in 2009, the world-building game Minecraft has sold more than 176 million copies; more than 91 million people play it every month. But it's more than a Lego-like universe where players create or destroy things; teachers are seeing the benefits of playing Minecraft in their classrooms. David Pogue reports.

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HARTMAN:
 The gift of a foster parent (Video)
When Aurora, Colo., middle school math teacher Finn Lanning learned his 13-year-old student Damien, who was in foster care, needed a kidney transplant, the confirmed bachelor decided to do something: become a foster parent. Steve Hartman reports.

HISTORY: Building the Transcontinental Railroad | Watch Video
It was the moonshot of the 19th century – crews working East from Sacramento and West from Omaha to build the Transcontinental Railroad, meeting on May 10, 1869 at Promontory Summit, Utah. To help mark the project's 150th anniversary, Union Pacific engine #4014, built in the 1940s, has been restored, producing 7,000 horsepower as it brings the great Age of Steam back to life. John Blackstone takes a ride, and talks with descendants of Chinese immigrants who were key to completing the 1,776-mile-long railroad.

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FATHER'S DAY: 
Being a new dad, two times over (Video)
There's a steep learning curve in being a dad. It starts from Day One. But it's those early years that offer a glimpse of the future that we celebrate so fondly today: An essay by Lee Cowan.

MOVIES: "Toy Story 4" star Tim Allen on comedy and tragedy | Watch Video
Tracy Smith sits down with the comedian and star of the "Toy Story" animated features.

To watch a trailer for "Toy Story 4" click on the video player below.

Toy Story 4 | Official Trailer 2 by Pixar on YouTube

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OPINION: Jim Gaffigan on retiring from the job of being a dad | Watch Video
The comedian has taken on the job of being a father five times over, and is ready to retire.

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BUSINESS:  Bitcoin billionaires Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss | Watch Video
They became famous as the privileged pair of Harvard athletes who believe Mark Zuckerberg stole their idea for Facebook. Now, entrepreneurs Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss have shifted their focus from social media to cryptocurrency, becoming among the first bitcoin billionaires, and launching a digital currency exchange mobile app, Gemini. Correspondent Nicholas Thompson reports.

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FATHER'S DAY:  World's best dads | Watch Video
How did Father's Day come about? It was thanks to a woman, Sonora Smart Dodd, who in 1909 proposed a day to celebrate fathers, like the widowed Civil War veteran who'd raised Dodd and her five brothers. But unlike Mother's Day, the idea was slow to catch on, and it would take decades for dads to get their due. Correspondent Nikki Batiste talks with retired NFL star Tony Gonzalez, a 2019 Father of the Year Award recipient, and with photographer Dave Engledow, the self-proclaimed "World's Best Father" (and he has the pictures to prove it).

GALLERY: Photographer Dave Engledow, the "World's Best Father" 

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CALENDAR:
 Week of June 17 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Lee Cowan reports.

       
NATURE:
 Utah (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" offers us a drone's-eye view of Dead Horse Point State Park and Canyonlands National Park in Utah. Videographer: Derek Reich.

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

NATURE UP CLOSE: Wildlife and the story behind "Taco Bell's Cannon"
Judy Lehmberg explains how a misunderstanding by this classical musical newbie relates to imagery of animals on an unspoiled Earth. 

GALLERY: Summer music 2019
It's summertime - time for music at festivals and venues across the country. Photos by CBS News' Jake Barlow, Ed Spinelli and Kirstine Walton.  


RECAP: JUNE 9 

         

GUEST HOST: Mo Rocca

WATCH THE FULL JUNE 9 EPISODE!

       
COVER STORY:
 The lavender scare: How the federal government purged gay employees | Watch Video
In the 1950s the U.S. government deemed federal workers who were homosexual to be security risks and began purging them from the workforce. A new documentary looks at how the policy played out over more than four decades. Mo Rocca reports.

To watch a trailer for the documentary "The Lavender Scare," click on the video player below.

The Lavender Scare - Official Trailer by The Lavender Scare on YouTube

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PASSAGE:
 Remembering Dr. John | Watch Video
Malcolm John Rebennack Jr was a true son of New Orleans, mixing blues, jazz, rock, and faux voodoo in a musical gumbo all his own. Mo Rocca reports. 

FROM THE ARCHIVE: Dr. John, of New Orleans (Video)
Grammy-winning musician-composer-producer Malcolm John Rebennack Jr, better known as Dr. John, mixed blues, jazz, rock, and faux voodoo into a rich musical gumbo, until his passing on June 6, 2019 at age 77. In this "Sunday Morning" profile originally broadcast August 20, 2006, correspondent Russ Mitchell rode with Dr. John through New Orleans history – both musical and disaster-related – stopping to chat with one of the godfathers of the city's music scene, Allen Toussaint, and Cosimo Matassa, owner of the legendary New Orleans recording studio where Dr. John started playing as a teenager.

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ON BROADWAY: Broadway's Andrew Rannells: "Too Much Is Not Enough" | Watch Video
It's been seven years since Andrew Rannells starred in the hit Broadway show, "The Book of Mormon," earning him his first Tony Award nomination.  He has since starred in several TV series, and authored a memoir, "Too Much Is Not Enough: A Memoir of Fumbling Toward Adulthood." Faith Salie talked with Rannells about how he found the spotlight.

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: Andrew Rannells' "Too Much Is Not Enough"

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THE TONY NOMINEES:
 "Ain't Too Proud: The Life and Times of the Temptations" | Watch Video

GALLERY: Fabulous portraits of the cast of "Ain't Too Proud: The Life and Times of The Temptations"

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MUSIC: Gloria Gaynor on her "Testimony" | Watch Video
Four decades after her signature song, "I Will Survive," hit #1 and became an anthem of female endurance, 69-year-old singer Gloria Gaynor's new gospel album, "Testimony," is her own tale of survival. Anthony Mason reports.

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THE TONY NOMINEES:
 Jeff Daniels on "To Kill a Mockingbird" | Watch Video

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walter-cronkite-and-gen-dwight-eisenhower-at-american-cemetery-in-normandy-620.jpg
CBS News' Walter Cronkite and former General. Dwight D. Eisenhower visited the American Cemetery in Normandy, France, 20 years after D-Day. CBS News

D-DAY AT 75: His grandfather's war: David Eisenhower on the general and D-Day | Watch Video
David Eisenhower, grandson of the general who commanded the greatest military operation of history's most terrible war, talks with David Martin about the legacy of D-Day, and of the decisions made and responsibilities borne by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, who led nearly 160,000 Allied troops into Normandy 75 years ago.

ARCHIVE VIDEO: CBS Reports (1964): "D-Day Plus 20 Years - Eisenhower Returns to Normandy"
The Allied invasion of Nazi-controlled France on June 6, 1944 was the largest military invasion in history, involving nearly 160,000 service members arriving by ship and air at Normandy. Its success turned the tide of World War II. Two decades after D-Day, former Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was Supreme Commander in charge of the operation, returned to Normandy. Eisenhower talked with CBS News' Walter Cronkite about his experiences in June 1944, the tactical decisions behind Operation Overlord, and how British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was talked out of joining the invading forces. Eisenhower and Cronkite visited the Allies' war room on England's southern coast; the coast of France, including Pointe du Hoc and Omaha Beach; and the American military cemetery at St. Laurent-on-the-Sea. This special broadcast of "CBS Reports," featuring newsreel footage of the invasion, originally aired in 19 countries around the world on June 5, 1964.

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HARTMAN:
 The "Wow!" concert (Video)
It was an unusual outburst for a classical music concert: an audience member shouted out "Wow!" at the very end of Mozart's "Masonic Funeral Music," performed by the Handel and Haydn Society in Boston. The group's president and CEO, David Snead, was determined to find out who had broken audience protocol in such a forthright way. The answer to his query proved very surprising, as Steve Hartman discovered.

       
THE TONY NOMINEES:
 Annette Bening on "All My Sons" | Watch Video

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TELEVISION:  Kevin Bacon on career longevity, and the links that connect us all | Watch Video
The actor talks about his new Showtime series, "City on a Hill," in which he plays a corrupt federal agent in Boston. Lee Cowan reports. 

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ALMANAC:
 Cole Porter | Watch Video

Good authors, too, who once knew better words
Now only use four-letter words
Writing prose
Anything goes!

The composer of such Broadway classics as "Anything Goes" and "Kiss Me, Kate" was born on June 19, 1891. Mo Rocca reports.

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JOURNALISM: CNN's Jim Acosta on the press' role in the Trump era | Watch Video
Candidate and then President Trump has repeatedly attacked the news media, called stories he dislikes "fake news," and has lied to the public more than 10,000 times since taking office. At the same time, access to press briefings in the White House has dwindled. CNN's chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta, who has been called the "enemy of the people" by the president, says the press corps' responsibility these days is not just to call balls and strikes, but also fouls. He talks with his colleague, CBS News' White House correspondent Chip Reid, about the role of the press corps today, and about his new book, "The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America."

READ A BOOK EXCERPT:  Jim Acosta's "The Enemy of the People"

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THE TONY NOMINEES:
 Bryan Cranston on "Network" | Watch Video

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NATURE:
 Elk (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Point Reyes National Seashore in California, a safe home for Tule Elk, hunted nearly to extinction in the 1800s. Videographer: Lee McEachern.
        

WEB EXCLUSIVES:

      
CALENDAR:
 Week of June 10 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.  

NATURE UP CLOSE: Grizzlies and black bears
Judy Lehmberg on the bears of Yellowstone National Park.

TONY AWARDS: Stream songs from this year's nominated musicals, revivals
Fans of musical theater can listen to songs and excerpts from this year's nominated productions, including streams of cast albums and behind-the-scenes video.

GALLERY: Summer music 2019
It's summertime - time for music at festivals and venues across the country. Photos by CBS News' Jake Barlow, Ed Spinelli and Kirstine Walton.  


RECAP: JUNE 2

WATCH THE FULL JUNE 2 EPISODE!

COVER STORY: D-Day veterans of the air | Watch Video
A World War II-era Douglas C-47 military transport plane dubbed "Miss Montana" had been parked in a museum for nearly two decades after a career transporting firefighters in Montana. Now, with its engines rebuilt and the fuselage restored to its early glory, it is joining other veteran airplanes that saw service on D-Day 75 years ago for a trip across the Atlantic, for an anniversary flight over the beaches of Normandy. Richard Schlesinger talks with those who got Miss Montana back in the air.

GALLERY: D-Day - When the Allies turned the tide

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ART:  The delicate craft of wood carver David Esterly | Watch Video
The delicate and expressive wood carvings of sculptor David Esterly may take months, even years, to create, conjured from the subtle neurological connections between the artist's brain and the hand. Faith Salie talks with Esterly, whose craft has placed him among the greatest wood workers, and who is now facing the symptoms of ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

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MOVIES: Mindy Kaling on "Late Night," and taking nothing for granted | Watch Video
When she was a little kid, Mindy Kaling didn't see anyone on TV who looked like her, and yet she's built a career as a writer and actress who is remarkably relatable, whether it's her characters in the sitcoms "The Office" and "The Mindy Project," her bestselling books, or her new film "Late Night," which she wrote and stars in alongside Emma Thompson. Luke Burbank sits down with Kaling and finds, as talented and funny as she is, she's less adept at making pizza rolls.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Will Mindy Kaling and B.J. Novak "get back together"?
In this web exclusive, writer and actress Mindy Kaling talks to Luke Burbank about the public's fascination with her relationship with actor B.J. Novak, who played her boyfriend on the hit comedy series "The Office."

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JUSTICE: Re-making bail | Watch Video
It's estimated that at least 60% of Americans in jail today – nearly a half-million – haven't been convicted of anything but are merely being held in pre-trial detention because they can't afford to make bail. What's worse, even people who are acquitted of charges may face years paying back their bail bond fees. Now, some states, like California, are moving to end their cash bail systems. 

Lee Cowan looks at the $2 billion-a-year private bail bond industry, and talks with the founder of the Bail Project, a non-profit that gives those in need bail without added fees, as well as the executive director of Equal Justice Under Law, dedicated to scrapping the cash bail system entirely.

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PASSAGE:
 Leon Redbone and Claus von Bülow | Watch Video
It happened this past week - word of the passing of two men as different as different can be
    

MUSIC: The Jonas Brothers get a do-over | Watch Video
The Jonas Brothers' "Sucker" has been rocking the airwaves as their first-ever #1 hit. But the brothers – Nick, Kevin and Joe – have traveled long paths, both together and solo, since coming onto the scene as teens nearly 15 years ago. Tracy Smith talks with the Jonas Brothers, each now married, about family ties and their decision to regroup, produce a new album, and head out on tour.

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POLITICS: George Will, a conservative rock, unmoved by chaos | Watch Video
The Washington Post columnist and political commentator George Will has been a staunch and unshakable advocate for conservative policies for more than four decades. Calling conservatism in the Age of Trump "a persuasion without a party," he has left the Republican Party whose titular head he rejects (but not his court picks). Special correspondent Ted Koppel talks with Will about the state of politics, as well as one of the more hot-button topics of the day: baseball.

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COMMENTARY:
 Humorist David Sedaris has diverse opinions about on-screen representation | Watch Video
If an actor with legs can play a double-amputee (once his limbs are erased by a computer), where does that leave all the amputee actors?

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PASSAGE: Tiananmen Square, 30 years later | Watch Video
The Beijing massacre in which hundreds, perhaps thousands of protesters died at the hands of the army has been erased from Chinese history. Elizabeth Palmer reports. 


CALENDAR:
 Week of June 3 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Black bears (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" visits Yellowstone National Park, a playground for a mother black bear and her frolicking cubs. Videographer: Judith Lehmberg.  

WEB EXCLUSIVE:

hadestown-andre-de-shields-matthew-murphy-620.jpg
André De Shields, Amber Gray and the cast of "Hadestown," which leads this year's Tony Awards with 14 nominations. "Hadestown"/Matthew Murphy

TONY AWARDS: Stream songs from this year's nominated musicals, revivals
Fans of musical theater can listen to songs and excerpts from this year's nominated productions, including streams of cast albums and behind-the-scenes video.

RECAP: MAY 26

WATCH THE FULL MAY 26 EPISODE! 

    
COVER STORY:
  Van life: Making one's home on the open road | Watch Video
From baby boomers to millennials, some people have found a roadmap to happiness by living their lives on the open road, in RVs or converted vans. Tony Dokoupil meets a family of six who live in a converted school bus, and with Bob Wells, an oracle of online information about living on the road.

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Images featured in the story were generously provided by the following folks:

       
ALMANAC:
 The rise of Dracula | Watch Video
The immortal vampire first saw the light of day when Bram Stoker's horror novel was published on May 26, 1897. Jane Pauley reports.

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ART: Monumental women: Breaking the bronze ceiling | Watch Video
New York City's Central Park is filled with statues honoring noted historical figures, even a famous dog – and all of them are male. Nationwide, there are more than 5,000 outdoor statues of people of all sorts, but less than 8% of them are of women.  Faith Salie reports on the Monumental Women Campaign, and Equal Visibility Everywhere, two groups that say it's time to put more and more women up on a pedestal. 

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MUSIC: Teddy Abrams, the Louisville Orchestra's rock star | Watch Video
At 32, Teddy Abrams is the youngest conductor of a major orchestra in the United States, and he's done what most orchestras are desperate to do: increased the audience, young and old. Martha Teichner reports.

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BOOKS: 
"The Ballad of Huck & Miguel": Huck Finn revisited, in today's L.A. | Watch Video
Author Tim DeRoche reframes Mark Twain's story of comradeship and child-like wonderment in his contemporary tale of a boy-adventurer and an undocumented Mexican immigrant rafting down the Los Angeles River. Lee Cowan reports. 

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OF NOTE: "Sunday Morning" colleagues (Video)
What goes on behind the scenes to make "Sunday Morning" happen is anything but simple, and so we pay tribute to those who have worked for us - and many other CBS News colleagues - who are retiring. Behind every name is a story, a memory, and good reason to offer our thanks and best wishes.      

      
HARTMAN:
 A school bus driver's special delivery (Video)
School bus driver Curtis Jenkins loves delivering his young passengers to Lake Highlands Elementary in Dallas, Texas, and has inspired them by paying attention, motivating them, and handing out presents he carefully selects for each child. Steve Hartman reports.

ON BROADWAY:  Annette Bening on "All My Sons" | Watch Video
Serena Altschul talks with the actress, now a Tony nominee for her performance in the Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's "All My Sons."

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MUSIC: The War and Treaty | Watch Video
As the duo The War and Treaty, Michael Trotter Jr. and Tanya Trotter sing some of the songs Michael wrote, while serving in the Army in Iraq, as tributes to fallen comrades – songs they now perform in concerts across the country and in their debut album, "Healing Tide." Conor Knighton reports.

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OPINION: 
Scott Pelley on the American flag, and Americans' common purpose | Watch Video
The "60 Minutes" correspondent says "We the people" can only sustain a democracy when divisions do not recklessly tug at the threads holding us together.

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CALENDAR:
 Week of May 27 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead. Jane Pauley reports.

       
NATURE:
 Bears Ears National Monument (Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah, named for a pair of buttes resembling, well, bears' ears! Videographer: Scot Miller. 
      


WEB EXCLUSIVE: 

NATURE UP CLOSE: Our javelina scare
A trip through the Amazon brought "Sunday Morning" videographer Judy Lehmberg up-close-and-personal with a herd of peccaries.


RECAP: MAY 19 - "A Sunday Morning in Florence"

Jane Pauley hosts a special broadcast of "Sunday Morning" from Tuscany, sharing stories on all things Italian – art and design, traditions and culture, fashion, food, music, entertainment and history.

     
WATCH THE FULL 5/19 BROADCAST!
   

"Sunday Morning" theme in Italy 00:27

OPENING: "Ablassen" (Video)
The "Sunday Morning" theme is performed by cellist Christian Grosselfinger on the streets of Florence. 

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COVER STORY:
  Emigration, full circle: Returning to the old country | Watch Video
Mark Phillips meets with Americans whose Italian ancestors emigrated to the New World, who have themselves emigrated back to the Old World.  And thanks to Italian citizenship laws, the Italian blood that has flowed in their family's veins through generations has opened up doors to their becoming Italian citizens.

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ART:
 Michelangelo's David | Watch Video
Michelangelo's masterpiece, the 17-foot-tall statue of David, stands front-and-center at the Galleria dell'Accademia in Florence. Jane Pauley reflects on the quintessence of Renaissance art.

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A RENAISSANCE CITY:
 Florence - A history | Watch Video
For centuries the Italian city of Florence has been a hub of trade and commerce, and an historic center for art and architecture. Jane Pauley reports.

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FOOD: Creating an irresistible mozzarella | Watch Video
At the organic cheesemaker Tenuta Vannulo, in southern Italy, the specialty is fresh buffalo mozzarella. Seth Doane checks out the process of creating a simply delicious cheese.

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BOOKS:
 The birthplace of Pinocchio | Watch Video
The tiny Tuscan town of Collodi was the birthplace of Pinocchio. Created in 1881 by journalist-author Carlo Lorenzini (who took the town's name as his pen name), the wooden puppet who became a real boy was the star of a coming-of-age story much darker than the familiar Disney film. Lee Cowan reports. 

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ART: Treasures of the Uffizi (Video)
Seven years before America's Declaration of Independence, the Uffizi opened its doors to the public. Containing perhaps the greatest collection of artwork in the world, including masterpieces by Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael and Botticelli, the Florentine museum holds treasures at every turn. Jane Pauley reports.

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ART:  Florentine artisans: Preserving the traditions of Medici taste | Watch Video
Florence is one of the last cities in the world that still has a thriving culture of artisanship, with historic roots that go back 600 years. Martha Teichner reports.

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ROYALTY:
 A royal estate in Tuscany | Watch Video
The Corsini estate, Villa Le Corti, sits high atop a hillside outside Florence, in the Tuscan wine region of Chianti, on land Princess Giorgiana Corsini's family has owned since the 1300s. She talked with Jane Pauley about the rich history of one of Italy's richest families, the restoration of a great house and winery that had been left to decay for a century, and the treasures that sit behind the villa's walls.

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BOOKS: Under the Tuscan sun with author Frances Mayes | Watch Video
In 1990, American professor and poet Frances Mayes felt an irresistible urge to buy a derelict 300-year-old property. She transformed it into one of the most famous villas in Tuscany, attracting a constant stream of tourists, thanks to her bestselling memoir about restoring the house, called "Under the Tuscan Sun." The book spent more than two-and-a-half years on the bestseller list, and later became a popular film. Mayes talks with correspondent Rita Braver about her unexpected success, her adopted village of Cortona, and her latest book, "See You in the Piazza."

WEB EXTRA: Recipes from "Under the Tuscan Sun" author Frances Mayes

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MEDICINE: The world's oldest pharmacy | Watch Video
Florence's Santa Maria Novella Pharmacy, which dates back to 1221 when Dominican monks began experimenting with alchemy, is thought to be the oldest apothecary in the world. Rose water? It was invented here, as were other medicinal and aromatic innovations, as reported by Jane Pauley.

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FASHION: Brunello Cucinelli: Fashion and philosophy | Watch Video
In a country where thousands of little towns are being deserted, one village is thriving, mainly due to the work of one extraordinary man: designer Brunello Cucinelli. His company, which makes some of the finest and priciest clothing in the world, has raised the fortunes of Solomeo, restored the town's ancient buildings, and upheld the dignity of local workers by forging what has been called a "humanistic enterprise in the world of industry." Tracy Smith reports.

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FOOD:  Nutella, the spread that made hazelnuts famous | Watch Video
The rich chocolate-hazelnut creation, known to the world as Nutella, has been a staple for generations of local cooks. Seth Doane visited the Langhe region of Piedmont, Italy, where the rolling hills are covered with hazelnut trees, and with confectioners and pastry makers who bask in the delights of the hazelnut.

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MUSIC: Sting, Trudie Styler, and their summer home in Italy | Watch Video
Il Palagio, a 400-year-old villa in Tuscany, is a summer house that the singer-musician Sting, and his wife, Trudie Styler, bought for a song or two. They've fixed it up, and brought the olive groves, vineyards and vegetable gardens back to life. Sting and Trudie talk with correspondent Alina Cho about music, raising a family, and revitalizing a cherished homestead.

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ART:  Trafficking in art | Watch Video
In Florence even the street signs are pieces of art.  Playful, funny, irreverent, hundreds of them dot the landscape thanks to a street artist who goes by name Clet, a Frenchman who saw an opportunity to do something different in a place imbued in history. Jane Pauley reports.

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FOOD:  True espresso love: Attending a university of coffee | Watch Video
The vibrant southern Italian city of Naples seems to run on espresso. Seth Doane explores the Neapolitan love of coffee with tour guide Marcello Uzzi, and attends lessons at the Italian coffee powerhouse Illy's own University of Coffee in Trieste, where the highly-calibrated method of preparing the perfect cup of espresso is taught.

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NATURE:
 Tuscan countryside (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" takes us to Villa Le Corti, just outside Florence. Videographer: Mike Hernandez.


PRIMETIME SPECIAL: MAY 17

Our primetime special, "No Exit!," driven by our love of the automobile, from the perils of commuting and gridlock, to future technologies behind the wheel, airs Friday, May 17 at 9  p.m. ET/PT.

WATCH THE FULL BROADCAST! 

jane-pauley-in-ford-mustang-shelby-gt500-620.jpg
"Sunday Morning" host Jane Pauley, decked out in a Ford Mustang Shelby GT500.  CBS News

Thank you to the Riverfields Estate in Rumson, New Jersey, which hosted taping for our "No Exit!" special.

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OPENING: Mo Rocca on the dilemma of traffic (Video)
Stuck in gridlock, like millions of other drivers? Mo Rocca has suggestions on how to get away from it all, none very practical.

TECHNOLOGY: Gridlock - Seeking 21st century solutions to an age-old problem | Watch Video
As Americans spend an estimated 97 hours a year stuck in traffic, costing tens of billions in lost productivity, answers to our traffic nightmares are being explored, both high-tech and old-school, from a Hyperloop magnetic transportation system reaching speeds of hundreds of miles per hour, to gondola rides above congested city streets. Lee Cowan reports.

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TECHNOLOGY:  The road to self-driving cars | Watch Video
A few years ago there were many headlines about self-driving cars – cars that would never get drowsy, never get impaired by alcohol, and never be distracted by cell phones. Well, the future of self-driving vehicles is closer than you think, as David Pogue finds out when he surveys a landscape in which the drivers are not people.

WEB EXTRA VIDEO: Lyft co-founder on why your car is expendable
Self-driving cars may reshape more than our streets. In this web exclusive, correspondent David Pogue talks to David Zimmer, co-founder and president of the Lyft ride-sharing service, about the future of transportation, and what will change as new technologies make us less and less dependent on owning a car. 

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WORK: Crazy commutes: Employing alternative methods to beat traffic | Watch Video
Traffic engineer Sam Schwartz, who's credited with the dubious honor of coining the term "gridlock," believes the current traffic situation has never been this bad. So, is it any surprise that some commuters have turned to more imaginative methods of transportation to work, like a unicycle, or a self-built, foldable boat? Susan Spencer reports. 

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MUSIC:
 Tuning in to the evolution of car radios | Watch Video
From pop hits to preachers, and pretty much everything in-between, the car radio has been part of our lives for almost 100 years. Nancy Giles talks with a familiar radio voice, "Cousin Brucie," and historian Donna Halper about the evolution of entertainment on the road.

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DRIVER'S SEAT:  In the slow lane with Jay Leno | Watch Video
Traffic during rush hour in Washington, D.C., is among the worst in the nation – so lethargic that even a venerable Model T Ford, driven by comedian and car aficionado Jay Leno, would have to slow down to keep up. Special correspondent Ted Koppel joins Leno as he slowly makes his way through the nation's capital, while offering a discourse on America's transportation history.

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POSTCARD FROM JAPAN:  Street art: Japanese manhole covers | Watch Video
On the streets of Japan, you may find remarkable artwork right under your feet. The Japanese have turned black metal manhole covers into well-rounded works of design. Nearly every city and town now has its very own manhole covers, usually based on a local claim to fame, drawing fans (called "manholers") in search of photos or copies of these unique pieces of public art. Ben Tracy reports.

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TECHNOLOGY: Flying cars: Ready to take off | Watch Video
After decades of promises, flying cars are finally becoming real. Richard Schlesinger looks at what may soon be taking off on the highway, which look more like helicopters than what "The Jetsons" promised.

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TRAVEL:  Traveling America's scenic byways | Watch Video
It's easy to get caught up in getting to where you want to go, while missing all the beauty and intrigue you pass along the journey. Conor Knighton explores America's national scenic byways.

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COMMENTARY:
 Jim Gaffigan on that unavoidable certainty of life: Traffic | Watch Video
The comedian will do anything to avoid coping with traffic, especially commuting (which is just a gentle renaming of traffic).

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RECAP: MAY 12

WATCH THE FULL MAY 12 EPISODE!

      
COVER STORY:
 Teaching anti-vax parents to trust science and the MMR vaccine | Watch Video
The World Health Organization listed vaccine hesitancy – when parents delay or withhold vaccines for their children – as one of the top ten health risks for 2019. Now, with more than 700 confirmed cases of measles in 23 states, public health officials are scrambling to put a stop to it. Dr. Jon LaPook reports on using science as an antidote to misinformation about vaccines.

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HOLIDAYS:
 Mothers Day

LANDMARKS: A new museum for Lady Liberty | Watch Video
This week the $100 million Statue of Liberty Museum opens on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. It tells the story of the creation of Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi's statue back in the 1800s – a gift of France – and also the story of how it became a symbol of America, of inclusion, of liberty. Martha Teichner reports.

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RADIO: The evolving Howard Stern | Watch Video
Over the past 13 years, Howard Stern helped SiriusXM satellite radio grow from a fledgling experiment into a 33-million-subscriber empire. But Stern, who made a name for himself as a potty-mouthed shock jock, has evolved – as a celebrity interviewer and as a person. He talks with Tracy Smith about his new book of interviews, "Howard Stern Comes Again"; his psychotherapy; a health scare that demonstrated he "wasn't Superman"; and how he and his wife are guardian angels to a thousand rescue cats.

BOOK EXCERPT: Howard Stern on how therapy changed him

EXTENDED TRANSCRIPT: Read more from Tracy Smith's interview with Howard Stern

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TRAVEL:  Up, up and away at the TWA Hotel | Watch Video
When Trans World Airlines went bankrupt in 2001, it was the end of an aviation era – and of architect Eero Saarinen's classic TWA Terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, one of the most distinctive buildings in the world. Rescued from the bulldozer by building preservationists, the magnetic terminal that once drew air travelers has now been transformed into the nostalgic TWA Hotel. Kris Van Cleave checks in. 

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JUSTICE: The Central Park Five speak | Watch Video
With a new Netflix series about their case premiering, the men who came to be known as the Central Park Five share with correspondent Maurice DuBois the many costs of a false conviction. 

To watch a trailer for "When They See Us," directed by Ana DuVernay, click on the video player below:

When They See Us | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix by Netflix on YouTube

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SUNDAY PROFILE: "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek on his cancer diagnosis | Watch Video
For 35 years Alex Trebek has hosted nearly 8,000 episodes of the game show "Jeopardy!" and won six Emmy Awards. And while contestant James Holzhauer's record-setting streak has been making headlines of late, the biggest news from the show has been Trebek's fight against pancreatic cancer. He talked with Jane Pauley about his chemotherapy, the crippling pain, and his determination not to miss a day of work.

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MILITARY: Life lessons and war stories from Admiral William H. McRaven | Watch Video
Admiral William McRaven, now retired, thought commanding the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound would be the crowning achievement of his 37 years as a Navy SEAL, until he gave a 2014 commencement speech at the University of Texas at Austin that went viral – a lesson in personal responsibility that spoke to millions across the globe and became a bestseller, "Make Your Bed." David Martin talks with Admiral McRaven about the long, long road from making your bed to missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.

READ AN EXCERPT: "Sea Stories" by Admiral William H. McRaven

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