Remembering Karl Lagerfeld, Peter Tork and Stanley Donen

passage-lagerfeld-tork-donen-620.jpg

Fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, The Monkee's Peter Tork, and film director Stanley Donen.

CBS News

It happened this past week ... the loss of three showmen in very different worlds.

       
Karl Lagerfeld
was a giant in fashion, chosen in 1983 to update the legendary house of Coco Chanel, as he once recalled for our Rita Braver:

"Chanel was something dowdy for middle-aged women who had no sense for fashion or not the bodies to wear it," he said.

Lagerfeld turned Chanel's sagging fortunes around, and he remained its creative director until his death in Paris this past Tuesday.

 Always quotable, he once observed that "Sweatpants are a sign of defeat."

Karl Lagerfeld was widely believed to be 85.


       
Peter Tork
was a struggling club musician when he won a spot on "The Monkees" TV show, which premiered in 1966.

Tork joined co-stars Micky Dolenz, Mike Nesmith, and the late Davy Jones as members of a quirky rock band. But there was nothing funny about Tork's reaction to the producers' reliance on studio musicians for The Monkees' early records. As he told "Sunday Morning" correspondent Anthony Mason in 2016:

"I was mortified. And they were doing 'Clarksville,' and I wrote a counterpoint – I had studied music – and I brought it to them, and they said, 'No, no. You don't understand.  This is the record. It's all done. We don't need you.'"

But by their third album, The Monkees were performing almost all their own music ... and even after the show went off the air in 1968, The Monkees occasionally reunited for tours.

Peter Tork was 77.


         
And we learned this Oscar weekend of the death of Stanley Donen, the co-director of "Singin' in the Rain," among others.

An accomplished song-and-dance man, Donen accepted an honorary Oscar in 1998 as only he could: dancing "Cheek to Cheek" with his statuette.

Stanley Donen was 94.

Stanley Donen Receives an Honorary Award: 1997 Oscars by Oscars on YouTube

        
Story produced by Trey Sherman.