North Korea summit: What's at stake during Trump's meeting with Kim Jong Un?

SINGAPORE -- President Trump arrived in Singapore poised to make history at the summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Mr. Trump met with Singapore's prime minister before retreating to his hotel for more preparation.

"President Trump is going into this meeting with confidence, a positive attitude and eagerness for real progress," Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said.

Kim spent the hours before the summit playing tourist. His trip to Singapore is the farthest he's traveled since taking power in 2011.

Officials from both countries have been laying the groundwork for the two leaders' discussions. The U.S. is looking for a verifiable dismantling of North Korea's nuclear weapons program. In return, the Trump administration may offer Kim sanctions relief and security assurances.

Mr. Trump is not expected to address the North Korean dictator's human rights record.  

President Trump -- Singapore

President Trump steps off his plane as he arrives at Paya Lebar Air Base in Singapore, ahead of a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on June 10, 2018.

Reuters

"Mr. Trump recognizes Kim's desire for security and is prepared to ensure that a North Korea free of weapons of mass destruction is also a secure North Korea," Pompeo said.

The summit has drawn thousands of journalists and international observers. Former NBA star Dennis Rodman, who has developed a friendship with Kim, even arrived on Monday.

The summit will begin with a handshake followed by 45 minutes of one-on-one talks with only translators present, then a meeting with advisers and a working lunch. Both leaders will depart afterward -- the president will leave more than a half day earlier than anticipated.

The summit comes after a rocky meeting in Canada with longstanding U.S. allies. Over the weekend, the president clashed with leaders of the G7 summit -- all long-time U.S. allies -- over trade and tariffs.

"Canadians are polite," said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. "We're reasonable. But we also will not be pushed around."

Peter Navarro, a top Trump trade official called Trudeau's comments, made after the president departed, an outrage.

"There's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with President Donald J. Trump," he said.