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Gov. Kathy Hochul, Congressman Lee Zeldin projected winners in New York gubernatorial primary election

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Kathy Hochul fends off challenges from Tom Suozzi, Jumaane Williams
Kathy Hochul fends off challenges from Tom Suozzi, Jumaane Williams 02:59

NEW YORK Gov. Kathy Hochul and Congressman Lee Zeldin will go toe-to-toe to win the votes of New Yorkers in November.

Hochul is the first woman to win the Democratic nomination for governor.

Web Extra: N.Y. Gov. Democratic Primary Debate | Republican Primary Debate

CLICK HERE for our voter guide.  

Check below for the latest updates.   

 

Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks with Chris Wragge and Mary Calvi after Primary win

Gov. Kathy Hochul chats with Chris Wragge and Mary Calvi after Primary win 06:51

Gov. Kathy Hochul spoke with CBS2's Chris Wragge after her historic win, becoming the Democratic party's first female nominee for governor.

By CBS New York Team
 

Experts break down primary election results

Gov. Kathy Hochul and Rep. Lee Zeldin won their party's nominations with a large percentage of the vote. 

Political strategist Javier Lacayo and Robert George, from the Bloomberg editorial board, spoke with CBS2's Mary Calvi and Chris Wragge about the results. 

Experts break down New York primary election results 04:03

Watch what they had to say in the video. 

By CBS New York Team
 

A closer look at some key Assembly races

The races for state Assembly were also closely watched. 

Closer look at some key New York Assembly races 00:39

The campaigns turned into a faceoff between Mayor Eric Adams, who supported the incumbents, and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

By CBS New York Team
 

Lee Zeldin fends off Astorino, Giuliani, and Wilson

The Republican winner in the New York gubernatorial primary is Rep. Lee Zeldin, after facing off against three other candidates. 

As CBS2's Elijah Westbrook reports, Zeldin finished the night with more than 43% of the votes. He spoke to his supporters Tuesday night in Nassau County, giving them a preview of what to expect on the road to the November election. 

Lee Zeldin projected winner of New York GOP gubernatorial primary 02:35

"Are we ready to fire Kathy Hochul? This November, the state of New York one-party rule will end. Kathy Hochul will get fired," Zeldin said. 

It's a bold statement coming from the Long Island congressman in his victory speech. 

"We will restore balance and common sense to Albany again," Zeldin said. 

A number of Republican supporters from the state attended Zeldin's campaign headquarters, sending a message of what it's calling unity as they turn their attention to November. 

It was a close one at first. Polls early Tuesday night showed the race had tightened between Andrew Giuliani and Zeldin before Zeldin came out as winner. 

Andrew's father, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, despite being at the center of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot hearings, campaign for his son and joined him at the podium. 

"This was a spirited race, and I want to first and foremost congratulate my three competitors. And I would like to urge, really, everybody, really urge everybody in this room, to get behind the next governor of the state of New York, Lee Zeldin," Andrew Giuliani said. 

GOP candidate Harry Wilson conceded as well following Zeldin's win, releasing a statement that reads, in part, "while I, of course, am very disappointed in the results tonight, I am proud to have given this uphill battle everything I could in the time that we had."

Rob Astorino promoted unity in his concession speech, saying "I entered this race because our state is in crisis. It still is. I congratulate Lee Zeldin on his victory and I wish him well. Kathy Hochul has to go."

And now it's the race to the November election. Zeldin says he will make it his mission to focus on reducing crime, and lowering taxes. 

By Elijah Westbrook
 

Hochul fends off challenges from Suozzi, Williams

Kathy Hochul automatically became governor when she replaced Andrew Cuomo.

This time, she got this far on her own. 

"I stand on the shoulders of generations of women. Generations of women who constantly had to bang up against that glass ceiling," Hochul said while celebrating her victory. 

Kathy Hochul fends off challenges from Tom Suozzi, Jumaane Williams 02:59

She's breaking that glass ceiling. 

"To the women of New York: This one's for you," Hochul said. 

About an hour after the polls closed Tuesday night, Hochul made history, becoming the first woman to accept the party nomination at the top of the ticket running for governor. She talked about her determination to protect her New Yorkers from Supreme Court decision, including abortion rights that were overturned. 

"New York state is a safe harbor for America's women. You come here," she said. 

Hochul was also overjoyed for her running mate, Antonio Delgado, who won the primary for lieutenant governor. 

"This is the fight of our live. It's a generational fight," Delgado said. 

New York politicians jumped on the bandwagon, including Mayor Eric Adams

"This is our moment, Democrats. This is our opportunity, Democrats. Let's move our country and our city in the right direction. Let's win this fight in November," Adams said. 

Bowing out gracefully were Hochul's former contenders. 

"I congratulated her on a her hard work, and her disciplined campaign, and look forward to working together in the future to try and help our state," said Rep. Tom Suozzi

"We have to - history is looking at us right now, saying don't make the same mistakes. The future is looking at us and saying please don't forget about us in this moment. We can do this together if we stand together," said New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams

When Hochul spoke to reporters after her acceptance speech, she expressed a lot of optimism about the future of the Democratic party in New York. 

By John Dias
 

Harry Wilson concedes

Harry Wilson, one of the candidates vying for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, released the following statement late Tuesday:

"When I entered this race just four months ago, I did so because I saw a once-in-a-generation opportunity to fix this state. I believed that, if I could win the primary, I would be in the best position to win in November and drive transformational change in Albany for all New Yorkers. While I, of course, am very disappointed in the results tonight, I am proud to have given this uphill battle everything I could in the time that we had - and I would do it all again. The future of our country and our state is just too important to not stand up and fight. I want to deeply thank all of the New Yorkers who believed in our vision and rallied to our cause to Turnaround New York. Tonight may be the end of one journey, but tomorrow marks a far more blessed milestone as I celebrate my 25 year anniversary with my amazing wife, Eva, and our four incredible daughters."     

By CBS New York Team
 

Antonio Delgado projected winner in Democratic race for lieutenant governor

Antonio Delgado projected winner in Democratic race for lt. governor 00:57

The Associated Press is projecting Antonio Delgado as the winner in the Democratic race for lieutenant governor.

Delgado spoke at Gov. Kathy Hochul's headquarters Tuesday night.

"This is the fight of our lives. It's a generational fight. This regressive and reactionary order is trying to reassert itself in this country, and all people, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation or economic status, must stand together. Our democracy depends on it," he said.

Delgado is a former congressman from the Hudson Valley.

Hochul appointed him as her running mate after former Lt. Gov. Brian Benjamin was arrested on federal campaign finance fraud charges.

By CBS New York Team
 

Andrew Giuliani concedes in race for Republican gubernatorial nomination

Andrew Giuliani concedes in race for Republican governor nomination 01:33

Congressman Lee Zeldin has the support of Andrew Giuliani, who conceded Tuesday night.

Though recent polls showed the race had tightened between Giuliani and Zeldin recently, Zeldin came out the winner.

As CBS2's Alice Gainer reports, his campaign headquarters was packed with cheering supporters as early returns had Giuliani in the lead, but about an hour later, Zeldin took over and his lead grew.

The 36-year-old's father, former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, who despite being at the center of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot hearings campaigned for his son, joined him at the podium Tuesday night at the Women's National Republican Club in Midtown.

"This was spirited race, and I wanna first and foremost congratulate my three competitors ... And I would like to urge, really, urge everybody in this room to get behind the next governor of the state of New York, Lee Zeldin," Andrew Giuliani said.

He spent most of his speech throwing his support behind Zeldin. He also took several shots at Gov. Kathy Hochul and says he's not done yet.

By Alice Gainer
 

Zeldin is projected winner for Republican nomination for governor

Zeldin is projected winner for Republican nomination for governor 02:06

Congressman Lee Zeldin, who is projected to win the Republican nomination, spoke to supporters in Nassau County on Tuesday night.

During his victory speech, he talked about what to expect when it comes to the platforms leading up to the election in November. As CBS2's Kevin Rincon reports, Zeldin expects to focus on crime and taxes.

"Are we ready to fire Kathy Hochul?" Zeldin asked supporters, who cheered in response. "This, this November in the state of New York, one party rule will end. Kathy Hochul will get fired. We will restore balance and common sense to Albany again."

A number of Republicans from throughout the state were at Zeldin's campaign headquarters. The Republican Party has been sending a message of unity as they turn their attention to November.

"I see it as being a big victory if we work together. Again, we have to hustle to really get every vote," said former congressman Peter King.

"He's a combat war veteran, served the United States Army. He knows state issues, he was a state senator, and he's a United States Congressman, he knows how to deal with Washington, so I think he was the head-and-shoulders best candidate that we had," said Nassau County Executive Bruce Blakeman.

By Kevin Rincon
 

Gov. Kathy Hochul makes history after winning Democratic nomination

Gov. Kathy Hochul makes history after winning Democratic nomination 02:24

Gov. Kathy Hochul made history Tuesday night, becoming the first woman to accept the Democratic Party nomination at the top of the ticket running for governor.

"I stand on the shoulders of generations of women, generations of women who constantly had to bang up against that glass ceiling. To the women of New York, this one's for you," she said.

Hochul wore suffragette white, accepting the nomination about an hour after the polls closed. She talked about her determination to protect New Yorkers from Supreme Court decisions, including one that overturned the right to an abortion.

The governor was also Lt. Gov. Antonio Delgado won his primary, as well.

"And all those who said it couldn't be done, well, guess what? He just did it. So I look forward to working with him for many, many years to come," Hochul said.

New York politicians jumped on the bandwagon.

"If you're doing the right thing and you persist, God will reward you and you will succeed. Are we doing the right thing?" Sen. Chuck Schumer said, drawing cheers from the crowd.

"We have a lot to celebrate tonight. I don't want you to lose the importance of this moment, but we are electing Kathy Hochul as our first female governor to the state of New York," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said. "She's going to be a voice for women, a voice for equality, a voice for justice for all New Yorkers."

"This is our moment, Democrats. This is our opportunity, Democrats. Let's move our country and our city in the right direction. Let's win this fight in November. Thank you very much," Mayor Eric Adams said.

CBS2 political reporter Marcia Kramer says when Hochul spoke to reporters after her acceptance speech, she expressed a lot of optimism about the future of the Democratic Party in New York state.

By Marcia Kramer
 

Andrew Giuliani speaks after losing bid for Republican nomination

Andrew Giuliani speaks after losing bid for Republican nomination 09:36

Andrew Giuliani spoke Tuesday night after Congressman Lee Zeldin was projected to win the Republican nomination for governor of New York.

By CBS New York Team
 

Gov. Hochul speaks after being projected winner

Gov. Hochul speaks after being projected winner for Democratic nom 09:39

Gov. Kathy Hochul spoke at her campaign headquarters on Tuesday night after she was projected to win the Democratic nomination for governor of New York.

By CBS New York Team
 

Antonio Delgado speaks after being projected winner

Antonio Delgado speaks after being projected winner in lt. gov. race 06:23

Antonio Delgado spoke at Gov. Kathy Hochul's campaign headquarters on Tuesday night after he was projected to win the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor of New York.

By CBS New York Team
 

AP projects Congressman Lee Zeldin has won Republican nomination for governor

The Associated Press projects that Congressman Lee Zeldin has won the Republican nomination for governor in the New York primary election.

By CBS New York Team
 

AP projects Antonio Delgado wins Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor

AP projects Antonio Delgado winner for lt. gov. in Democratic primary 00:28

The Associated Press is projecting Antonio Delgado has won the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor of New York.

Republican lieutenant governor candidate Alison Esposito was uncontested in the primary race.

By CBS New York Team
 

Alice Gainer reports from Andrew Giuliani's headquarters

Andrew Giuliani makes last-minute campaign stops on Primary Day 02:04

New York Republican gubernatorial candidate Andrew Giuliani was busy making last-minute campaign stops Tuesday.

The most recent polls have shown Giuliani gaining on frontrunner Long Island Congressman Lee Zeldin, down just 2% at 23% to Zeldin's 25% in a SurveyUSA poll last week.

Joined by his baby daughter and wife early Tuesday morning, Giuliani cast his ballot at P.S. 89 in Battery Park City. He also made several other stops at polling centers in Queens.

Giuliani, who served as an aide in former president Donald Trump's White House, has often repeated the baseless claims that Trump won the 2020 election.

Giuliani says he wants a return to previous law enforcement policies, like "Broken Windows" and "Stop, Question and Frisk." He also says he wants to end bail reform and COVID mandates and is an opponent of abortion rights.

While voting, he noted the tight race, saying, "For us,  we're looking at real red areas. We're looking to make sure we get the people out in Staten Island, where we had a rally last night, in Erie County, Monroe, Onondaga. For us, I love the way the numbers are."

His father, former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, has been out stumping for his son and was at the Women's National Republican Club in Midtown on Tuesday night, despite being at the center of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot hearings.

Andrew Giuliani, 36, has never held elected office before.

By Alice Gainer
 

Kevin Rincon reports from Congressman Lee Zeldin's headquarters

Congressman Lee Zeldin makes his case to Republican voters 02:04

As CBS2's Kevin Rincon reports, there were plenty of opportunities for these candidates to make their cases to voters.

For Congressman Lee Zeldin, he's gotten the backing of the Republican Party and has tried to make himself the frontrunner, so his camp has felt an advantage from that standpoint, but this could very well be a close race.

As Zeldin voted Tuesday morning, the polling site, like sites all across the state, were not quite as packed as many would have hoped to see, which does create some uncertainty.

"It's going to be a lower turnout all across the entire state. We'll see it on both the Republican side and Democratic side," Zeldin said.

"It's a four-way primary. It's in the middle of the summer. People still are not used to this calendar," said Nick Langworthy, chairman of the New York Republican State Committee. "Getting people to the polls is a real heavy lift to get people to interrupt what they're are doing. We're on the verge of the Fourth of July holiday. People are going through high school graduations

One thing Langworthy did say is that turnout has been strong on Long Island and that could very well favor Zeldin, but speaking to those at his headquarters Tuesday night, even his own supporters know anything can happen.

By Kevin Rincon
 

AP projects Gov. Kathy Hochul has won Democratic nomination for governor

AP: Kathy Hochul projected winner of Democratic nomination for gov. 01:40

The Associated Press is projecting that Gov. Kathy Hochul has won the Democratic nomination for governor in the New York primary election.

CBS2 political reporter Marcia Kramer says there was an air of excitement and victory at Hochul's campaign even before the AP called the race. In fact, they started the speaking program minutes after the polls closed.

"If you're doing the right thing and you persist, God will reward you and you will succeed. Are we doing the right thing?" Sen. Chuck Schumer said, drawing cheers from the crowd.

"We have a lot to celebrate tonight. I don't want you to lose the importance of this moment, but we are electing Kathy Hochul as our first female governor to the state of New York," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said. "She's going to be a voice for women, a voice for equality, a voice for justice for all New Yorkers."

By CBS New York Team
 

Jennifer McLogan reports from Congressman Tom Suozzi's headquarters

Congressman Tom Suozzi trying to unseat Gov. Kathy Hochul 01:55

Congressman Tom Suozzi is one of the Democratic contenders trying to unseat Gov. Kathy Hochul.

"You believe a centrist should win and that you are that person," CBS2's Jennifer McLogan said.

"I'm a common sense Democrat. I'm not going to pander to the far left, I'm not going to back down to the right, and if people want to address crime, the highest taxes in America, help our kids in the troubled schools and clean up the corruption in Albany, I'm the person. Especially if you want to win in November," Suozzi said.

Suozzi says his involvement in the bipartisan Problem-Solvers Caucus in Congress shows he can work across the political aisle. He calls reducing crime his number one priority, wants stronger enforcement of the Red Flag law and wants to cut income taxes by 10%.

He is appealing to the more moderate Cuomo Democrats but is progressive on abortion and the environment.

Suozzi calls Gov. Kathy Hochul's judgement "suspect" due to her huge cash subsidy provided to the Buffalo Bills' new NFL stadium upstate and because her first lieutenant governor, Brian Benjamin, had to resign amid corruption charges.

By Jennifer McLogan
 

Polls close across New York

Polls have closed across New York for the Primary Election. For the latest results as they come in, click here.

By CBS New York Team
 

Recent Supreme Court rulings loom large as New Yorkers head to the polls

Supreme Court rulings loom large as New Yorkers vote in primaries 03:24

New York political contests are always intense, but the specter of the Supreme Court rulings overturning abortion and the state's strict gun laws are giving voters even more to consider as they decide who they want to represent them at the top of the Republican and Democratic tickets.

As CBS2 political reporter Marcia Kramer reports, Gov. Kathy Hochul talked about the rulings as she asked members of her party to make her their nominee.

"They know, with everything that's on the line, is to make sure that we have someone elected today, a candidate for governor, who will absolutely win in November. We cannot take a chance that this state could fall into Republican hands," she said.

Hochul is making the case that as the state's first female governor, she is the best person to guarantee the rights of women to get abortions in New York and to pass legislation to limit the effect of the Supreme Court decision striking down the state's gun laws.

As she campaigned at a West Side subway stop, she demonstrated an extraordinary ability to bring people together. After all, who else could seek voters with both Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney and Congressman Jerry Nadler by her side? The two warring lawmakers are running against each other in the August congressional primary.

"If you want to change things in New York state, it's a 'no-braina,' vote for Suozzi-Reyna," Democratic challenger Tom Suozzi said, with a play on words referring to his lieutenant governor running mate, Diana Reyna.

The plug is an important one because lieutenant governor candidates run separately in the primary. The race is hotly contested between: Reyna; Hochul's running mate, Antonio Delgado, and Ana Maria Archila, who is running with Jumaane Williams.

Williams brought his newborn baby to the polls as he cast his ballot, as did Republican Andrew Giuliani.

"Remember, come on out and vote today. We got 'til 9 p.m. 'til the polls close. The most important thing we can do as Americans is to come on out and cast our vote," Giuliani said.

Low turnout is a big concern this Primary Day.

Lee Zeldin, the official designee of the Republican Party, is also worried about turnout as he trained his bazookas not on his three GOP challengers but on the woman he hopes to face in November.

"She referred to herself as the mother of New York's 62 counties. That's just not the way that I view the position. I don't lust power and control. For me, the thrill of being in that position, of being governor of the state of New York, is to return power to the people of New York," he said.

The other two candidates in the hard-fought primary predicting they will prevail.

"It's been a lot of shifting in this race in the last two weeks when people really focus, paying attention," Rob Astorino said.

"Our turnaround plan is focused on three things:  crime, taxes and cost of living," Harry Wilson said. "In that turnaround plan, we will cut income taxes and property taxes 20% for all New Yorkers."

Meanwhile, the primary season is not over for New York voters. Congressional races and state senate primaries are on Aug. 23. That's when you'll see whether Congresswoman Maloney, Congressman Nadler or one of their challengers gets to be the Democratic nominee for that newly redrawn Upper Manhattan seat.

By Marcia Kramer
 

Voter turnout a major worry for gubernatorial candidates

Voter turnout a concern in New York's Primary Elections 03:18

As CBS2 political reporter Marcia Kramer explains, if there was one thing on the minds of all the gubernatorial candidates Tuesday, it was voter turnout. The three Democrats and four Republicans seeking their party's designation are worrying about getting their supporters out on a beautiful summer day when thoughts of a trip to the beach competed with a trip to the polls.

"It's going to be a lower turnout all across the entire state. We'll see it on both the Republican side and Democratic side. You have a primary that's between school letting out last week, July Fourth coming up next week," Long Island Congressman Lee Zeldin said.

Zeldin is hoping that his designation as the official candidate of the Republican Party will get his supporters to the polls and provide the winning margin that will allow him to take on Gov. Kathy Hochul in the November election.

Andrew Giuliani, who walked into the voting booth carrying his baby daughter, Grace, is hoping name recognition sways Republican voters.

"It's gonna be all about who comes out to vote," he said.

Rob Astorino is touting his experience as the former Westchester County Executive.

"We're ready to turn this state around and, truthfully, I say this is going to be the revenge of the normal people, you know, of all political stripes who are just fed up with the chaos," he said.

"I couldn't be more excited. I think we are peaking at the right time. Our message of being an outsider and a turnaround expert to actually fix this broken state, not just another politician, I think is resonating across the state," business turnaround specialist Harry Wilson said.

Low turnout is certainly a worry.

Out of the 8.5 million registered Democrats and Republicans who can vote in the primary, 178,223 voters took advantage of the state's 10-day early voting program.

Candidates voting with their families was popular Tuesday.

Jumaane Williams also brought his newborn into the polling place as he cast his ballot in the Democratic primary. Tom Suozzi's wife and kids also came as he cast his ballot.

"There's going to be a remarkably low turnout today in this election. Everybody who shows up to vote will have a big voice in this race," Suozzi said. "I've got 9,000 contacts in my phone. I'm going to contact every single one and make sure they get out to vote today."

Hochul, who replaced former governor Andrew Cuomo when he resigned during a sexual harassment scandal, is hoping to win a full four-year term as the first woman to ever hold the post.

"It's a weight on my shoulders. It's what I embrace. I'm honored to be in this position, and I see a lot of mothers who want me to meet their little girls and say, 'This is the first woman governor. You can be her some day, too,' and that's all I want to do, is open that door wide open," Hochul said.

By Marcia Kramer
 

Voters tell CBS2 what issues made them vote the way they did

Polls are open in New York for the first of two summer primaries. On Tuesday, voters will decide their candidates for governor, lieutenant governor and Assembly.

Voters that spoke to CBS2's John Dias had done their homework. While many of them said they know no politician is perfect, they also know the reasons why they're voting for their candidate, and the issues they want to see resolved.

Using their direct link to democracy, New Yorkers far and wide were coming out to cast their vote on Primary day.

On the ballot is the race for governor. On the Democratic side, Gov. Kathy Hochul is running against Congressman Tom Suozzi and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. On the Republicans ballot is former Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino, Andrew Giuliani, businessman Harry Wilson and Congressman Lee Zeldin.

New York primary voters head to the polls 02:45

Voters said they know why they're voting the way they are, with top issues on their minds.

"The guns and killing of our children," one said.

"Immigrant rights are key. Workers' rights," another said.

Maria Gervasi of the Belmont section of the Bronx said she voted for the politician she thinks will do the most to help get a handle on growing inflation.

"You can't buy anything," Gervasi said. "Shopping used to take me 20 minutes. Now, I'm there an hour, looking at this price and price, and that's not fair."

Political experts predict voter turnout this year could increase, following two recent decisions by the Supreme Court, one on guns and the other on abortion rights.

"I think the country is at its most dangerous moments in its history," one voter said.

Ester Fuchs, a Columbia University professor, said she thinks the court's decisions could rally complacent Democrats.

"Both the guns issue and the abortions issue was really going to shore up Democratic candidates in New York, even in the national races," Fuchs said.

It's what got Bronx resident Sheryl Barrett to the polls.

"I just thought that I had to come out here and vote today," Barrett said.

She added she's thinking about what her family members went through in the past, and how she wants to ensure more rights don't fade in the future.

"I thought about my ancestors and what they went through for us to get out here and vote," Barrett said.

Dias has checked in at four different polling places so far Tuesday, with some busier than others. However, everyone was excited to let their voices be heard through their vote. 

By John Dias
 

Expert breaks down the key races

Usually, there's a low turnout for primary elections, but with two major Supreme Court decision happening recently, experts think the changes will surely drive more people to the polls. 

It's a big day for New York - primary day. On the Democratic side, Gov. Kathy Hochul is running against Rep. Tom Suozzi and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. 

Recent Supreme Court decisions expected to boost turnout for primary day 03:51

Republicans Rob Astorino, Andrew Giuliani, Harry Wilson and Rep. Lee Zeldin are facing off. 

Many issues are on the minds of voters, like the economy and crime. 

"We know the economy always jumps to the top of the pack in national. And crime always jumps to the top in local and city. So I think we're in a wide open space here," said Columbia University professor Eshter Fuchs. 

When voters head to the polls, two recent decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court - one on guns, and the other on abortion rights -will also make all the difference, increasing turnout, which could change the end result. 

"Kathy Hochul represents that position well, so they have no need to reconsider their vote choice on the basis," Fuchs said. "The Republican primary is a different story. I think there's there is a sense that the voters in the Republican primary will be mostly Trumpian. People who tend to be at the extreme ends of the ideological spectrum are more likely to turn out in primaries. So Lee Zeldin... he's got to count on the Rockefeller Republicans not turning out in the primary for him to keep his lead. And if they do, I think he is going to be in for a rude Election Day, meaning he may not win."

Zeldin, who is the official GOP nominee, also has to worry about losing voters to Giuliani. 

"Well, this is an interesting question about who Andrew Giuliani's base is. So he and Zeldin really are fighting for the same voter," Fuchs said. 

And if more moderate to liberal Republicans, known as "Rockefeller Republicans," show up, it's a win for Wilson. 

"Wilson will benefit," Fuchs said. "He's the moderate." 

State Assembly primaries are also on the ballot, where Eric Adams and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are both looking to flex their political muscles. 

Adams is backing incumbents, and AOC is hoping to best Adams by supporting insurgents and "Defund the Police" candidates like former aide Jonathan Soto against Assemblyman Michael Benedetto, and Delsenia Glover over Harlem Assemblywoman Inez Dinkins. 

"They could totally draw blood and this is, you know, the reckoning moment, really. I think this is really something to pay attention to," Fuchs said. 

Hochul already voted for herself back on June 18th, the first day early voting started in New York. And it was the first time she could vote for herself for governor, after she automatically replaced Andrew Cuomo. 

By John Dias
 

Watch: Republican primary debate and post-debate analysis

Republican primary debate for New York governor on CBS2 56:22
New York Republican primary post-debate analysis 21:39

In case you missed it, watch CBS2's Republican gubernatorial primary debate and post-debate analysis.   

By CBS New York Team
 

Watch: Democratic primary debate

New York Democratic gubernatorial primary debate on CBS2 56:26
New York governor Democratic primary post-debate analysis 16:20

In case you missed it, watch CBS2's Democratic gubernatorial primary debate and post-debate analysis.   

By CBS New York Team
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