Larry Nassar victim calls his apology an attempt to "look less evil"

The former doctor for the USA Gymnastics team pleaded guilty to sexually molesting seven girls Wednesday. Larry Nassar said in court he hopes his victims can start the healing process.

CBS News correspondent Jericka Duncan spoke to one of his victims. Rachael Denhollander, who was referred to in court papers as "victim c."   

"He was charismatic, he was gregarious, he was charming. He was everything a pedophile typically is," Denhollander said. 

On Wednesday she watched as Nassar admitted to sexually assaulting her and six others who were all 15 or younger at the time.

"I pray the rosary every day for forgiveness for their – I want them to heal," Nassar said in court. 

Of his apology, Denhollander said, "I think it showed Larry's psychological state. He will take every opportunity to shift the attention back onto himself to try to make himself look less evil than he really is."

The judge admonished Nassar for molesting young athletes he was supposed to be treating for injuries.

"You violated the oath that you took which is to do no harm and you harmed them -- selfishly," Judge Rosemarie Aquilina said.

More than 130 women have now accused Nassar of abuse including star U.S. gymnasts Aly Raisman, McKayla Maroney, and Gabby Douglas, who came forward only on Tuesday. 

Three-time Olympic gold medalist Aly Raisman, who was not part of this case, tweeted Wednesday "Larry is a MONSTER, not a doctor."  Raisman spoke with "60 Minutes" earlier this month.

"When I see these young girls that come up to me, and they ask for pictures or autographs, whatever it is, I just – I can't – every time I look at them, every time I see them smiling, I just think – I just want to create change so that they never, ever have to go through this," Raisman said.

Nassar – who also pleaded guilty in a federal child porn case in July – now faces a minimum 25-year prison sentence for each of the seven counts of criminal sexual conduct. He will be sentenced in January.

According to Nassar's lawyers, the plea deal resolves all of his charged and uncharged conduct for more than 125 cases under investigation by the Michigan attorney general's office.