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Brooklyn subway shooting suspect Frank James arrested

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Investigators release more information on Brooklyn subway attack timeline 02:41

NEW YORK -- Frank James was arrested Wednesday afternoon in New York City.

The NYPD, the FBI and the ATF worked around the clock for 30 hours to bring James into custody.

As CBS2's Jessica Moore reports, police say James dropped clues along the way that helped investigators zero in on him as their prime suspect.

It was the worst mass shooting in the history of the subway system and now James will face terror-related charges.

Federal prosecutors say James, 62, crossed state lines from Pennsylvania to New York to carry out Tuesday's violent subway attack, bringing with him a bag full of weapons, including hatchets, pepper spray, gas canisters and a 9mm handgun. He now faces a federal terrorism charge, which includes carrying out violence onboard mass transit.  

"Frank James has been charged by complaint in Brooklyn Federal Court with one count of violating 18 USC sections 1992, A7 and B1, which prohibits terrorist and other violent attacks against mass transportation systems," said Breon Peace, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York. "The statue is titled 'Terrorism and Other Violent Attacks in Mass Transportation.'"

As CBS2's Dick Brennan reports, in the criminal complaint, prosecutors carefully laid out the timeline to the attack.

Surveillance cameras captured James allegedly driving a rented U-Haul van early Tuesday morning over the Verrazano Bridge and then parking it in Gravesend, Brooklyn, two blocks from the N train subway stop.

New surveillance video shows James walking toward the subway just before he carried out Tuesday's attack.

Police say he got on a Manhattan-bound N train at Kings Highway and rode eight stops before strapping on a gas mask, detonating smoke bombs and opening fire inside the packed train car and on the platform at 36th Street.

Fatim Gjeloshi says he was sitting across from the suspect when he started shooting.

"He was talking to himself the whole time," Gjeloshi said. "He was shooting, boom, boom. I was like, whoa, this guy's crazy."

Police say James shot ten people. None were killed, and all of the gunshot wounds were to the lower body, not the head or torso. Police believe that's because the smoke cannister affected the suspect's ability to see targets.

Police also say James vanished after the attack. Investigators later found the handgun he used and discarded after it jammed mid-rampage. It appeared someone tried to deface the serial number.

"We believe, but this is still early in the investigation, that after firing his weapon 33 times at innocent New York City subway riders, Mr. James boarded an R train that had pulled into the station, went one stop up and exited at 25th Street station," NYPD Chief of Detectives James Essig said.

At the 36th Street station, police recovered that bag of weapons, including fireworks and, most importantly, a key that led them to a nearby U-Haul van, which investigators say James had rented in Philadelphia.

"We were able to shrink his world quickly. There was nowhere left for him to run," Police commissioner Keechant Sewell said.

Police say James may have spent Tuesday night sleeping on the trains. There were sightings that had him in the Bronx at the end of the 4 line around midnight.

"My office and our law enforcement partners will use every tool at our disposal to bring this individual to justice," Peace said. 

Newly unearthed social media videos show an angry James warning he was "entering the danger zone" and ranting about city officials.

"Those who are gonna commit crimes, like the shooting, [expletive] got shot in the chest out in Brooklyn. The old lady got hit in the head with a hammer? You can't stop that. That means a policeman in every station and that's not possible," James says.

The videos raise the question of whether warning signals were missed, but former police commissioner Bill Bratton says authorities would have no reason to be looking at James' YouTube.

"There are tens of millions posting every day. Police cannot be proactively looking at that without some form of indication that there's a crime about to be committed or is being committed," Bratton said.

Sewell praised the NYPD, ATF and FBI for capturing James in just 30 hours.

"We hope this arrest brings some solace to the victims and the people of the city of New York," she said.

We also learned James has multiple prior arrests for crimes like criminal tampering, theft and criminal sex act.

James' first appearance in Brooklyn Federal Court will be Thursday. If he is convicted on this federal charge, he faces life in prison.

 

Brooklyn subway shooting suspect wasn't trying to hide when NYPD nabbed him East Village

The NYPD says it got its man.

Frank James might have made it really easy for police to find him.

Police sources tell CBS2's Alice Gainer that a call came in claiming to be the suspect, and police believe James was that caller.

For more on this story, click here.

By Alice Gainer
 

Hundreds of YouTube videos paint suspect Frank James as angry at many

Hundreds of YouTube videos paint suspect Frank James as angry at many 02:40

The suspect in the Brooklyn subway mass shooting often posted disturbing content on social media, including hundreds of hours of profanity-laced videos on YouTube.

Recent rants included criticism of Mayor Eric Adams and efforts to reduce homelessness and crime, CBS2's Tony Aiello reported Wednesday.

Frank James had a lot to say about the state of the world and he shared it almost daily online.

"They keep mentioning the potential of World War III. No, we're already in World War III," he says in one video.

Hundreds of video rants filled with foul-mouthed disdain for Black people, white people, Hispanic people, Asian people, celebrities, and politicians, including Adams and his policies on subway crime.

"You can do something about the homeless. He can do that, which is good, but those gonna commit crime, like the shooting. [Expletive] shot in the chest out in Brooklyn. Old lady got hit in the head with a hammer. You can't stop that. That means you have to have a policeman in every station, and that's not possible!" James said in one video.

It was a chilling foreshadowing of the subway attack three weeks later.

We know that James was born in 1959 and raised in the Bronx. His last known address here dates to 2003 -- a building on Ritter Place.

Not far away, one of his cousins told CBS2's Tony Aiello most family members had little contact with James.

"Something must have happened, maybe. I don't know," the cousin said.

"You're having a tough time believing this?" Aiello asked.

"Yes, yes. It's unbelievable," the cousin said.

James' sister also lives in the Bronx. She declined to speak with CBS2, but told the New York Times that James was a loner who moved often.

Until a few weeks ago he lived in a Milwaukee, Wisconsin, multi-family building. Neighbors described him as sullen and unfriendly.

"When I say 'Hi,' it's like a grunt. I don't see him. I hear him sometimes yelling on the phone, arguing about things. He's always chopping up something, and, yeah, he's not friendly. I hope he's not a bad guy," Keliah Miller said.

On his YouTube channel, James talked about attending a job training program in Long Island City and experiencing mental health issues. He described New York as "the source of all my troubles." The videos give the impression of a profoundly disturbed person.

Tonight, YouTube has disabled James' channel.

In recent weeks, James had been staying in a Philadelphia rental. The FBI searched that and a nearby storage unit and found evidence indicating James had access to a high-powered rifle, which has not been recovered.

By Tony Aiello
 

Artist leaves messages of hope outside Brooklyn subway station

Artist leaves messages of hope outside Brooklyn subway station 00:31

Messages of hope greet people outside the entrance of the 36th Street subway station in Brooklyn.

Street artist Caleb Honschar decorated the pavement with colorful messages written in sidewalk chalk.

He says he traveled from the Bronx to Brooklyn to bring light and peace after Tuesday's traumatic events.

By CBS New York Team
 

AP: James called Crime Stoppers on himself

Frank James called police to tell them where he was and to come get him, the Associated Press reported, citing law enforcement officials. 

During a news conference, police officials said they got a tip saying the suspect was in a McDonald's restaurant in the East Village - but they didn't specify who called the tip in. 

Two law enforcement officials told the Associated Press the tipster was James, and he asked police to come get him. 

When officers arrived, he wasn't there - but police spotted him nearby. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Frank James taken to federal custody

Frank James leaves the 9th precinct to be taken into federal custody. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Police credit dozens of tips for helping lead to arrest

Exclusive: CBS2 speaks to New Yorker who first spotted Brooklyn subway attack suspect's U-Haul van 02:18

Police say it is thanks to dozens of tipsters that they were able to track Frank James down, and it all began with one early crack in the case. 

CBS2's Natalie Duddridge spoke to a witness who first spotted the suspect's van. 

"I went upstairs put on the news they said they were looking for a white van," said Mitchell Rosen. 

Rosen said his alarm bells went off as he made the connection that as he made the connection that the vehicle blocking a driveway at his apartment building in the 300 block of Kings Highway was likely the van authorities were looking for. 

"A white U-Haul van with Arizona plates. So I immediately called 911 and told them it's downstairs," Rosen said. 

He said there was one question dispatchers asked him. 

"The only thing they wanted to know was is there anybody in the van. Tinted windows, hard to see... I don't believe there's anybody in the van. It's been there for hours," Rosen said.   

Within minutes, he cops descended on his neighborhood and evacuated his building. 

"Huge police presence here. Bomb squad here too. For hours - almost close to four hours - we were outside just waiting for them to let us back into the building," Rosen said. 

From there, police were able to track James' movements step by step. 

CBS2 obtained surveillance video that appears to show him walking down Kings Highway early Tuesday morning before the subway shooting. A man can be seen wearing a reflective vest wheeling a cart down the street and carrying a bag, looking identical to the man in the wanted poster police put out. Multiple angles capture him walking towards the Kings Highway station. 

Residents say they're relieved he's caught. 

"Today I didn't go to work because I was afraid he might come back," said Valerie Ocampo. "You never know what was his plan. Thank God police got him." 

Another neighbor who lives on Kings Highway says a white van was blocking his driveway three days ago, and wonders if it was the same vehicle. 

"Sunday afternoon, about 1:30 in the afternoon. It was parked for a couple hours, three-four hours. I got annoyed, put a note on  the windshield wiper 'Next time you block driveway I'm calling the cops,'" said George Denesopolis. 

He wonders if the suspect has ties to the neighborhood, and what he was doing there. Was he just getting a coffee, or did he have other connections. 

All U-Hauls are registered in Arizona, where the company is based. 

By Natalie Duddridge
 

Mayor Adams: "My fellow New Yorkers, we got him"

NYPD discusses the arrest of suspected Brooklyn subway shooter Frank James 23:43

"My fellow New Yorkers, we got him," Mayor Eric Adams said at a news conference announcing the arrest of suspect Frank James Wednesday afternoon. 

"Thirty three shots, but less than 30 hours later... we got him," Adams added. 

Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell said James was arrested on St. Mark's Place and First Avenue after police received a Crime Stoppers tip. 

"We were able to shrink his world quickly. There was no place left for him to run," Sewell said. 

NYPD officials said James had previously been arrested nine times in New York and three times in New Jersey. 

Officials say if convicted, James faces life in prison. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Hochul celebrates news of arrest

"Like all New Yorkers, I am deeply grateful that the suspect in yesterday's shooting has been apprehended. I am grateful to law enforcement and every first responder whose heroic efforts helped New York City respond to this horrific incident," Hochul wrote on Twitter. 

By CBS New York Team
 

BREAKING: Suspect Frank James is in custody

NYPD makes arrest in Brooklyn subway shooting 01:56

Brooklyn subway shooting Frank James was arrested Wednesday afternoon in New York City. 

James, 62, was arrested after being spotted walking around St. Mark's Place in the East Village. 

Video posted on Twitter shows the moment of his arrest. 

Video shows James, wearing a blue shirt and dark pants, being escorted into a police car. 

More details about his arrest are expected to be released at a news conference expected later Wednesday afternoon. 

Police say James attacked straphangers in the tunnel between 59th and 36th Street stations in Brooklyn, shooting 10 people and injuring 13 more. 

Detectives believe James entered the subway at the Kings Highway station. 

CBS2 obtained exclusive surveillance video that appears to show James walking down Kings Highway at 5:15 a.m. Tuesday, wheeling a cart down the street and carrying a bag. 

About three hours later, it was sheer terror for riders, who ran for their lives through the smoke and away from gunfire. 

Police say when the train stopped in the tunnel between 59th and 36th Street stations, a man in a gas mask unleashed smoke bombs and unloaded 33 shots. 

Fortunately, every single victim is expected to be OK, and many have already left the hospital. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Resident who called 911 after spotting U-Haul speaks out, exclusive video may show suspect

How Brooklyn resident's tip helped police ID subway shooting suspect 03:03

Even before the subway shooting, residents told CBS2 they noticed a white van illegally parked on the 300 block of Kings Highway.

They said it was on the edge of a bus stop, so they alerted their superintendent and called 311, thinking it was an abandoned vehicle. 

Little did they realize their tip would become a major crack in the case. 

"I went upstairs put on the news. They said they were looking for a white van, a white U-Haul van with Arizona plates. So I immediately called 911 and told them it's downstairs," said witness Mitchell Rosen. 

Rosen said his alarm bells went off and he made the connection that the vehicle blocking his building may be the van authorities were looking for. He said when he called police, there was just one question they asked him. 

"The only thing they wanted to know was is there anybody in the van. Tinted windows, hard to see... I don't believe there's anybody in the van. It's been there for hours," Rosen said. 

Within minutes, he cops descended on his neighborhood and evacuated his building. 

"Huge police presence here. Bomb squad here too. For hours - almost close to four hours - we were outside just waiting for them to let us back into the building," Rosen said. 

CBS2 also obtained exclusive video that appears to show suspect Frank James at 5:15 a.m. Tuesday morning walking down Kings Highway, just steps from the apartment building, wearing a reflective vest, wheeling a cart down the street and carrying a bag. The man in the video looks identical to the wanted posted police released. 

Residents wonder what was in the bags, and if he was on his way to allegedly carrying out the Brooklyn subway shooting at that moment. 

Another neighbor who lives in a house across the street says a white van was blocking his driveway three days ago, and wonders if it was the same vehicle. 

"Sunday afternoon, about 1:30 in the afternoon. It was parked for a couple hours, three-four hours. I got annoyed, put a note on  the windshield wiper 'Next time you block driveway I'm calling the cops,'" said George Denesopolis. 

He wonders if the suspect has ties to the neighborhood, and what he was doing there. Was he just getting a coffee, or did he have other connections. 

By Natalie Duddridge
 

Sunset Park students, parents still on edge

Some Brooklyn students headed back to class today after a difficult ordeal Tuesday.

P.S. 24 was one of the schools placed on lockdown, because it's only about a block away. 

Students return to school in Sunset Park 00:36

Parents and caregivers bringing children to school told CBS2 they were still worried about safety and the subway.

"It's scary, we feel scary," one woman said. "We took a taxi."

"At least we knew they were safe inside, and she's five, so she didn't know what's going on. She got to have her normal day," another woman added. 

O Tuesday, all New York City public schools within a one-mile radius of the attack were placed on lockdown for part of the school day. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Heightened security greets riders at 36th Street Station Wednesday

The 36th Street Station in Sunset Park, Brooklyn is back open following the horrific attack on Tuesday morning.

Many commuters say getting rid of the trauma will be difficult. CBS2's Elijah Westbrook has more on how riders felt on the subway heading to work Wednesday.

"I feel like everyone else, a little tense, but I've gotta get to work," one commuter said.

Subway riders "vigilant" after Brooklyn shooting 01:44

The morning rush at the Atlantic Avenue/Barclays Center station looked and perhaps felt different to some New Yorkers. Heightened security at one of the system's busiest stops was seen all over.

"Yeah, a little bit more in the train stations and the platforms, but then again they can't check everybody," a commuter said.

READ MOREBrooklyn subway shooting: Sources say cameras inside 36th Street station failed to transmit to NYPD, MTA

Officers carrying long guns nearly dominated the station's entranceway. Janno Lieber, chairman and CEO for the MTA, spoke about the increase on CBS Mornings on Wednesday.

"We know from surveying our riders. We surveyed 100,000 riders every month or so. Cops on platforms. Cops on trains. That is what makes people feel safe. The mayor has committed to do that. That transition has already been underway since before this incident," Lieber said.

But the amped-up presence wasn't enough to make Christopher Broughton feel at ease. Westbrook caught up with him as he headed to work.

"We need more of that every day, not just now because after this incident. Next week, they'll go back to the same routine," Broughton said. "I'm very nervous coming back from the COVID thing and everything and now with this incident, it even makes it worse."

The same sentiment was being felt with other riders. "Vigilant" is the word some used to describe how they'll conduct themselves in the days ahead.

"It just brings back 9/11 that day," subway rider Rick Eisman said. "Very anxious, but we move on. We're New Yorkers."

It's important note that although many expressed safety concerns taking the subway, others shrugging it off as just an everyday risk.

By Elijah Westbrook
 

Exclusive surveillance video may show suspect on the way to carrying out attack

How Brooklyn resident's tip helped police ID subway shooting suspect 03:03

CBS2 has obtained surveillance video that appears to show suspect Frank James on his way to allegedly carrying out the the Brooklyn subway shooting. 

for-bill-copy.jpg
Exclusive surveillance video shows a man matching the description of the suspect approaching the subway wearing a reflecting vest, pulling a luggage cart carrying a bag.  Image obtained by CBS2

The video shows a man, wearing a reflective vest, wheeling a piece of luggage down the street and carrying a bag. The man matches the description of the suspect police are looking for. 

Police suspect James opened fire on the subway, shooting 10 people. 

The NYPD has also just released new images of James - they want your help finding him. 

There's a $50,000 reward in the case. 

Anyone with any information about the attack is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.       

By CBS New York Team
 

More on the weapon used, manhunt for Frank James

frank-james.jpg
The NYPD released several new images of Brooklyn subway shooting suspect Frank James. NYPD

There's new information about the investigation into the Brooklyn subway shooting. 

The gun used, a 9mm Glock 17, had a serial number, and was sold at a pawn shop in Columbus, Ohio in 2011 by James, sources told CBS2. James did not have a license for the weapon in New York City. 

There's still no word on where the extended magazines used in the attack were purchased, though they can be bought online. 

James has no other registered weapons in his name. It's not clear if he's armed, although police are working on the assumption he is, sources told CBS2. 

By Jesse Zanger
 

Top NYPD brass take the subway

Commissioner Keechant Sewell posted video to Twitter of her morning ride on the A train with First Deputy Chief Edward Caban and Chief of Department Ken Corey on their way to graduation of NYPD cadets. 

By CBS New York Team
 

ADL condemns suspect's comments

Investigators are still looking into a possible motive, but say James is connected to some concerning social media posts.

The Anti-Defamation League tweeted a statement Wednesday, condemning his alleged hate speech.

"Although his hatred is not primarily directed at Jews, James has at times ranted about alleged Jewish power, and claimed that Jews contribute to the ills of society," the ADL tweeted. "Our team will continue to dig into his background and urge the public to contact @NYPDTips with any info."

By CBS New York Team
 

FBI: Submit your tips

The FBI has launched a dedicated website for tips from the shooting. 

They ask people to share images, videos and other information.

CLICK HERE to submit

By CBS New York Team
 

Several new images of suspect

The NYPD tweeted several new photos of Frank James, who is now considered a suspect in the case. 

Anyone with any information about the attack is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.     

By CBS New York Team
 

Frank James now considered suspect

Frank James is now considered a suspect in the investigation, Mayor Eric Adams says. 

James was initially described as a person of interest in the case. 

Police say the 62-year-old has multiple residences in Philadelphia and Wisconsin. 

He's believed to have rented a U-Haul that was found in Gravesend, Brooklyn and may be connected to the subway shooting. 

By CBS New York Team
 

"Why weren't the cameras working?"

MTA Chairman and CEO Janno Lieber appeared on CBS Mornings to answer one of the top questions on the minds of New Yorkers. 

"We have 600 cameras on this one line in Brooklyn, 2,500 cameras the length of the line. So the cops have been looking overnight at all of the stations -- where he got on, where he might have gotten off. It's an enormous range of video," Lieber said. "It's one of the things we've done to make the system safer. We went from 30% camera coverage of our 472 stations to 100% camera coverage. So we've got a lot of video for the cops to look at in that network."  

Gayle King pressed why the cameras were not working at these particular stations.

"I think in one location by the turnstile there was apparently a server problem, which they had been working on the day before," he replied. "But the bigger issue is there's so much video evidence from all of the stations on this line that there are images of this fellow that are going to be found."

What about adding more police to the subways?

"Since the prior mayoral administration, I've been asking, can we get the cops -- there are a lot of cops in the system, but -- on the trains and in the platforms, where New Yorkers feel vulnerable," said Lieber. "That is what makes people feel safe. The mayor has committed to do that. That transition has already been underway since before this incident."

Should New Yorkers feel safe taking the train?

"New Yorkers just keep bouncing back, and the subway is the fabric of New York. Nobody's going to give up our public space that defines New York, that makes New York possible -- that's what the subway is," he said. "The heroic MTA workers who powered those people out of the station to safety are also heroes. Good qualities of New York were on evidence yesterday."

By CBS New York Team
 

Adams: 4 remain hospitalized

Mayor Eric Adams says, by his last count, four people are still in the hospital this morning.

"I reached out yesterday in the hospital, there were only four remaining in the hospital. I'm going to speak with them this morning," the mayor told Good Morning America. "It was late once I finished, I didn't want to interrupt them, they were resting. But I will be communicating with the victims this morning."

Officials said a total of 23 people were hurt, including 10 that were shot. 

By CBS New York Team
 

MTA warned about cameras

As CBS News' Scott MacFarlane reports, state officials warned the MTA in a pair of inspections from 2018 and 2019 that transit station security cameras were at risk of malfunctioning.

CBS2's Political Reporter Marcia Kramer has more here.

By CBS New York Team
 

Subways and schools reopen Wednesday

Many subway riders may be feeling increased levels of anxiety Wednesday morning. 

There's heightened security at many train stations, including the Atlantic Barclays Center, a major transportation hub in Brooklyn. 

Sunset Parks schools, subways reopen after shooting 02:39

"To be honest, I'm a little anxious, and I didn't feel comfortable after what happened," subway rider Sam Warmington told CBS2 on Tuesday night. 

She was not alone. Many commuters said they were fearful of taking the train after the attack. 

"I'm afraid of going on the train, I am," one person said. 

Amped up security was in place at the station. CBS2's cameras captured bomb sniffing dogs head underground, along with extra police officers. 

"It's very shaking, because it's just so out of control now," rider Susan Rios said. 

Gov. Kathy Hochul took the subway with the MTA chair and CEO, and Mayor Eric Adams said he would take it too, if he wasn't in isolation. 

"Those poor people," said retired NYPD Transit Chief Joe Fox. 

Fox retired as the NYPD chief of transit in 2018. He told CBS2 the MTA planned to permanently lock doors between cars, because in the past, people have been injured moving about. 

"There wasn't a ton of moving, there's nowhere to go. It's horrifying," he said. 

Parents in the area also felt uneasy. Helicopters hovered above as students spent the day locked inside Sunset Park School.

Some parents waited more than an hour for news that the lockdown had ended.

"It was worth the wait, thank God," one father said. 

"I tried to call the school, but they don't pick up the phone, because they locked all the schools," said parent Nancy Gomes. "It's really, really hard. It's unbelievable."

Public schools will resume as normal at all schools across Brooklyn, even as the manhunt for the man responsible for the attack continues. 

The same goes for the subway system, although there are still delays and suspensions on the D, N, Q and R trains. 

By Elijah Westbrook
 

Crime Stoppers offer $50,000 reward

The NYPD Crime Stoppers are offering a $50,000 reward for information that leads to an arrest and indictment.

Anyone with any information about the attack is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.      

By CBS New York Team
 

Former NYPD first deputy police commissioner Ben Tucker talks about subway attack

Former NYPD first deputy police commissioner Ben Tucker talks about subway attack 01:16

CBS2's Maurice DuBois spoke with former NYPD first deputy police commissioner Ben Tucker about the chaos that unfolded Tuesday morning and the ongoing investigation.

DuBois asked what the city can do to recover from the traumatic events and how to reassure New Yorkers at a time like this.

"Well, there are things that you can do that are visible, right? I think the mayor mentioned it in his remarks, you put more visible presence, police officers, visible, so people feel if they see an officer, they feel more comfortable. You would hope that they do. Sometimes we can't really take the fear away, you know. They saw what they saw, as we did. It's real," Tucker said.

By Maurice DuBois
 

Good Samaritans help fellow New Yorkers escape Brooklyn subway attack

Good Samaritans help fellow New Yorkers escape Brooklyn subway attack 02:15

In an exclusive interview, Fatim Gjeloshi showed CBS2's Cory James his blood-stained shoe from Tuesday's violent subway shooting, but it's a bullet hole in his pants that reveals just how close he came to being a victim.

"The guy shoots me through the leg over here and over here on the left," he said.

The 20-year-old was filled with fear and says he started telling people to run to the back of the train engulfed with smoke. During that time, Gjeloshi says he used his leg to help people escape.

"I had to break the door open," he said. "I just went boom, boom, third time ... and it opens up ... Thank God we got lucky and the door opened on us. One minute later, the R train came."

On that train was a man named Ray.

"I haven't processed a damn thing. I'm exhausted," he said.

Ray says he quickly jumped in to help after seeing blood, smoke and panic.

"One of the first things I did was grab a man bleeding out on the floor just to get him out of foot traffic," he said.

Among the people in need was a young passenger who Ray says shared an immediate concern.

"She was like, 'Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm pregnant.' I said, 'What do you mean?' And she was like, 'I'm three months pregnant,'" Ray said. "As far as I can tell, none of the blood was hers, but she was covered in it. I think her leg was bothering her in some capacity."

The 28-year-old, who is a photographer, also took out his camera and captured images. Pictures that could be helpful in the investigation.

"A detective approached me because he saw the camera. He asked if I had anything good, and I said, yeah, hell yeah, let's do this thing, and he drove me back to the precinct and I was in the witness room ten minutes later at the 72nd," Ray said.

Two men who separately stepped up to help New Yorkers in need.

"Crazy experience," Gjeloshi said.

"I'm home. I hugged my mother and told her I love her and obviously I hope everybody that was there can do the same thing today," Ray said.

Both those Good Samaritans say they've been in contact with detectives, and neither is sure if they'll be taking the subway anytime soon.

By Cory James
 

Some New Yorkers anxious about taking the subway after attack in Brooklyn

Some New Yorkers anxious about taking the subway after attack in Brooklyn 03:02

Brooklyn's Barclays Center is home to a major transportation hub, and Tuesday night, there was extra security there.

Fans had to go through a layer of security set up at the outside plaza before being allowed inside the doors. Some people who spoke to CBS2's Lisa Rozner said they purposely avoided taking the trains to get there.

Specialized dogs sniffed any bag being brought to Tuesday night's Nets game.

Ticketholder Sam Warmington said she got there by bus instead of taking a direct train.

"To be honest, I'm a little anxious and I didn't feel comfortable after what happened this morning," she said.

She's not alone.

"I'm afraid of going on the train. I am," another person said.

At the N platform in the Atlantic Avenue-Barclays station, Susan Rios said she was five minutes behind the train where the attack occurred.

"I'm very shaken because it's just so out of control now," she said.

"I am feeling a little apprehensive right now, a little high alert, but I have to get home," Prospect Heights resident Kodi Haney said.

Bomb-sniffing dogs headed underground along with extra police.

A spokesperson for the mayor said double the amount of police would be in the subway system through Tuesday night, adding, "The NYPD will make the determination if folks need to stay on longer tomorrow as well."

Gov. Kathy Hochul took the subway with the MTA's chair and CEO, and Mayor Eric Adams said he too would take the subway if he wasn't in isolation after testing positive for COVID over the weekend.

"Those poor people today, there wasn't a ton of moving. There's nowhere to go. It's horrifying," retired NYPD chief of transit Joe Fox said.

He says the MTA planned to permanent lock doors between cars because in the past, people have been injured moving about.

Matt Johnson was in a train car one stop away from the incident.

"They went over the loudspeaker saying that there was a shooting at 36th," he said. "I heard the sirens. The reaction, it seemed very intense ... Then we left the station. The firefighters were like, all of you need to get out of here, and you could see the stress in their faces, so you knew it was something bigger."

Psychologist Rachel Goldman says whether you were there or not, it's OK to experience a variety of emotions. In fact, it's normal.

"Maybe you had hesitation about riding the subway anyways because of COVID and other things going on in the world, and now with this, to acknowledge that that's OK, that's a normal reaction," she said.

She reminds people to take it day by day in terms of deciding how comfortable you feel traveling on which mode of transportation.

By Lisa Rozner
 

Brooklyn subway shooting victim speaks out after horrific attack

10 people shot, 13 injured in subway attack in Brooklyn 02:52

Pictures and video show bloodied victims in the aftermath of Tuesday's shooting.

"It's the worst pain I ever felt in my life," survivor Hourari Benkada said.

Benkada says he was sitting next to the shooter.

"I didn't get a glimpse of his face, and all you see, like, was smoke, black smoke bomb going off and then, and then people bum-rushing to the back. This pregnant woman was in front of me, I was trying to help her. I didn't know that there were shots at first. I just thought it was a black smoke bomb. She said, 'I'm pregnant with a baby.' I hugged her, and then the bum-rush continued. I got pushed and that's when I got shot," he said.

Good Samaritans helped put pressure on wounds and stayed with the injured until help arrived.

Another gunshot victim who was taken to Maimonides Medical Center is 16.

"He had a gunshot wound to the hand. It was a pretty devastating injury to the thumb, and it destroyed a lot of the bone, the joint, the tendons, the nerves, but we were able to salvage the thumb. It's alive. He'll need some more surgery," said Dr. Jack Choueka.

Gov. Kathy Hochul met with that victim and his mother.

"Talk about her anxiety. All she has is her son and just the two of them," Hochul said.

She also met with another teenage patient.

"I had an opportunity to meet the 18-year-old patient, a young Latino man who is a student at the Borough of Manhattan Community College. He was on his way to school, and he was awaiting his surgery," she said. "He seems to be doing well. He was in very good spirits ... It was very important for me just to see the moms in their time of great stress. There's nothing more frightening for a mom or dad than to see your child injured."

Earlier Tuesday at NYU Langone Brooklyn, officers could be seen carrying what looked to be about half a dozen bags of evidence to a crime scene unit van. Around 20 people were treated there.

Several others were treated at New York Presbyterian Methodist.

By Tuesday night, many people had already been discharged, and no one was described as having life-threatening injuries.

By Alice Gainer
 

Brooklyn schools go into lockdown after subway attack

Brooklyn schools go into lockdown after subway attack 01:47

Schools within a mile of the scene remained on lockdown for the better part of the school day Tuesday.

CBS2's Jessi Mitchell was at P.S. 169 Sunset Park School alongside parents and guardians who were anxiously waiting to be reunited with their children. 

There was a crowd of hundreds outside the school when the bell rang. There were tears and hugs, but even more smiles.

Helicopters hovered overhead as students spent their day locked inside Sunset Park School.

One father waited more than an hour for news that the lockdown had ended. He picked up his older two children as soon as he could.

"It was worth the wait, thank God," he said.

An hour later at dismissal time, families were eager to see their little ones home safe. The Sandoval-Gomes family welcomed young Stephanie with a sweet treat.

"I tried to call the school, but they don't pick up the phone because they locked all the schools and it's really, really hard. It's unbelievable," Nancy Gomes said.

"How do you feel now you have your baby girl?" Mitchell asked.

"I feel so happy. That's why we came as a family to pick her up because we were so scared for her, like if she's feeling OK but thank God, she's good," Gomes said.

Closer to the mass shooting scene, families of students at P.S. 24 tried to stay calm while waiting for answers.

"I don't even know if they did the lockdown or not, but I think that it's horrible. Even now, I can't even go to work. I'm using the train every day. My whole family uses the train every day," one man said.

"They need more security and everything more in the subways for the people because you never know," another man said.

Classes will resume as normal Wednesday at all the public schools in the borough, even as the manhunt for the man responsible for this attack continues. 

By Jessi Mitchell
 

More information released about man wanted in Brooklyn subway shooting

More information released about man wanted in Brooklyn subway shooting 01:53

We've learned more information about the man police are looking for in connection to the Brooklyn subway shooting and smoke bomb attack, but they still haven't tracked him down.

By Elise Preston
 

Doctor offers update on young shooting victims

Gov. Hochul visits Brooklyn subway attack victims at Maimonides Medical Center 01:30

Of the 23 injured, a handful were brought to Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn. The governor was also there visiting victims.

Gov. Kathy Hochul says five people were brought there, ranging in age from 12-18, because it's the only pediatric trauma center in the borough.

As CBS2's Alice Gainer reports, we're told three victims took themselves to the hospital to be treated for smoke inhalation and have since been released. Two gunshot victims remain.

"One of them has been in the operating room and is out and is stable, and the other one we're watching very closely, but they'll be with us for a few days," said Dr. John P. Marshall, chair of the department of emergency medicine. "Both victims were able to speak. I think it was a very confusing situation."

"I had an opportunity to meet the 18-year-old patient, a young Latino man who is a student at the Borough of Manhattan Community College. He was on his way to school, and he was awaiting his surgery," Hochul said. "He seems to be doing well. He was in very good spirits."

The governor may also be going to visit other victims who were taken to NYU Langone Brooklyn and New York Presbyterian Methodist Hospital, although the good news is we're told many victims have already been released.

By Alice Gainer
 

Police track down U-Haul believed to be linked to Brooklyn subway shooting

Police track down U-Haul believed to be linked to Brooklyn subway shooting 01:44

Police tracked down a U-Haul believed to be linked to the shooting after finding the keys to the vehicle at the scene of the incident.

As helicopters circled above, police cautioned off the area on West First and Kings Highway.

Jackie Franco couldn't get to his apartment. He was concerned because his wife and son were both inside, and his phone died so he was unable to reach them.

"I'm afraid maybe he's snuck into the building. Who knows? It's scary," he told CBS2's Leah Mishkin. "It's crazy, really crazy."

Police investigate U-Haul believed to be connected to Brooklyn subway shooting 00:50

Marysol Santiago also lives near the scene of where the U-Haul was discovered and had those same fears, not knowing what was inside that vehicle. Her dogs were inside her apartment.

"Where the car is parked, the van, it's actually across the street from where I live," she said.

Police weren't letting people past a certain point while they cleared the scene, so Santiago waited at her local pizzeria. They've been in business for 22 years and an employee said they've never seen anything like this before.

"It's sad, it's sad, it's sad," he said.

We're told the van was checked out and cleared by the bomb squad.

CBS2's Leah Mishkin contributed to this report.

By CBS New York Team
 

Gov. Kathy Hochul visits victims at Maimonides Medical Center

Gov. Kathy Hochul visits Brooklyn subway shooting, smoke bomb attack victims 08:14

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Tuesday visited victims of the subway shooting and smoke bomb attack at Maimonides Medical Center.

Hochul said five victims, four children and one 18-year-old, were treated there. The youngest victim is 12 years old, and another victim is 16. The governor also said all five victims were on their way to school when the attack happened.

By CBS New York Team
 

WATCH: Officials provide update on Brooklyn subway shooting, smoke bomb attack

Officials provide update on Brooklyn subway shooting, smoke bomb attack 22:28

Officials provided an update Tuesday evening on the subway shooting and smoke bomb attack in Brooklyn.

According to NYPD Chief of Detectives James Essig, 10 people -- seven males and three females -- were shot and 13 people suffered injuries related to smoke inhalation, falling down or a panic attack.

As the N train was between the 59th Street and 36th Street stations, witnesses say a dark-skinned, heavy-set male seated in the rear corner of the second car opened up two smoke grenades, tossed them on the subway floor, brandished a Glock 9mm handgun, then fired at least 33 times, striking 10 people.

The suspect was wearing a orange-green nylon-type construction vest, gray hoodie, surgical mask and neon green construction helmet.

After the train arrived at the 36th Street station, he fled the scene.

Police recovered at the scene a Glock 17 9mm handgun and three extended Glock-type magazines. One was still in the weapon, one was under a seat and one was in a backpack.

Police also found 33 discharged shell casings, 15 bullets, five bullet fragments, two detonated smoke grenades, two non-detonated smoke grenades, a hatchet, black garbage can, black rolling cart, gasoline and a U-Haul key.

The U-Haul key led to the recovery of a U-Haul van in Brooklyn. Police say the van was rented in Philadelphia by 62-year-old Frank R. James, who has addresses in Wisconsin and Philadelphia.

By CBS New York Team
 

Officials say Frank James of Philadelphia is renter of U-Haul van, "person of interest" they want to speak to

Authorities released new information in the search for a suspect in the Brooklyn subway shooting. 

Police released an image of a person of interest in the case - Frank R. James, 62, saying they know James rented the U-Haul van they had been searching for. 

The U-Haul van was discovered on Kings Highway, where police believe the gunman entered the subway system. 

It's not clear if James was in the subway or if he had any other connection to the shooting, police said. They said he was the renter of the van. 

This evening, police said he gunman - described as a heavyset Black male - was seated in back of the second car of the train. As the train approached 36th Street station, the suspect opened two smoke canisters, pulled out a gun, and fired 33 shots. 

NYPD Commissioner Keechant Sewell said 10 people were shot and another 13 were injured in the attack. 

A Glock 17 was recovered at the scene, with three magazines. Two smoke grenades - undetonated - and a hatchet, along with the gasoline were recovered at the scene. 

Police believe the gun jammed, preventing further injuries. 

Police say they found gasoline, fireworks, and a hobby fuse at the scene - along with the key to a U-Haul van. 

Sewell said some "concerning posts" on social media related to homelessness and Mayor Eric Adams - which may have been made my James - are prompting them to increase security around Adams temporarily. 

Police announced a $50,000 reward in the case.   

Anyone with any information is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.  

By CBS New York Team
 

Police release photo of person of interest in Brooklyn subway shooting

Police say they are looking for Frank James in connection to Tuesday's Brooklyn subway shooting. They have released the above photo of the person of interest. Anyone who sees James or has information on his whereabouts is asked to call 1-800-577-TIPS.

By CBS New York Team
 

Gov. Kathy Hochul takes subway after the attack

Governor Kathy Hochul rode the subways after Tuesday's attack. 

Her communications director Tweeted a photo of the governor on the train. 

"New Yorkers keep going," Julie Wood wrote. 

By CBS New York Team
 

NYPD locates U-Haul van sought in connection to Brooklyn subway shooting

NYPD locates U-Haul van sought in connection to Brooklyn subway shooting 01:05

Police have located the U-Haul van believed to be connected to the Brooklyn subway shooting suspect.

The van was found on Kings Highway between West Fourth and West Third streets around 4 p.m. As CBS2's Dan Rice reports, police cleared about three or four blocks around the area and had a bomb squad unit on the scene to make sure everything around the van is secure. The fire department was also on the scene.

By CBS New York Team
 

Brooklyn Nets react to subway attack ahead of play-in game

Brooklyn Nets react to subway attack ahead of play-in game 02:18

The Brooklyn Nets' practice facility is located in Sunset Park, and the players learned of Tuesday's incident as they were preparing for their game.

As CBS2's Otis Livingston reports, obviously, the tragic situation is in the hearts of the Nets, who are preparing for their play-in game against the Cleveland Cavaliers. It's not exactly where the Nets thought they would be when this season started, but this is the path they'll have to take if they want to win a title many predicted back in October they would win.

While the Nets were inside their practice facility preparing for the big game, they were well aware of the situation going on outside.

"It's devastating," Kevin Durant said. "To hear the sirens out front the practice facility, to see so much commotion going on outside, you hope and pray for the best for everybody involved ... I hate violence. I hate senseless violence."

"It's kind of scary how close it was. I already been in the subway a couple of times, but now I have my doubts," Nets guard Goran Dragic said.

"We're devastated for the community and those directly involved," head coach Steve Nash said. "We're just all concerned about everyone involved, and at the same time, try to prepare and be focused on our task at hand the best we can."

The game obviously takes a back seat to what happened Tuesday morning, but it's still very big in the realm of sports.

Just to be clear, this is not a playoff game. This is part of the NBA's play-in tournament to earn a place in the playoffs.

If the Nets beat the Cavs, they're in as the seventh seed.

If they lose, they're still alive and can earn the eighth seed later this week, but they obviously want to lock it up and get some rest before the playoffs start this weekend.

"I think we're all just motivated to just get up and be in this position. Lot of teams have gone home and are enjoying their summers right now, so I think our motivation just comes from just still being in the fight and giving ourselves an opportunity. We're just focused on today," Durant said.

The Nets released a statement saying, "Our thoughts are with those who have been impacted by the tragic event ... in Brooklyn this morning."

They went on to say they are working closely with law enforcement partners and fans should expect increased security at Barclays Center.

By Otis Livingston
 

Schools Chancellor met with principals in Brooklyn

"Today I met with principals in Sunset Park impacted by today's tragedy. I saw inspiring leadership & supportive communities proving that we are strongest when we support one another," Schools Chancellor David Banks wrote on Twitter. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Mayor Adams: "We all must remain vigilant"

Mayor Eric Adams updates CBS2 on the Brooklyn subway shooting, smoke bomb attack 03:20

Mayor Eric Adams was asked about cameras being down at the subway station where the attack took place. 

"The system is under control of the MTA, and they are cooperating with City Hall and the NYPD to determine if there was any video captured," Adams said. "We are going to examine the other stations, because the camera system is an important part of our anti-violence and terrorist operation as well." 

Mayor Eric Adams decried the attack as a "sick act of violence on innocent New Yorkers" and said people must remain vigilant. 

He also said the NYPD is going to double its enforcement and uniformed personnel into the subway system in the aftermath of this shooting. 

Adams said he's looking into technology that enables surveillance equipment to detect firearms. 

"We're going to make sure we do everything within legal means, and we're also going to protect New Yorkers," Adams said. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Sources: Only 3 of more than 10,000 MTA cameras were not transmitting Tuesday

Sources told CBS2's Marcia Kramer on Tuesday afternoon the cameras, themselves, inside the 36th Street station were working. It was the connection that sends the camera feed to both the NYPD and MTA security centers that was apparently on the fritz.

And here's another possible coincidence. Sources told CBS2 that the cameras at the two subway stops on either side of the 36th Street station -- 45th Street and 25th Street -- also had the same connectivity problem.

The MTA has approximately 10,000 cameras at its 472 subway stations. All were operational except at those three stations, sources said.

To read Kramer's full report, please click here.

By Marcia Kramer
 

U-Haul van police had been searching for located in Brooklyn

Chopper 2 Flying

Chopper 2 is over the scene of a shooting incident at a Brooklyn subway station. See complete local coverage on CBS News New York: http://cbsloc.al/cbsnewsnewyork

Posted by CBS New York on Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Police have located the U-Haul van they were searching for. It was located in Gravesend, Brooklyn, at Kings Highway near West 4th street. 

Sources tell CBS2 that a document found on the scene led police to search for the U-Haul van. 

By CBS New York Team
 

U-Haul speaks out about investigation

uhaul-bolo.jpg
A stock image of the kind of U-Haul van the NYPD is searching for in connection with the subway mass shooting.  NYPD

"Law enforcement has alerted us to its search for a rental van and its possible connection to a suspect in today's incident in New York City. We are working closely with authorities to ensure they have any and all available information to meet their needs," said Sebastien Reyes of U-Haul. 

Earlier, CBS2 reported that police were searching for a U-Haul van with Arizona plates #AL31408 they suspect may be connected to the subway shooting suspect. 

Anyone with any information is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.     

By CBS New York Team
 

Over 2 dozen victims treated at area hospitals

29 patients treated at 3 area hospitals after Brooklyn subway shooting, smoke bomb attack 02:04

More than two dozen victims from Tuesday's attack are being treated at three area hospitals.

Twenty three patients were treated at various hospitals.

Most of the victims were treated at NYU Langone -- Brooklyn. The patient count there hospital at last check was 21.

Tuesday afternoon, officers were seen walking out of the hospital carrying what appeared to be a half dozen bags of evidence that was taken to a crime scene unit van.

Another five were taken to Maimonides Medical Center, and three others were transported to New York Presbyterian.

The injuries ranged from gunshot wounds to smoke inhalation and fractured bones from trampling.

Not everyone was transported by ambulance. Some arrived at the hospitals on their own.

As CBS2's Aundrea Cline-Thomas reports, what's probably the most amazing thing is that no one, so far, is described as sustaining life-threatening injuries.

Sources say the victims range in age from being teenagers to people who are middle age.

Already 12 people have already been released.

Good Samaritans provided initial care on the train to fellow riders, springing into action to put pressure on wounds and stay with those who were injured until help arrived minutes later.

In addition to the physical toll, the mental and emotional toll is far more widespread. After the shock and horror of what so many riders experienced and witnessed, many will need even more time to process.

By Aundrea Cline-Thomas
 

President Biden: "We're not letting up until... we find this perpetrator"

President Joe Biden spoke out about the shooting Tuesday afternoon. 

"My wife Jill and I are praying for those that are injured and all those touched by that trauma, and we're grateful for all the first responders that jumped into action, including civilians - civilians who didn't hesitate to help their fellow passengers and try to shield them. My team has been in touch with Mayor Adams and New York's police commissioner, and the Department of Justice and the FBI are working closely with the NYPD on the ground. 

"We're going to continue to stay in close contact with New York authorities as we learn more about the situation over the coming hours and days... We're not letting up on it until we find out, and we find this perpetrator." 

By CBS New York Team
 

A look at what might be the shooter's additional equipment

backpack-01.jpg
An image of a bag filled with fireworks, a hatchet and more which police suspect may have been part of the Brooklyn subway shooter's gear.  Image via CBS News

CBS News got ahold of a picture showing the contents of a bag recovered at the scene of the Brooklyn subway shooting. Sources told CBS2 it contains additional smoke bombs, fireworks, and a hatchet. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Witnesses describe frightening scene at 36th Street station

Throughout Tuesday morning, CBS2's Leah Mishkin spoke to people who were by the 36th Street station as the scene was unfolding.

What stuck out to her was many in the crowd staying to help, including residents, workers and parents.

"I live right on 36th Street, so it was about 8:40 a.m. in the morning. I started hearing it more and more, ambulances, fire trucks," one person said.

Witnesses describe chaos after Brooklyn subway shooting 02:38

When this Sunset Park resident went downstairs, he told Mishkin he saw people getting out of the 36th Street subway station.

"Some people were covered with blood on their hands. They had their masks still in their hands, scrapes on their faces. And then I noticed more and more and more police and ambulances," he said.

He got water bottles and stayed nearby to hand them out.

A woman was on the R train when it came to a stop. Everyone was told to evacuate. She says as she made her way up the 36th Street station stairs, she started to smell smoke.

"Coming up the stairs, I saw maybe a 16-year-old that was shot in the knee. You could clearly see the bullet in his knee," she said.

She says as she stood outside on the corner, she saw two more wounded people, adding she felt fortunate her 10-year-old brother, who she brought to school Tuesday morning, wasn't with her at that time.

"But it was a pretty scary moment because there were a lot of kids and everybody is going to work and school," she said.

Schools within a one-mile radius of 36th Street and 4th Avenue were told to shelter in place as police searched for a suspect.

Joanna Morales' 10-year-old was inside Public School 24.

"I'm okay because I spoke to police," Morales said.

She told CBS2 she felt reassured her daughter was safe inside.

Others who saw the scene unfold were shaken as they described to Mishkin what they had witnessed. One man, who was having breakfast by the subway, said he saw smoke and rushed out of the area.

"Something that seems premeditated and organized and they haven't caught the guy. That's the disturbing part to me," he said.

By CBS New York Team
 

Shooting causes major issues for subway riders across the system

Brooklyn subway shooting, smoke bomb attack causes major problems for commuters 02:24

This morning's shooting resulted in major issues for subway riders. 

As CBS2's Jenna Deangelis reports, yellow tape stopped commuters from entering Grand Street station throughout the day. 

"I always take the B or the D, now I got to go, walk three blocks, catch the F train," said Brooklyn resident Henry Mason. 

Train service was suspended due to the shooting in Brooklyn, leaving people scrambling. 

"Big problem, 'cause now everyone's gonna be late for work, including myself," said Chinatown resident Brandon Ching. 

When Ching arrived to the station after 10 a.m., he saw NYPD officers notifying other commuters of the issues. 

"He told her in Cantonese that there's no more train service, temporarily right now," Ching said. 

Shortly after, cops began clearing out the station, taping the turnstile. An MTA employee worked to notify confused commuters, and in the meantime giving riders courtesy passes to take trains elsewhere. 

"I waited for train B, tried to go to Chinatown, think I need to walk because I'm waiting for like 20 minutes already and I'm tired," said tourist Jairo Villavaso. 

In an afternoon press briefing, the MTA said B and W trains were suspended, D, N and R running with delays. 

Despite disruptions, the system was running. The head of the MTA commended its workers and commuters who were at the scene of the shooting and jumped in. 

"We saw New Yorkers in a difficult situation and emergency helping each other. That's the subway riders. That's who New Yorkers are," MTA CEO and Chairman Janno Lieber said. 

It's not yet clear when the station will reopen, or when service will resume as normal. 

The MTA suggests checking its website or app to monitor delays. To do so, CLICK HERE.  

By Jenna DeAngelis
 

Brooklyn Nets say game will go on, expect increased security

The Brooklyn Nets said tonight's game will go forward, and asks fans to arrive early and "expect an increased security presence at Barclays Center." 

"Our thoughts are with those who have been impacted by the tragic event at the 36th St. subway station in Brooklyn this morning. Thank you to all who answered the call," the Nets wrote on Twitter. 

By CBS New York Team
 

NYPD Commissioner: We need your help, New York

NYPD Commissioner Keechant Sewell is asking for the public's help finding the suspect. 

He's described as Black, approximately 5'5", wearing a green construction vest and gray hooded sweatshirt. 

Additionally, police sources tell CBS2 the NYPD is searching for a U-Haul van with Arizona plates #AL31408 in connection with the shooting. 

Anyone with any information is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.        

By CBS New York Team
 

NYPD sources: Gun believed to have been used in the attack jammed, backpack with other equipment recovered

Sources tell CBS2 that the 9mm pistol found on the subway, which is believed to have been dropped or discarded by the gunman, jammed. 

The pistol still had bullets in its magazine. 

Police believe the gunman ditched the weapon once it jammed. 

A bag with fireworks, additional smoke grenades and a hatchet were also recovered at the scene.

By CBS New York Team
 

N.Y. Attorney General Letitia James: "This attack... will simply not be tolerated"

New York Attorney General Letitia James released a statement regarding the attack. Note the FDNY now says it transported 17 people to hospitals. 

"In the face of great challenge, New Yorkers always rise to help each other. Today was no different; New Yorkers responded with courage and compassion. This attack that injured 16 innocent New Yorkers and impacted countless more will simply not be tolerated. My office is monitoring the situation and we remain in contact with the NYPD and our other partners in law enforcement. Our entire city is grateful to the transit workers, first responders, and everyday New Yorkers who acted quickly to help those in need.

"I urge anyone with information to please contact the NYPD at 1-800-577-TIPS."

By CBS New York Team
 

Police source: NYPD searching for U-Haul van

uhaul-bolo.jpg
A stock image of the kind of U-Haul van the NYPD is searching for in connection with the subway mass shooting.  NYPD

Police sources tell CBS2 the NYPD is searching for a U-Haul van with Arizona plates #AL31408 in connection with the shooting. 

There's still no word on the suspect's motive. 

Sources tell CBS2 police are combing through multiple images, including cell phone video and street cameras, and feeding them through facial recognition.

Police are still not clear if the gunman fled on foot, exiting from the station or the subway tunnels. 

Anyone with any information is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.      

By CBS New York Team
 

PHOTOS: Multiple injured in shooting, smoke bomb attack

By CBS New York Team
 

Amtrak stepping up police presence

The agency says it is increasing patrols around trains and stations, including Penn Station and Moynihan Train Hall. 

"Amtrak is saddened to hear about the incident in Brooklyn this morning and our hearts go out to the MTA customers and employees and their families. Amtrak has increased its police presence on our trains and stations, including New York Penn Station and Moynihan Train Hall, and the Amtrak Police Department will continue to work with our law enforcement and emergency management partners at local, state, federal and private sector level to help in their investigations," the statement read in part.

By CBS New York Team
 

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand sends her prayers

The senator released the following statement: 

"I am closely monitoring developments regarding the shooting in the subway in Brooklyn. My prayers are with the victims and their loved ones, as well as the emergency personnel and law enforcement responding to this this situation. I am incredibly grateful to the courageous New Yorkers who came to the aid of their fellow passengers and to the MTA train operators whose quick thinking saved lives—their bravery and fortitude represents the best of our state. As our law enforcement officials continue to search for the suspect, I urge New Yorkers with any information to come forward to help bring this individual to justice."

By CBS New York Team
 

Area schools to be dismissed at 2:40 p.m.

City Councilmember Alexa Aviles tweeted that schools that have been in shelter-in-place due to the subway mass shooting will take place as scheduled at 2:40 p.m. Parents are advised to avoid 4th Avenue when they go to collect their children. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Dramatic video captures person banging on subway car door

Dramatic video posted on Twitter shows a person attempting to enter a car next to the one where the shooting took place but not being able to get through the door. The person can be heard banging on the window to the car while trying to enter. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Patient count keeps climbing

More than a dozen people have been treated at local hospitals. 

Officials say at least 16 people were injured. Ten were shot, and five are in critical but stable condition. 

Others were treated for smoke inhalation and trample injuries.

Latest patient count stands at 28 in subway mass shooting 03:56

NYU Langone Brooklyn says it has seen 20 people -- some with physical injuries and others with anxiety.

Five others were treated at Maimonides Medical Center, along with three others at New York Presbyterian Brooklyn. 

By Aundrea Cline-Thomas
 

5 things we know about the Brooklyn subway shooting

Get the latest on the investigation here.

By CBS New York Team
 

NYPD: Cameras not operational in several key subway stations

The NYPD says surveillance cameras at the token booth and platform are not operational at the 36th Street, 45th Street and 24th Street stations. 

Police say it is an MTA issue.

Security expert on subway shooting investigation 16:46

A police camera on 36th Street was working, but it is not clear where the suspect entered - or exited - the system. 

Sources tell CBS2 that although the cameras, including the live feed, was not operational, authorities have asked the MTA to open the cameras for the memory, to see if the memory recorded and can be retrieved.

By CBS New York Team
 

Police: Handgun, smoke canister recovered from the scene

Police have recovered a handgun and a smoke canister from the scene. 

The pistol, described as "Glock-like," had bullets left in it. 

Security expert on Brooklyn shooting investigation 09:13

It's not yet clear how many shots were fired, and if there was more than one gun used.   

No explosive devices have been recovered. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Public Advocate Williams: "Think about the mental trauma"

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams spoke about the shooting during another event.

Public advocate speaks out about subway shooting 00:41

"All of our hearts are with the folks who were shot, the folks who were injured, and the folks who were on that train," he said. "You've got to think about the mental trauma that people are going through."

By CBS New York Team
 

Witnesses describe smoke, people running from station

CBS2's Leah Mishkin spoke with several witnesses on the scene in Sunset Park. 

Many described the injuries they saw and the panic that ensued.

"I see people running in and out of the subway, going this way or that way... I just stood back," one Sanitation worker said. "When I saw the bomb squads and the helicopters, I knew it had to be serious."  

Witness saw people running from subway, "not looking back" 02:32

Another witness had just dropped her 10-year-old brother off at school when she was caught in the chaos.

"Coming up the stairs, I saw and I smelled a lot of smoke. And coming up the stairs I saw maybe a 16-year-old that was shot in the knee. You can clearly see the bullet in his knee," she said. "I saw two more victims that were injured. They were wounded on their knee and on their thighs."

Others who live in the neighborhood said they were shaken that something like this could happen so close to home.

"I started seeing some of the people come up from the subway stop over there, which is my stop, and they were coming out, and some people were covered in blood on their hands, their masks still in their hands, and scrapes on their faces," one man said. "Then I noticed more and more police presence, and ambulances and fire trucks."

"Nobody was looking around to see what was going on, just moving away, not looking back," another man added.

By CBS New York Team
 

Bishop Robert Brennan on Brooklyn subway shooting

"On this Tuesday of Holy Week, our city has suffered a terrible attack on New Yorkers just trying to commute. Let us fervently pray for the multiple people shot and injured in a Sunset Park subway station. Lord, help the healing hands take care of the victims and protect the law enforcement officers trying to locate the suspect in this shooting. We are grateful for their courage and service to protect us. And please, Lord, keep us all safe in your embrace." - Bishop of Brooklyn Robert Brennan

By CBS New York Team
 

Mayor Adams: "We will not allow New Yorkers to be terrorized"

Mayor Adams thanks New Yorkers for jumping into action 01:52

Mayor Eric Adams, who is self-isolating after testing positive for COVID, released a statement on Twitter about the shooting. 

Adams said he's been in "constant communication" with NYPD, FDNY, EMS and more. 

"First, let me say, we're praying for all New Yorkers who were injured or affected by this attack," Adams said. 

"We will not allow New Yorkers to be terrorized, even by a single individual. NYPD is searching for the suspect at large, and we will find him. But we ask the public to come forward with any information that may help us in this investigation," Adams added. 

Anyone with any information is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.    

By CBS New York Team
 

Officials give update on shooting

Officials share update on Brooklyn subway shooting 11:17

Officials gave a briefing Tuesday afternoon on the subway shooting, revealing new details on what happened and when. 

Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell said the incident started just before before 8:24 a.m. as the Manhattan-bound train was approaching the 36th Street station. They say a passenger on the train put on a gas mask, took out a canister, and then the car filled with smoke. 

That's when the gunman opened fire. 

The shooter is described as a Black man, 5'5" wearing a green construction-type vest and a grey sweatshirt. 

There were 16 injuries, including 10 with gunshot wounds. Five of the injured are in critical but stable condition. 

"This individual is still on the loose," Gov. Kathy Hochul said. "This is an active shooter situation." 

Officials say no explosive devices have been found in the subway system. 

B and W service remains suspended, and other lines were also experiencing disruptions.   

"We say no more. We say no more mass shootings," Hochul said. "It has to end, and end now." 

Authorities say they'll be giving another briefing later Tuesday. 

Anyone with any information is asked to call the NYPD's Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477), or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). You can also submit a tip via their website or via DM on Twitter, @NYPDTips. All calls are kept confidential.  

By CBS New York Team
 

Commuters deal with confusion, long delays

Tuesday's shooting in Brooklyn resulted in major issues for the morning commute.

CBS2's Jenna DeAngelis spoke to some people trying to get to work in Chinatown and has more on what the current situation is in the subway system.

Subway shooting causes mass confusion Tuesday morning 01:41

The Grand Street station is taped off, meaning nobody can get in. An MTA worker told CBS2 that trains may slowly trickle in, but the agency doesn't want any commuters in the area of the shooting waiting because there are major delays.

Cops could be seen clearing out the station and an MTA employee worked to notify confused commuters.

"They don't say nothing. I don't know what happened," one commuter said.

Train service at Grand Street was suspended due to the shooting, leaving people scrambling.

"Big problem because now everyone's gonna be late for work, including myself," Chinatown resident Brandon Ching said.

When Ching arrived to the station he saw cops taping it off and notifying other commuters of the issues.

"He told her in Cantonese that there's no more train service, temporarily, right now," Ching said.

In the meantime, the MTA was handing out courtesy passes so people could try trains elsewhere.

By CBS New York Team
 

Schools Chancellor David Banks on nearby schools

"Following the incident this morning in Sunset Park, out of an abundance of caution and for the safety of our students we have placed all schools in the area in a shelter-in-place. We are working closely with NYPD and school leadership to ensure that every school has the supports they need as we work to ensure the safety of our school communities. We will share updates as they become available. My thoughts go out to the victims of this tragedy."  - Schools Chancellor David Banks.     

By CBS New York Team
 

Sen. Charles Schumer: "To everyone in New York: Stay safe"

"I'm closely monitoring the situation this morning at the 36th Street station in Sunset Park in our beloved Brooklyn. I'm praying for all the victims, their families, all those impacted. I'm grateful for the quick action of our first responders. To everyone in New York: Stay safe," Sen. Charles Schumer wrote on Twitter. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Sunset Park neighborhood shaken

CBS2's Leah Mishkin spoke with a man who lives in the neighborhood and came to see if he could help.

"We live right there, so I had some water bottles and things like that if people needed," he said.

Sunset Park neighborhood shaken after subway shooting 02:32

He described the injuries and chaos that ensued, and said he's shaken up.

"A little nervous now. I already had a bad feeling. So I think this is probably going to make it a little nerve-wracking getting on every day," he said.

By CBS New York Team
 

New Jersey State Police activates Regional Operations and Intelligence Center

New Jersey State Police say they're using the New Jersey Regional Operations and Intelligence Center and are "in constant communication with law enforcement partners with the state and throughout the region." 

By CBS New York Team
 

Connecticut State Police monitoring train stations there

Connecticut State Police say they're monitoring the situation in Brooklyn, and while no threat has been identified in Connecticut, patrols are being sent to train stations. 

By CBS New York Team
 

School shelter in place extends 1 mile around incident

Manhattan Borough President Mark Levine says the Department of Education's shelter in place order extends for all schools within a one mile radius of 36th Street and 4th Avenue in Brooklyn. 

"This means students may not leave their buildings, and there is enhanced screening for adults entering. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Security expert: Too soon to say if terror related

Security expert: Too soon to say if terror related 05:25

Nelson Vergara, a retired U.S. Marine and law enforcement professor, tells CBS2 about the next steps in the investigation and search for suspect.

By CBS New York Team
 

Transit Workers Union blasts "egregious act of senseless violence"

In a statement posted on Twitter, the Transport Workers Union wrote: 

"Today, in an egregious act of senseless violence, a coward opened fire on New York City subway riders during rush hour, injuring at least a dozen and traumatizing many more. Out hearts go out to the riders who were victimized in today's shooting." 

By CBS New York Team
 

Major subway disruptions continue amid hunt for suspect

Subway disruptions continue after Tuesday morning's shooting in the subway in Brooklyn. 

By CBS New York Team
 

"You can clearly see the bullet in his knee"

CBS2's Leah Mishkin hears from a witness who was dropping her brother off at school when she got caught in the commotion. 

Witness describes seeing subway shooting victim 01:40

She said she saw what appeared to be a teenager with a gunshot wound.  

By CBS New York Team
 

Information for concerned families, loved ones

New York City has activated its Unified Victim Identification System. 

If you're concerned about someone who might've been involved in the incident and can not reach them, you're asked to call 311. From outside New York City, you can call 212-639-9675.

By CBS New York Team
 

Chopper 2 over the scene in Brooklyn

Please watch below for live images of the developing situation in Brooklyn.

Chopper 2 Flying

Chopper 2 is over the scene of a shooting incident at a Brooklyn subway station. See complete local coverage on CBS News New York: http://cbsloc.al/cbsnewsnewyork

Posted by CBS New York on Tuesday, April 12, 2022
By CBS New York Team
 

At least 16 injuries reported

Police say that 10 people suffered gunshot wounds in the incident. One those injured is in critical condition. 

The victims are being treated at several hospitals. 

Several victims treated at NYU Langone Brooklyn 02:10

Eight are being treated at NYU Langone-Brooklyn.

Five at Maimonides Medical Center. 

Three at New York Presbyterian-Brooklyn Methodist. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Security expert: "They were like sitting ducks"

Security expert on search for subway suspect 07:43

Steve Kardian, a retired NYPD detective, tells CBS2 about the next steps in the investigation and search for suspect.

By CBS New York Team
 

UPDATE: 10 people treated for gunshot wounds

The NYPD now says that 10 people have been treated for gunshot wounds. 

Initially, five people had been believed to have been shot. 

Police now believe more than one smoke bomb was set off in the subway car. 

Eight of the wounded are being treated at NYU Langone Hospital-Brooklyn. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Witnesses describe chaotic scene

CBS2's Leah Mishkin spoke with some witnesses on the scene who described the chaos.

Witnesses describe chaos in Brooklyn 18:25

One couple said they were supposed to be on the train at the time but something didn't feel right.

"Thank God I no go," the woman said. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Security expert weighs in: "Still very dangerous"

Security expert weighs in on Brooklyn subway incident 06:30

Manny Gomez, a former NYPD sergeant and FBI agent, tells CBS2 about the next steps in the investigation and search for suspect.

By CBS New York Team
 

Video shows straphanger helping injured passenger

Video posted on Twitter shows a straphanger on the subway applying pressure to the wound of an injured person. The search continues for the suspect. 

Five people were shot after a suspect threw a smoke bomb onto a subway car and opened fire. One of the persons shot was in critical condition. Several others suffered smoke inhalation related injuries. 

By CBS New York Team
 

Video shows aftermath of the incident

Video posted on Twitter shows people at 4th Avenue and 36th Street exiting the train in a cloud of smoke. 

By CBS New York Team
 

President Biden briefed on the shooting, FBI investigating

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki says President Joe Biden has been briefed and White House officials have been in touch with Mayor Eric Adams and Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell. 

The FBI has also joined the investigation. 

By CBS New York Team
 

NYPD: Subways are not stopped between stations

The NYPD says no trains have been stopped in tunnels, and that all trains have been moved into stations. The investigation and search for the suspect continues. 

By CBS New York Team