Clinton Foundation a problem for Hillary's campaign?

The Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation is changing the way it accepts foreign donations because of Hillary's presidential campaign. Critics say the charity takes millions of dollars a year from governments and other donors that want political influence.

The changes in policy acknowledge the liability the foundation could pose for her presidential bid, reports CBS News correspondent Julianna Goldman.

The Clinton Foundation has funded health, poverty and climate-focused work. Since 2001, it has taken in at least $42 million in donations from foreign governments to fund those grants.

"I am very proud of the work the foundation does and I am very proud of the hundreds of thousands of people who support the work of the foundation," Hillary says.

Under the new policies, the Clinton foundation will accept large donations from six foreign governments - Australia, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway and the United Kingdom.

The foundation will stop taking millions of dollars from all other countries, including Saudi Arabia, whose contributions have been a source of criticism.

On Sunday's "Face the Nation," Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul dug in.

"She's taken money from countries that abuse the rights of women," Paul said. "I think we should be boycotting that activity, not encouraging it and it looks really bad for the case of defending women's rights."

Foreign governments can still participate in the Clinton Global Initiative, a subsidiary of the foundation, and pay attendance fees.

"I think that to people who want to support the foundation, know full well what it is we stand for and what we're working on," Clinton said.

Foundation officials say the new policies are more stringent than when Clinton was secretary of state.

In 2009, the foundation agreed to greater transparency and to limit foreign donations as part of a deal with the Obama administration, but it never stopped taking money from foreign companies or individuals with ties to their governments. The new rules don't address that, either.

In March, CBS News uncovered a $2 million donation from Rilin Enterprises, a Chinese company run by billionaire Wang Wenliang, who is a delegate to the Chinese parliament and whose firm helped build the Chinese embassy in Washington.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said Wednesday night that any foreign government funding "should set off alarm bells."

The foundation will evolve in other ways, disclosing donors "quarterly" in three-month increments, instead of annually. Its next filing will be in July.