Where does President Trump’s approval rating stand?

In this March 31, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with the National Association of Manufacturers in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington.

AP

President Trump's approval ratings continue to hover somewhere in the mid-forties, according to a host of recent polls.

Forty-three percent of Americans said they approve of the job the president is doing in a YouGov poll released Wednesday, while 47 percent said they disapprove.

In a Reuters/Ipsos poll released Tuesday, 44 percent of Americans said they approve of the president's job performance, and 51 percent said they disapprove.

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And in a Gallup poll also released Tuesday, the president's numbers were even deeper underwater: 42 percent said they approve of the job he's doing, while 54 percent said they disapprove.

The latest CBS News survey, released last week, showed a similar spread: 41 percent said they approve, and 53 percent said they disapprove.

The YouGov survey found the public split on some of Trump's recent policy moves. Forty percent of respondents said they approve of the way the president is handling tensions with North Korea, for example, while 33 percent said they disapprove. 27 percent had no opinion.

Seventy-three percent of respondents told YouGov they'd heard a lot or a little about Mr. Trump's tax plan, but only 33 percent said they support it. Thirty-five percent said they oppose it, and 32 percent had no opinion.

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The survey showed greater support for the president's recent declaration that he would either renegotiate or terminate the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fifty-six percent said they approved of Mr. Trump's proposal, while only 19 percent said they disapprove. 25 percent said they have no opinion.

The YouGov survey polled 1,500 Americans between April 29 and May 2, and it had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percent.

Gallup's poll surveyed 1,500 Americans between April 29 and May 1, and it has a margin of error of plus or minus three percent.

The Reuters/Ipsos survey contacted 2,224 Americans between April 27 and May 1, and it has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.4 percent.

And the CBS News poll surveyed 1,214 Americans between April 21 and 24, and it has a margin of three percent.