The End Is Nigh

Tiffany Lee of Jacksonville, Fla., demonstrates outside where the Democratic National Rules and Bylaws Committee
Tiffany Lee of Jacksonville, Fla., demonstrates outside where the Democratic National Rules and Bylaws Committee is meeting, Saturday, May 31, 2008, in Washington, to determine how to count the primary votes for Michigan and Florida. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)[Click image
AP Photo/Kevin Wolf
Weekly commentary by CBS Evening News chief Washington correspondent and Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer.
Despite all the hollering and general rudeness at the meeting of the Democratic Rules Committee that played out on television yesterday, by this time next week the primary season may finally be over, and both parties may have a nominee.

I know. I know.

When the committee gave those disputed delegates from Michigan and Florida only half a vote and dealt a serious blow to Senator Clinton's chances, her supporters shouted, "No-bama" and "McCain in '08." And her main man Harold Ickes threatened to take the fight all the way to the convention.

Even after what we heard this morning, I doubt that.

Here is why: Once we get through these last three contests this week, Senator Obama will be very close to having the delegates he needs to win the nomination.

When that becomes obvious, I expect a sizable group of superdelegates will swing behind him. They'll race to get the credit for being the ones who put him over the top - such is the nature of politics, and the desire to be on the winning team.

Once Senator Obama has those delegates in hand, it will be all but impossible for Senator Clinton to take them away from him - and she is smart enough to know the nomination wouldn't be worth much at that point even if she did: The bluster and bad tempers we saw yesterday showed how deep the division in the Democratic Party already is.

I think this thing is about done.


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By Bob Schieffer
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    Bob Schieffer is a CBS News political contributor and former anchor of "Face The Nation," which he moderated for 24 years before retiring in 2015.