Did ISIS use soda can bomb to bring down Russian plane?

WASHINGTON -- ISIS released a photo Wednesday of what it claims is the bomb that brought down the Russian jetliner in Egypt.

It's a soda can, detonator and a switch. It doesn't look like much, but ATF special agent Kirk Dennis -- an explosives expert -- says it could do a lot of damage.

An image published online by ISIS on Nov. 18, 2015, shows what the group claims to be the bomb used to destroy a Russian Metrojet airliner as it flew over Egypt's Sinai Peninsula on Oct. 31, 2015. The image could not be independently verified.
An image published online by ISIS on Nov. 18, 2015, shows what the group claims to be the bomb used to destroy a Russian Metrojet airliner as it flew over Egypt's Sinai Peninsula on Oct. 31, 2015. The image could not be independently verified.

"I think it would depend on where they placed it on the plane and how much explosives were in the soda can, but I believe it could," Dennis told CBS News.

ISIS published the image in its official propaganda magazine along with this message: "...revenge was exacted upon those who felt safe in the cockpits of their jets."

ISIS releases purported picture of Russian plane bomb

The group's claim that the soda can bomb brought down the Russian plane has not been verified. On Tuesday, the Russian government confirmed the crash in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula was caused by terrorism. And Russian president Vladimir Putin vowed to hunt down those responsible for killing all 224 people on board.

Investigators say an "airport insider" in Sharm El-Sheikh may have planted the bomb. The Russians say it contained about two pounds of TNT. A U.S counterterrorism official says ISIS in the Sinai is one of group's "most active and potent affiliates."

Dennis said to stop something like that from getting on a plane, airports need "good security, screening methods, vetting your people, things of that nature."

ISIS is known to boast about its successful terror operations and has published details about other attacks in the past.

Out of an abundance of caution, an advisory was sent out to U.S. law enforcement Wednesday to be on the lookout for similar types of bomb components.