Banksy alters painting, donates to NYC charity

Work by British graffiti artist Banksy is displayed on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The building owner has hired security guards and installed a metal gate to protect a work by Banksy. Cara Tabachnick, whose family owns the building, said the goal is to preserve the artwork "so it can be viewed and enjoyed." Most of the Banksy works that have gone up have been tagged over by others, and some have been completely erased. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said last week that graffiti ruins property and is "a sign of decay."
AP Photo/Alyssa Goodman

The secretive British graffiti artist Banksy is at it again.

After buying a painting of a pastoral scene for $50, Banksy donated it back to the thrift shop where he bought it Tuesday -- but only after reworking it, adding a Nazi soldier to the scene.

As he does with all his works, Banksy posted the image on his website. He titled it "The banality of the banality of evil." He also included a photograph that shows the painting in the thrift shop's front window.

The 23rd Street Housing Works store is auctioning the painting. By Wednesday morning, bidding reached $211,000. The auction ends Thursday.

It'll benefit Housing Works' homelessness and AIDS initiatives.

On Sunday, Banksy posted an essay that called the design of the World Trade Center a "disaster." Banksy has been in New York over the past few weeks and even set up a table in New York City's Central Park, where he sold original pieces for as little as $60 a piece.