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22-year-old man with autism honors frontline workers with balloon art

Man with autism brings joy with balloon art

Eddie Lin has been making balloon art since he was 10, and now he's turned his talent into a business. The 22-year-old from Edison, New Jersey, created "Ausome Balloon Creator" — and that's not a typo in the name. "It stands for Eddie's autistic trait, only one of his many unique qualities," his mom Jenny explains on the business' Facebook page.

Lin can make hundreds of different balloon designs, but his favorites are Marvel superheroes, he told CBS News. On April 28, National Superhero Day, Lin decided to go a different route with his balloon art. He honored the heroes that don't wear capes – the nurses, doctors and other first responders who are selflessly working during this time.

It’s National Superhero Day! We want everyone to remember that not all superheroes wear capes (or are in the Marvel Universe). Some of them are right in our community, working hard to help keep us safe!

Posted by Ausome Balloon Creator on Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Lin showed off his balloon designs on Facebook and they went viral. "We've found balloons simply bring joy to people," Jenny Lin told CBS News. "When we deliver a balloon arrangement, you just see faces light up with happiness and excitement. We think in a darker and unprecedented time as now, Eddie's story so happens to shine brighter than usual."

Lin's mom said he learned how to make simple balloon art by watching YouTube videos. He then learned more intricate designs from a balloon artist in Taiwan he would meet with when he was visiting family there.

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Eddie Lin made a nurse, doctor and mailman to honor the frontline workers who continue to work during the pandemic.  Ausome Balloon Creator

Now, Lin makes balloons for all types of occasions  weddings, showers, birthdays, school dances and more. "Fun story, we were asked to make balloons for a funeral," Jenny Lin told CBS News. "We were confused by the request. The family members of the deceased explained that it was more a celebration of life and they wanted balloons to make the guests happy."

"Unfortunately, due to stay at home laws, this fell through. But it goes to show, if it's bringing joy, or celebrating a life, balloons always belong," she continued. 

Lin said Ausome Balloon Creator has actually been more busy during this time of quarantine. "It means a lot to our whole family that Eddie's talent and story are bringing joy and hope to people," she said. "People across the globe are reaching out to us and sharing how Eddie and his balloons have brightened their days and lifted their spirits."

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