Taylor Swift trademarked "this sick beat"

Taylor Swift performs onstage during iHeartRadio Jingle Ball 2014, hosted by Z100 New York and presented by Goldfish Puffs at Madison Square Garden on Dec. 12, 2014, in New York.

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Taylor Swift must have been getting down about the "liars and the cheaters of the world" when she trademarked the phrase "this sick beat."

From now on, only Swift will be able to sell merchandise with the "Shake It Off" lyric, which appears on her Grammy-nominated album, "1989."

And the law doesn't stop there; she's also filing to own the rights to phrases like "Party Like It's 1989," "'Cause We Never Go Out of Style," "Nice to Meet You. Where You Been?" and "Could Show You Incredible Things," with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

In doing so, Swift will prevent anyone else from using such phrases on "Paper products; Printed products; Printed publications; Stationery; Stickers; Decals; Decalcomanias; [and] Removable tattoo transfers," among others.

Once again Taylor proves she's a wildly savvy businesswoman. At least she isn't trademarking "All the lonely Starbucks lovers." That's what she said, right?