Witness describes trying to save kids from Easter attack in Pakistan

A Taliban faction claims responsibility for a devastating terror attack in Pakistan that targeted Christians enjoying the Easter weekend. The suicide bombing Sunday killed 70 people and wounded at least 300 others, many of them women and children.

The attack took place in a park filled with families in the eastern city of Lahore, one of Pakistan's most sophisticated and liberal cities, where the poor, rural areas are under the control of extremists, reports CBS News correspondent Elizabeth Palmer.

In the confusion, ambulances loaded up the injured while desperate parents searched for lost children, hoping they wouldn't find them among the dead.

Only hours before, the scene of the attacks had been a crowded amusement park. The bomber wanted to kill the Christians in the crowd celebrating Easter.

"I carried 20 children to be taken to hospital. I moved three bodies to a police car. At the time of the blast, the children were taking a ride at the fairground," said a witness.

At the hospital, it was clear though that the victims included both Muslims and Christians.

Families watched over young, lucky survivors.

"We received a total of 137 patients and 36 received dead and the rest, about 60 of them, had been sent home," said Professor Mahmood Shaukat.

As the funerals get underway Monday, Christians across Pakistan will be watching. Already a minority, this attack makes it clear they face violence aimed at them specifically because of their faith, and adds fears to the grief.

At the fairground, police have begun their investigation, but the basics are already known. Jamaat ul Araar -- a breakaway Taliban faction -- has already claimed responsibility for the atrocity.

The group is also already warning it is planning more of the same.