Army vet arrested in foiled terror plot apparently wrote: "America needs another Vegas event"

U.S. Army vet arrested in foiled terror plot
U.S. Army vet arrested in foiled terror plot 02:32

A U.S. Army veteran is being held without bail, accused of plotting an attack to avenge the killing of Muslims. Mark Domingo, 26, faces terrorism-related charges after his arrest in an FBI sting. Prosecutors say he planned to set off a bomb in Long Beach, California, on Sunday.

Authorities say the infantryman who served a combat stint in Afghanistan recently converted to Islam and was quickly radicalized, reports CBS News correspondent Jonathan Vigliotti.

The investigation began after the FBI saw an apparent online post from Domingo, saying: "America needs another Vegas event" to give "a taste of the terror they gladly spread all over the world" – referring to the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas that killed 58 people.

He also allegedly sought "retribution" for last month's mosque killings in New Zealand.

Federal prosecutors say Domingo claimed Americans should be punished for attacks on Muslims around the world. Investigators believe he worked alone on this apparent terror plot for two months and said he was under constant surveillance leading up to his arrest.

"Sometimes we get asked, what keeps you up at night. This is a case that keeps us up at night," said Ryan Young, special agent for FBI task force.

Investigators said the arrest of Domingo prevented revenge-fueled bloodshed.

"Law enforcement was able to identify a man consumed with hate and bent on mass murder and stop him," U.S. attorney Nick Hanna said.

Prosecutors allege Domingo planned to detonate a bomb Sunday at a white nationalist rally in Long Beach, California. But he was arrested Friday after taking possession of what he thought was an IED from an undercover FBI agent, while scoping out a spot in a park to plant the bomb. The explosive was a dummy.

"Mr. Domingo said that he wanted to kill Jews as they walked to synagogue… at other times he said he wanted to kill and target police officers," Hanna said.

James Domingo said he thought his brother's religious conversion helped him cope with personal issues. "I am speechless at this," he said, adding, "I thought maybe my brother finally found some sort of guidance in this world."

Authorities said Domingo had no prior criminal record. If convicted, he could face up to 15 years in prison.