Las Vegas sheriff says he believes gunman "had to have help at some point"

Las Vegas sheriff Joseph Lombardo said that while there are no "concrete" examples of any accomplices, he believes that gunman Stephen Paddock "had to have help at some point" to kill 58 people and injure 489 others on Sunday.

"Do you think this was all accomplished on his own?" Lombardo said to reporters on Wednesday. "Self value, face value, you got to make the assumption that he had to have had some help at some point. And we want to ensure that that's the answer. Maybe he's a super guy ... [he] was working out all of this on his own. But it'd be hard for me to believe that."

Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay at 10:05 p.m. and shot for 10 minutes, according to Lombardo. Officers arrived on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay within 12 minutes of the shooting, and systematically searched and evacuated the floor and formulated a plan to enter Paddock's room. When they did enter, they found him dead on the ground.

Paddock's motive is still unclear. He did not leave a suicide note, Lombardo said. 

"While we have already spoken to many people who have contacted with Stephen Paddock at hotels and places he frequented, we still have more interviews to conduct," Lombardo said.    

Lombardo said "more than 100 investigators have spent the last 72 hours combing through the life of 64-year-old Stephen Paddock to produce a profile of someone I would call disturbed and dangerous."

Paddock attempted to book a room at Las Vegas' downtown Ogden condo complex through Airbnb. While Paddock's reasoning for coming to the Ogden are still unknown, his time at the Ogden would have coincided with the Life Is Beautiful music festival. 

Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting, and spoke to investigators on Wednesday. Her attorney said Wednesday that she had no idea about the attack plans, although authorities say she is key to understanding what motivated Paddock.

The ATF said Paddock had 24 guns in his hotel room, and 12 of them had bump fire stocks. The legal devices are attached to the back of rifles and allow squeezed triggers to slide back and forth more quickly, simulating automatic fire.  

Guns & Guitars general manager Christopher Sullivan told CBS News he sold Paddock a rifle on Sept. 28.

"I was ill. It made me physically ill to think that we had interacted with him and he had committed such a tragedy," Sullivan said.