Sketch comedy virtuosos "Key & Peele" sign off in finale

Ian White

In a smattering of skits that showed how they became sketch comedy virtuosos, comedy duo "Key & Peele" signed off Wednesday from their popular show after five funny seasons.

Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele first met each other back in the early 2000s while at Chicago's The Second City improv theater, reports CBSN's Vladimir Duthiers. The resulting friendship and comedic chemistry that developed between the two helped alter the sketch comedy landscape.

Their comedy was sharp, topical and satirical. Conformity was never their brand, as they habitually blurred the line between comedy and current events. Key and Peele tackled race relations and politics.

"I've received my fair share of criticism from the Republican Party," Peele said, acting as President Obama in one sketch.

"Pfft! I can't even give Malia an allowance without them accusing me of wealth re-distribution!" Key said without missing a beat, also acting as Mr. Obama in the same sketch.

Their Obama translator skit made it all the way to this year's White House correspondent's dinner.

They dove head-first into social issues, religion and everything in between.

They enjoyed ratings success and critical acclaim, winning a Peabody award in 2013 and garnering 11 Emmy nominations. Last October, the comedy duo told "CBS This Morning" their goal was to shock the audience.

"Our favorite thing, we want everybody to watch the sketch and get up and walk off the couch," Key said.

"You put the dog on the leash and get outside for a second. But so I think what happens is, it's the surprise. And it's because we're improvisers. So a lot of the sketches, the writing has to go out the window and you have to just let us ... go organically," Key added.

The end of their Comedy Central show doesn't signal the end of these two working together. They have a slate of joint projects lined up, including a Police Academy re-boot, and a new comedy called "Keanu," which is due out in theaters next year.