Jerry Springer In A Political Mood

Jerry Springer speaks to reporters as he arrives at the "Jump-off" party hosted by Rock the Vote and Democratic Gain Boston 2004, Sunday, July 25, 2004, in Boston.
AP
Jerry Springer's new radio talk show doesn't have guests who get in fist fights or blurt foul language.

Springer promised to provide unabashed liberal views to counter the positions of President Bush in the first airing Monday of his radio show in Cincinnati.

Springer, who will continue to host his more raucous TV show, called the war in Iraq immoral, saying it appeared to be focused on determining whether Iraq's Shiite majority or Sunni minority will be in charge as the country tries to grow into independence.

"Would you be willing to have your son or daughter die for that?" said Springer, whose show biz career was preceded by a successful run in politics, including serving as mayor of Cincinnati, one of the nation's youngest mayors at the time.

Springer politely received those who called in to his radio show, in contrast to the conflict-oriented style of his TV show.

Some see the radio show as a springboard for the Democrat's possible return to politics in 2006, although Springer has declined to comment on that issue.

Pam Stevens, a spokeswoman for the White House, declined comment on Springer's show. Before Springer's debut, Ohio Republicans were dismissive.

"This is a guy who peddles smut for a living," said Jason Mauk, a spokesman for the state Republican Party.