How to Get Kids Interested in Science

Is science your child's favorite subject in school? If it's not, it could be.

Scientist Robert Kernstock shared the tips below with "Eye on Parenting" to help parents encourage an interest in science with their kids.

Be inquisitive together - Explore science in your own home through creative and fun experiments - there are endless experiment ideas using common household items. Enjoy being inquisitive with you children and teach them to appreciate the joy of discovery!

Bring science into the conversation - Show your children how everything in life relates back to science -- from the food we eat and the air we breathe, to how our bodies work and the chemicals involved in creating products we use. Tie science into what they have going on this fall, such as how their bodies digest all of the Halloween candy they're going to get!

Make connections - Discuss real life applications of the science lessons they are learning in school, and encourage them to ask their teachers about how real scientists use this information. If you have friends or family members who are scientists or work in a field with scientists, engage them in a discussion with your children about what they do.

Take a hike - Autumn is the perfect time a year to get out and explore nature. Children can learn so much by observing the plants and animals around them. Encourage them to take notes on what they observe, and return during a different season to discover the differences.

Get them involved - Many schools have science clubs that reinforce how science is a part of our everyday lives and how to make science a career. Encourage your child to become involved at school or with other organizations that can encourage a passion for science.

Robert Kernstock is a principal scientist at Astellas Pharma. He is a career scientist responsible for developing methods to measure drugs and biomarkers in clinical trials. Kernstock is also a leading scientific advisor for Science WoRx, a program designed to inspire the next generation of scientists through mentoring and an online resource network for science teachers. For more information, visit or