Rio struggles to cross Olympics finish line on time

With just over six weeks left until the Olympic games in Rio de Janeiro, problems are still growing.

Two members of the Australian Paralympic team are recovering after being robbed at gunpoint near their hotel in Rio. In addition to safety, there are also worries about Zika, a newly declared state of financial emergency, Brazil's impeached president and allegations of corruption.

The president of the International Olympic Committee came to Rio to check on the city's progress and unveil the summer Olympics medals.

"Brazil needs now the most, something which is unifying the country because we see, from outside, we see deep divisions," said IOC President Thomas Bach.

With just over six weeks from the start of the Olympic Games, almost all of the venues at Rio's Olympic park are now complete, but all over the city, they are still rushing to get a lot of work done, reports CBS News correspondent Ben Tracy.

Rio's Olympic-sized troubles

Giant stands for spectators to watch volleyball are going up on Copacabana Beach and a new highway to the Olympic park just opened. But a new $2.8 billion mass transit extension is still very much unfinished. The long-delayed subway project is critical to transporting what will eventually be as many as 300,000 people every day. This isn't scheduled to open until four days before the games begin.

While one iconic beach city gets an Olympic-sized face-lift, it's not being felt in Rio's poor areas, like the favelas that sprawl over the city's hillsides.

Felipe Paiva said the more than $11 billion being spent on the games won't make his life better or safer.

"It's a commercial for the foreigners, for the investors," Paiva said. "The investment is not for us, it's for the foreigners."

We wanted to ask Rio's Mayor Eduardo Paes about that criticism and the still horribly polluted waters many athletes will be competing in. But he cancelled an interview with us twice on the same day a major media outlet accused him of corruption.

He is not alone. Brazil is scandal-plagued and now impeached President Dilma Roussef could be formally removed from office just days before the games begin.

Yet, Brazil's Interim President Michel Temer said the world won't care about the political crisis once the Olympic cauldron is lit.

That's assuming Rio crosses its construction finish line on time.