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New To Hockey? Here's A Crash Course On Rules And Terms You Might Hear With The Avalanche In The Stanley Cup Final

(CBS4) - The Colorado Avalanche are headed back to the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since winning it all in 2001. In that time, a whole new generation of hockey fans has grown up in our state, but spurred on by the Avs' Cup run, many are coming to the game for the first time.

When those new fans tune in, they may hear a lot of new hockey terms. So what does it all mean? Here's a Hockey 101 breakdown of what you might hear.

NHL: MAY 07 Avalanche at Kings
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 07: Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen (96) celebrates with Colorado Avalanche center Tyson Jost (17), Colorado Avalanche defenseman Devon Toews (7) and Colorado Avalanche left wing Gabriel Landeskog (92) during the NHL regular season hockey game against the Los Angeles Kings on Friday, May 7, 2021 at Staples Center in Los Angeles, Calif. (Photo by Ric Tapia/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Faceoff
A faceoff happens at the beginning of each period and after stoppages in play. The referee drops the puck between two offensive players, who then fight for possession of the puck.

Offside
This is called when players on the attacking team cross the blue line of the offensive zone before the puck gets there. There is no penalty, but play is stopped and a faceoff is held.

Icing
The term used when a team shoots the puck from its side of the center red line across the opposing goal line.

Checking
There are several types of checking in a hockey game, but generally speaking, a check is the use of the body or stick with the intent to disrupt an opponent's possession of the puck, or to separate him entirely from the puck. Most are clean, legal plays. Charging, which is hitting from behind, and boarding, which is shoving a player into the walls of the rink, are both illegal types of checking and are quite dangerous.

Colorado Avalanche v Edmonton Oilers - Game Three
EDMONTON, ALBERTA - JUNE 04: Logan O'Connor #25 of the Colorado Avalanche checks Connor McDavid #97 of the Edmonton Oilers in the second period in Game Three of the Western Conference Final of the 2022 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Rogers Place on June 04, 2022 in Edmonton, Alberta. (Photo by Codie McLachlan/Getty Images)

Power Play
When a team commits and penalty, and a player from that team is sent to the Penalty Box, that team then loses one of their five offensive players on the ice for the duration of the penalty. The opposing team continues to play with all five offensive players.

Penalty Kill
The term used when the team with a player in the penalty box does not allow a goal while down a player. When the player returns, that team is then back at Full Strength. 

Crease
The crease is the blue-shaded area of the ice immediately in front of the goal where the goalie plays his position. The goalie is protected from most types of contact while inside the crease.

Colorado Avalanche v Edmonton Oilers - Game Three
EDMONTON, ALBERTA - JUNE 04: Nathan MacKinnon #29 of the Colorado Avalanche and goalie Pavel Francouz #39 defend the net against Zach Hyman #18 of the Edmonton Oilers in the first period in Game Three of the Western Conference Final of the 2022 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Rogers Place on June 04, 2022 in Edmonton, Alberta. (Photo by Derek Leung/Getty Images)

Pipes
A colloquial term used to describe the goal. Announcers will sometimes describe goalies as "between the pipes."

Sweater
A colloquial term for hockey jerseys. In the early days of hockey, players would wear actual sweaters on the ice.

Hat Trick
The term used when a player scores three goals in a game. If that player scores three consecutive goals in a game, it's called a Natural Hat Trick. If a player records a goal, an assist, and participates in a fight, the unofficial stat is called a Gordie Howe Hat Trick, named for one of the greatest hockey players of all time.

Forwards vs. Defensemen
Hockey teams field six players on the ice at a time - three forwards, two defenseman, and a goalie. The forwards, comprised of a Center, a Right Winger, and a Left Winger, play the most offensive. Defensemen play defense when the opposing team is on offense, and usually play close to the goal. When their team is on offense, they play closer to the blue line.

Colorado Avalanche v Edmonton Oilers - Game Three
EDMONTON, ALBERTA - JUNE 04: Nathan MacKinnon #29 of the Colorado Avalanche looks to pass against Derek Ryan #10 of the Edmonton Oilers in the third period in Game Three of the Western Conference Final of the 2022 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Rogers Place on June 04, 2022 in Edmonton, Alberta. (Photo by Codie McLachlan/Getty Images)

Why can players fight in hockey? 
Fighting is an accepted in hockey to a point. Seemingly barbaric, players sometimes take policing of the game into their own hands if they feel referees are not calling penalties properly and to "penalize" opposing players for committing infractions that may not have been properly called by referees. Hockey players abide by a "code" to prevent injuries and keep fighting regulated. For example, fighting is to stop when a player hits the ice or if asked. Most fights result in a two-minute minor penalty, though some larger fights involving multiple players may result in a five-minute major penalty or a game misconduct penalty.

Nashville Predators v Colorado Avalanche - Game One
DENVER, COLORADO - MAY 03: Bowen Byram #4 of the Colorado Avalanche fights with Nick Cousins #21 of the Nashville Predators in the third period during Game One of the First Round of the 2022 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Capital One Arena at Ball Arena on May 03, 2022 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

PENALTIES
Delayed Penalty
The term used when a penalty is called but play is not stopped until the team that committed the violation controls the puck.

Minor Penalty
Most penalties in hockey are classified as minor penalties. Players who commit a minor penalty (outlined below) must serve two minutes in the Penalty Box and the other team is awarded a two-minute Power Play.

Blackhawks Defeat Avalanche, 3-2
Nick Holden #2 of the Colorado Avalanche heads to the penalty box against the Chicago Blackhawks at Pepsi Center on November 26, 2014 in Denver, Colorado. The Blackhawks defeated the Avalanche 3-2. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

Major Penalty
A major penalty is assessed for severe penalties that present danger to players, most commonly boarding and charging. The guilty player must serve five minutes in the Penalty Box, and the other team is awarded a five-minute Power Play.

Game Misconduct
A ten-minute penalty assessed for excessive poor sportsmanship.

Penalty Shot
A penalty shot is awarded when a player who has the puck in either the neutral zone or attacking zone, and does not have an opponent to pass except the goalie, is fouled from behind and thus prevented from having a clear shot on goal.

Delay of Game
This minor penalty can be assessed against a player who causes the game to be paused, such as causing the goal to come off its moorings, a player holding an airborne puck and not dropping it to the ice immediately, a puck intentionally shot out of play, or a player or goalie keeping the puck behind the net for more than a minute. Referees may assess a delay of game penalty against the bench for engaging in activities that postpone play or if fans throw objects onto the ice to disrupt the game. Starting in the 2017-2018 season, delay of game penalties are now also assessed against teams for unsuccessful coach's challenges. 

High-Sticking
The term used for any stick contact of an opponent above the shoulders.

Boarding
The term used when a player pushes, checks, or trips another player causing them to fall or slide dangerously into the boards, or walls of the rink. This is a Major Penalty.

Colorado Avalanche vs Edmonton Oilers Game Three Western Conference Finals
EDMONTON, ALBERTA - JUNE 04: Colorado Avalanche center Nazem Kadri (91) down on the ice after a hit by Edmonton Oilers left wing Evander Kane (91) in the first period during game three of the NHL Stanley Cup Western Conference Finals at Rogers Place June 04, 2022. Kadri left the game, Kane got a five-minute major. (Photo by Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Charging
The term used when a player takes more than two strides or "travels an excessive distance" to gain speed for a check against an opposing player. This is a Major Penalty.

Cross-Checking
The term used when a player uses the shaft of his stick to forcefully check an opponent.

Holding
The term used when a player uses his arms to restrain his opponent.

Colorado Avalanche v Edmonton Oilers - Game Four
EDMONTON, ALBERTA - JUNE 06: Andre Burakovsky #95 of the Colorado Avalanche and Cody Ceci #5 of the Edmonton Oilers battle for the puck during the second period in Game Four of the Western Conference Final of the 2022 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Rogers Place on June 06, 2022 in Edmonton, Alberta. (Photo by Codie McLachlan/Getty Images)

Hooking
The term used when a player uses his stick to restrain his opponent.

Interference
The term used when a player interferes with or impedes the progress of his opponent who does not have possession of the puck.

Roughing
The term used when a player uses a punching motion directed at an opponent's head, or after a small fight between two players deemed not worthy of a major penalty to either player.

Slashing
The term used when a player chops his opponent's body with a stick or hands that is not an attempt to make a play on the puck.

Tripping
The term used when a player uses his stick, knee, foot, arm, hand, or elbow to cause an opponent to trip and fall.

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