What's changed in Ferguson since Mike Brown's death

FERGUSON, Mo. -- The images are unforgettable: fiery protests in Ferguson and across America, sparked by the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Shortly after Brown's death, a Justice Department report critical of police practices triggered changes within the department.

The city now has its first black police chief, Delrish Moss.

"As my officers are concerned most have them have been really primed to move forward. They want to see change," Moss said. "You have to respect everyone's walk and come to the table. I think we all want to get to the same place but we have different views about how to get there."

Moss has placed a priority on community policing. He now requires his officers to get out of their patrol cars and meet residents.

Other changes have been implemented. All Ferguson police are now fitted with body cameras. There is more diversity within the police department. There's been a reduction in vehicle stops of African-American drivers.

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In this Aug. 13, 2014 file photo, police walk through a cloud of smoke as they clash with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. The Justice Department concluded that police antagonized crowds gathered to protest the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, violated free-speech rights and made it difficult to hold officers accountable.

AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File

Yet, two years later, Michael Brown's father, Mike Brown Sr., still believes more needs to be done.

"What we need to do and what we're trying to do is build this trust somewhere between the police and the community," he said. "Because our people don't trust the police, brother. Our children are afraid of the police, brother."

To better reflect the community, the Ferguson police has increased the number of black officers from four to seven out of the 36-member force. That number is expected to increase when it fills 12 open positions.