Video Resumes: 7 Tips for Making Yours Great

Last Updated Aug 18, 2010 1:26 PM EDT

Someday soon, the video resume will no longer be a novelty; it'll be a necessity. If you want to get ahead of the curve, The Ladders offers 7 video resume tips from a video pro. Check out the first three:
  1. Employers review most paper resumes in less than 10 seconds; bear that in mind and keep your clips short.
  2. Don't bother with VHS tapes, DVDs or CD-ROMs. Provide a link to the video resume instead.
  3. Don't use YouTube, Vimeo or any other video-server service where other material may provide distractions. Many companies block their employees' access to those sites anyway.
Regarding this third tip, the author fails to mention any alternatives to YouTube and the like. I've got one: Just create your "drop" (i.e. upload your video), then share the link with prospective employers.

The tips come from Townley Paton, president of, a site that helps you create and share interview-oriented video clips. Some of them are, I must admit, a bit lame, but pay special attention to tip #7: "Beware of poor production values. Not using a tripod; low camera quality; poor sound; rough compression; or worst of all, poor lighting, will kill your chances of making a good impression." (That should have been tip #2, if not #1.)

Have you ever created a video resume? Thought about it? I haven't had to apply for a job in a while (lucky me!), but the next time the need arises, you can bet I'll be doing it in front of the camera. I think a video resume can be so much more effective than the paper variety.

Agree? Disagree? Let's hear from you in the comments!

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