Sarah Palin's view

Former Governor Sarah Palin of Alaska is not among the many Republicans running for President this time around. But she says she's keeping her long-range options open. Tracy Smith visited with Palin on her home turf:

"Isn't it a gorgeous view? I love wakin' up to this every day," said Wasilla, Alaska's most famous private citizen, who still lives in the same house -- the one she bought before she was a household name.

Smith asked, "After the loss in 2008, did you come back here to kind of nurse your wounds?"

"Came back here, man, 'cause gotta get back to real life, you know?"

"Do you feel like a loser?"

"Well, sure. I mean, you either win or you lose, and it's, like, 'Dang, I wish I coulda added more, contributed more positively.' Maybe there was no chance that we were gonna win anyway."

"Do you feel like you're to blame for the loss in 2008? 'Cause people do blame you."

"Well, it takes a team to win, so it takes a team to lose," said Palin. "I was part of a team that came in second outta two. So, yes, yeah, I mean, semantics, okay, words matter. You either win or you lose. We lost. That makes you not a winner. At that time."

It all began, of course, in the Summer of 2008, when Senator John McCain picked Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, a feisty 44-year-old mother of five, to be his running mate.

"They say the difference between a hockey mom and a pitbull -- lipstick."

At that moment, she had a lot going on in her private life: Palin's oldest son was bound for Iraq; she had a new baby with special needs; and she'd just found out her unmarried teen daughter, Bristol, was pregnant.

Palin was new to national politics, and sometimes it showed. Her every stumble was immortalized, and lampooned. ["I can see Russia from my house!" intoned Tina Fey on "Saturday Night Live."]

She also took a lot of the heat for this awkward moment with then-CBS News anchor Katie Couric:

Couric: "When it comes to establishing your world view, I was curious, what newspapers and magazines did you regularly read before you were tapped for this, to stay informed and to understand the world?"
Palin: "I've read most of them, again with a great appreciation for the press, for the media -"
Couric: "But like, which ones specifically? I'm curious that you -"
Palin: "Um, all of 'em, any of 'em that, um, have, have been in front of me over all these years. Um, I have --"
Couric: "Can you name a few?"
Palin: "I have a vast variety of sources where we get our news. Alaska isn't a foreign country, where it's kinda suggested, it seems like, 'Wow, how could you keep in touch with the rest of Washington D.C. may be thinking and doing when you live up in Alaska?'"
sarah-palin-katie-couric-244.jpg
Sarah Palin with Katie Couric in 2008.
CBS News

Smith asked, "So, do you think, was that a fair question?"

"Sure, yeah," Palin replied. "I had a crappy answer. But it was a fair question. I didn't like, though, the way that forever then in these seven years that interview has kinda been stamped on my forehead, as 'She's an idiot.' I just think in the context of the whole ball of wax that day, or two days of an interview and editing, it wasn't real fun."

And in the end it wasn't even close.

If 2008 was a hard year for Palin, 2015 hasn't been much better. She lost her job as a commentator for Fox News. And this past May, her daughter Bristol's wedding to Marine Medal of Honor recipient Dakota Myer was called off.

"You mentioned that one of your disappointments this year was Bristol's wedding falling through," said Smith.

"Uh-huh."

"The marriage falling through. Bristol's pregnant again."

"Yeah. Yeah."

"That can't be how you saw this playing out -- unmarried and pregnant again?"