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Qualcomm Stadium Ready for Poinsettia Bowl after Floods

This is an aerial shot on the left of Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego on Wednesday during the flood. The field appeared to be under perhaps 10 inches or more of muddy water. On the right is a picture of Qualcomm during normal San Diego weather.
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This is an aerial shot on the left of Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego on Wednesday during the flood. On the right is a picture of Qualcomm during normal San Diego weather.
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Poinsettia Bowl Executive Director Bruce Binkowski says San Diego's Qualcomm Stadium is in "beautiful shape" despite extensive rains throughout California that flooded the stadium for a while Wednesday, reports CBS8-TV.

Officially known as the San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl, Navy and San Diego State University will face off Thursday night at 5 p.m. PST.

Crews have made tremendous progress overnight pumping nearly 3 feet of water off the field.

"They are painting the team logos as we speak!," Binkowski said to a CBS8 reporter early Thursday morning.

On Wednesday afternoon, the tarp covering the field looked more like a pool cover, CBS8 reports. The field appeared to be under perhaps 10 inches or more of muddy water.

A large portion of the parking lot flooded as well, which could cause problems for the expected crowd of 51,000, CBS8 reported. The parking lot is next to the San Diego River, which overflows every time it rains hard.

Those fans planning on coming to the Bowl Game are encouraged to arrive early, and use public transportation if possible, according to Binkowski.

It rained so hard Tuesday that Navy and SDSU practiced in hotel ballrooms, CBS8 reported. SDSU held its Wednesday walk through on campus while Navy found a nearby high school with a turf field.

The field appeared to be under perhaps 10 inches or more of muddy water Wednesday.
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The soaking wet conditions left coaches Ken Niumatalolo of Navy and Brady Hoke of San Diego State vowing to splash through the mud, if that's what it takes, CBS8 reported.

"Sometimes college football has become big business but these are young men that grew up playing football in the backyard when it was raining," Niumatalolo said. "We're excited to strap it on anytime. For our seniors, this is going to be the last time for them to do this.

"Plus we've been practicing on a ballroom carpet, so I think the carryover is going to be minimal."

  • Joshua Norman

    Joshua Norman is a Senior Editor at CBSNews.com.