Passage: Robert Frank and Eddie Money

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This past week we lost a celebrated photographer who documented hardship and isolation in post-war America, and a Grammy-nominated singer known for pop hits of the 1970s and '80s.

CBS News

It happened this past week ... the loss of two creative men of very different talents.

Rock singer Eddie Money died Friday in Los Angeles of cancer.

Born Edward Mahoney in New York City, he broke with his family's tradition of police work, choosing a musical career instead under the name Eddie Money.

He had a hit in the late '70s with "Two Tickets to Paradise," and won a Grammy nomination for "Take Me Home Tonight" in 1987.

Eddie Money - Two Tickets to Paradise (Live 1987) by EddieMoneyVEVO on YouTube

Other hits included his debut single, "Baby Hold On"; "Think I'm in Love"; "I Wanna Go Back"; "The Love in Your Eyes"; "She Takes My Breath Away"; and "Walk on Water."

Last month Money announced that he had stage 4 esophageal cancer, and that his fate was in "God's hands."

Eddie Money was 70.

      
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"Trolley - New Orleans" (1955) by Robert Frank. © Robert Frank, from "The Americans"; courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery

Robert Frank was a leading American photographer, an immigrant from Switzerland who viewed his adopted country with fresh eyes.

During a two-year journey across the United States in the 1950s, Frank took spontaneous and unstaged photographs of humble people and ordinary places in stark black-and-white. His album of photographs, "The Americans," was criticized by some both for its technique and for what was seen as a critique of American ways.

In a 1987 "Sunday Morning" interview, Robert Frank insisted his focus wasn't on politics, but on people:  "I was passionate about losers," he said. "People who were taken advantage of, that really couldn't make it."

From 1987: Robert Frank's "Americans"

Over time, his photographs came to be regarded as ground-breaking classics.

Robert Frank was 94

      
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Story produced by Derrell Bouknight and Robert Marston.