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Did Paris police miss all the clues?

Police also found Koulibaly's hideout in suburban Paris
Police also found Koulibaly's hideout in subu... 02:22

PARIS -- A second round of the Charlie Hebdo newspaper was printed overnight, and as Elizabeth Palmer reports, it flew off the shelves for a second day in a row.

By mid-morning a sign hanging on the side of a newsstand said it all: "No more Charlie - See you tomorrow."

Six days since the attack at the kosher supermarket in eastern Paris, new photos show Amedy Coulibaly, a convicted bank robber, forcing his hostages to destroy security cameras inside the store. He didn't realize the pictures would survive because they were stored remotely.

Over the weekend, police found Coulibali's hideout in a Paris suburb -- and a small arsenal inside.

Weapons found by police inside a Paris apartment where Amedy Coulibaly lived before he died in a police raid on a Kosher grocery store where he killed four hostages
Weapons found by police inside a Paris apartment where Amedy Coulibaly lived before he died in a police raid on a Kosher grocery store where he killed four hostages on Jan. 9, 2015.

After the successful operation to free the hostages on Friday, the police are enjoying a surge of popular support in France, but hard questions are coming about why they didn't pick up warning signs about men with long criminal histories and known sympathies with radical Islam.

In the days before their attack on Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper with a history of offending Muslims by printing caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad, French-Algerian brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi brothers had stolen a car, bought guns and snooped around to find out when the magazine staff held its weekly meeting.

The investigation into the attacks is ongoing... 02:43

The Kouachis were linked to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), which claimed responsibility for the attack on Charlie Hebdo in a video released Wednesday.

Professor Xavier Raufer, who advises the French government on security, says key signs were missed.

"You see two brothers buying hoods, buying Kalashnikovs, and looking around Charlie Hebdo; you don't need to be Sherlock Holmes to understand," said Raufer. "This is what was missed by the French internal intelligence."

Palmer says Paris police did get suspicious over the summer, when the Kouachi brothers quietly moved out of their apartment in the capital to a smaller town. But there was no follow up.

Raufer said that amounted to a "total" policing failure.

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