Mother Outraged By Boot-Camp Videotape

Gina Jones, left, mother of 14-year-old Martin Lee Anderson, wipes her face as her attorney Ben Crump, right, speaks at a news conference regarding the death of her son, Friday, Feb. 17, 2006, in Tallahassee, Fla. Guards at a juvenile detention boot camp kneed and struck Martin Lee Anderson, who appeared to have gone limp while others restrained him on the day before he died, a videotape released Friday showed.
AP
Guards at a juvenile-detention boot camp kneed and struck a teenager who had apparently gone limp while being restrained the day before he died, a videotape released Friday showed.

The scenes from the tape outraged the parents of 14-year-old Martin Lee Anderson. His mother said it proved the guards killed her son, despite a medical examiner's ruling that Anderson died from internal bleeding unrelated to the confrontation.

Anderson, who entered the camp on Jan. 5 because of a probation violation, complained of breathing difficulties and collapsed during exercises that were part of the entry process. He died the next day at a Pensacola hospital.

The county sheriff's office, which runs the camp, said Anderson was restrained after he became uncooperative. But the camp also admitted Friday that mistakes were made, CBS News correspondent Jim Acosta reports.

"It is very obvious to us that there are valid concerns raised in some of the procedures that are being used in this particular incident," said Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen.

On the 1-hour, 20-minute tape, which has no sound, as many as nine guards can be seen restraining Anderson. Guards kneed him and wrestled him to the ground, where he was repeatedly struck by one guard, either on his arm or the side of his torso, while he lay still. He was limp throughout most of it and never appeared to offer significant resistance.


Watch CBSNews.com RAW video of Anderson's parents.
"The viewing of this will result in many questions, concerns and accusations," said Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen.

Anderson's father said his son didn't provoke the guards.

"He was trying to do what they wanted him to do but they still beat him, kicked, punched him, and the nurse stood around there and didn't do nothing," Robert Anderson said.

Anderson's parents watched the tape at their lawyer's office in Tallahassee as the Florida Department of Law Enforcement made it public.

"Martin didn't deserve this right here. At all," said his mother, Gina Jones. "I couldn't even watch the whole tape. Me, as a mom, I knew my baby was in pain, and I am in pain just watching his pain."

She said she walked out of the lawyer's office when the tape showed guards shoving her son up against a pole.

At the beginning of the tape, the guards are seen pinning Anderson against a pole and striking him three times with their knees. At another point, a guard struck him from behind, lifting his feet off the ground.

A woman in a white coat was present while the guards restrained Anderson and at one point used a stethoscope to check him. Near the end of the confrontation, guards appear to become more concerned and several began running in and out of the scene. A few minutes later, emergency medical personnel arrive and put the boy on a gurney and take him away.