New clues in ancient mystery from King Tut's tomb?

The feet of King Tutankhamun are seen at the moving of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tut from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt, Nov. 4, 2007.

AP

CAIRO -- Egyptian Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said Thursday that analysis of scans of famed King Tut's burial chamber has revealed two hidden rooms that could contain metal or organic material.

In a news conference Thursday in Cairo, he said that the Japanese analysis showed chambers that would be scanned again at the end of the month.

The discovery could shine new light on one of ancient Egypt's most turbulent times, and one prominent researcher has theorized that the remains of Queen Nefertiti might be inside.

Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves, from the University of Arizona, told CBS News' Alex Ortiz in September that King Tut's burial chamber was "probably the greatest archaeological discovery that's ever been made," but he believed an even greater discovery could be hidden behind a wall in the very same chamber.

On the other side of that wall, Reeves and his team believe Nefertiti is buried. But they couldn't just knock down the wall to find out; they had to find another way to see through it.

Non-invasive radar and thermal imaging was employed, in part to test Reeves' theory. It is those images the Japanese scientists analyzed.

If he's proven correct, Egypt's Minister of Antiquities said last Autumn that he believed the discovery would be "more important than Tutankhamun."

On Thursday, El-Damaty said he does think the new chambers could contain the tomb of a member of Tutankhmun's family, but he wouldn't speculate on Nefertiti -- who was one of the wives of Tutankhmun's father, the Pharoah Akhenaten, but is not believed to be his mother.

Over the years, many people have claimed to have found the Queen Nefertiti's tomb, but her true resting place remains a mystery.

"If I'm wrong, I'm wrong, we move on," Reeves told CBS News in September. "But it's something that we can't just ignore, because if I happen to be right... it will change everything."