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Jenn Sterger: "Good Old Boys'" NFL Ruling is Sexist

Brett Favre and Jenn Sterger (AP Photo, file)
Brett Favre and Jenn Sterger (AP Photo, file)

(CBS/AP) Jenn Sterger, the allegedly wronged party in the Brett Favre sexting scandal, said in a statement via her lawyer that the NFL's decision to fine and not suspend Favre was "sexist," according to reports.

The TMZ website released a statement sent by Sterger's lawyer, Joseph R. Conway, in which the former New York Jets media personality called Commissioner Roger Goodell's decision extremely disappointing but not surprising.

 "While I am not privy to how Mr. Goodell reached such a finding, we strongly disagree with his conclusion that there was insufficient evidence to support a violation of the policy," the release quotes Jenn as saying.

Jenn's lawyer said, "Our evidence and the personal testimony of Ms. Sterger clearly showed a pattern of lewd and offensive behavior by Mr. Favre that lasted all of the 2008 season. Our evidence clearly showed that the photos were sent by Favre."

Sterger's lawyer concludes, "Today's decision is an affront to all females and shows once again that, despite tough talk, the NFL remains the good old boys' league."

Commissioner Roger Goodell's investigation into improper behavior by Brett Favre with former New York Jets media personality Jenn Sterger has lead to a $50,000 fine and not a suspension, reports the Associated Press.

PICTURES: Jenn Sterger

The league says Commissioner Roger Goodell "could not conclude" that Favre violated the league's personal conduct policy based on the evidence currently available, the AP reports.

Favre was ultimately punished not for the actual text and phone messages, but instead for not cooperating with the league's investigation, the AP reports.

The league's statement also says Goodell determined Favre was "not candid in several respects during the investigation resulting in a longer review and additional negative public attention for Favre, (Jenn) Sterger and the NFL."

Sports Illustrated's Peter King said the league ultimately decided not to suspend Favre because it couldn't prove the photos - some of which included pictures of a penis - were from Favre, or were even of Favre.

Earlier this year, Goodell suspended Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger for six games after he was accused of sexually assaulting a college student during a drunken night out in a Georgia college town over the summer.

No charges were ever filed against Rothlisberger. The suspension was eventually reduced to four games.

  • Joshua Norman

    Joshua Norman is a Senior Editor at CBSNews.com.