Drivers still haunted by California flash floods

CALIFORNIA -- A major trucking route in Southern California will remain closed several more days. A mile long stretch of State Route 58 is still buried in mud up to six feet deep.

From the sky, you get a better feel for the impact of Thursday's 30 minute torrential downpour where three inches of rain turned a normally dry landscape into a mud pit.

The mud pit left nearly 200 cars and 300 people stranded -- truck driver David Noe being one of them.

"I've been through hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, but this is a first for me after 31 years of driving," he said.

In that initial river of mud, there were some dramatic rescues.

Vehicles are stuck on a road after being trapped by a mudslide on California Highway 58 in Mojave, California, Oct. 16, 2015, after torrential rains swamped the area and forced drivers and passengers to flee on foot.
Vehicles are stuck on a road after being trapped by a mudslide on California Highway 58 in Mojave, California, Oct. 16, 2015, after torrential rains swamped the area and forced drivers and passengers to flee on foot. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

It is believed everyone trapped in the mess got out safely, but emergency workers are double-checking.

As quickly as they found themselves stuck, getting unstuck is proving tedious for drivers as well.

Daniel Valentin finally got his car, but he is still haunted by what happened as he drove along Highway 58 with his family.

"My daughter's 8 years old. She freaked out really bad," he said. "She started screaming. 'Dad dad we're going to die!'"

While the Valentin's are now heading home, other drivers are waiting to hear what's next for the highway that appears frozen in time.

  • Mireya Villarreal

    Mireya Villarreal is a CBS News correspondent.