Demonstrations held for and against Trump across the U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Demonstrators were on the march Saturday from coast to coast. At rallies in Washington D.C. and Fountain Valley, California -- crowds applauded President Trump's decision this week to pull out of the Paris Climate Accord

Anti-Trump protesters took to the streets in New York and Denver - raising their voices for tougher investigations into Team Trump's relations with Russia.

This all comes days before fired FBI Director James Comey is scheduled to testify on Capitol Hill.

"Our first foreign trip was full of historic and unprecedented achievements," Mr. Trump said in his weeky address. 

Mr. Trump also said he looks forward to working with other world leaders following his trip overseas.

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Demonstration held in support of President Trump on June 3, 2017.

CBS News

"Joined by many old and new friends, we have paved the way for the new era of cooperation," Mr. Trump said.

But just days after returning to the U.S., he angered many world leaders by withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement.

"The United States will withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord," Mr. Trump said on Thursday. 

In Europe, Mr. Trump's decision was met with shock and dismay.

But the president did receive some support at home. On Saturday, supporters rallied outeside the White House to express thanks making good on a campaign promise. Some chanted "Pittsburgh, not Paris!" 

Mr. Trump has another potentially controversial decision to make this week -- whether to block former FBI Director James Comey from testifying before the Senate on Thursday.   

"I don't think there is a legitimate claim of executive privilege here," said Rep. Adam Schiff, who says he wants to hear Comey testify about any attempt to interfere in the Russia investigation. 

"I think the whole country needs to know whether the president was putting pressure on the director of the FBI to drop any part of the Russia investigation," Schiff says. 

But Sen. Lindsey Graham said on Fox News that he worries the Comey hearing could turn into a hit job on Mr. Trump.

"Here's what I worry about: That he'll just focus on his conversation with the president and not answer any other questions because of the investigation," Graham says. "That would be a hit job on President Trump."

Mr. Trump has the right to invoke his executive privilege to keep certain conversations private, but legal experts say he has undermined his legal case by tweeting about those conversations. Sources tell us the former FBI chief has not received any notification the president intends to block his testimony.