Crash Of $1M Car A Growing Mystery

A Los Angeles County sheriff inspects the remains of a rare $1.2 million Enzo Ferrari that crashed on Pacific Coast Highway Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2006, in Malibu, Calif.
AP Photo/Hanz Laetz
The mystery of the $1 million sports car continues to spin out new subplots and story lines.

The rare Ferrari Enzo that disintegrated in a spectacular crash last week was roaring along Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu at 162 mph when it hit a bump in the road, flew into the air and slammed into a telephone pole.

The apparent owner of the car, a 44-year-old Swede named Stefan Ericksson, told cops that he was a passenger at the time of the crash and that the driver — a German acquaintance he knew only as Dietrich — ran into the nearby hills.

A three-hour search failed to turn up any trace of "Dietrich." Ericksson escaped the crash with only a bloddy lip, and cops noted that the only blood in the car was found on the driver's side air bag. Eriksson's blood-alcohol level after the crash was .09, slightly more than the legal .08 limit.

The plot thickened this week as the Los Angeles Times reported that cops had recovered an ammunition magazine near the crash site that may be linked to the accident.

As if that weren't enough, a leading Scottish bank has told sheriff's investigators that it may own the destroyed car, which was one of only 400 made.

Sheriff's Sgt. Phil Brooks said Monday that detectives are trying to figure out why Scotland Yard in London listed as stolen another exotic car that Eriksson owns, a Mercedes SLR.

Sheriff's officials told the Times that Eriksson was an executive with a video game company that challenged industry giants like Sony and Nintendo. The company collapsed last year.

Eriksson has no comment on the case, according to the the security guard at his gated Bel-Air estate.