Average Super Bowl ticket price: $3,950

If you want to go to the Super Bowl, whether to root for the Seahawks or the Patriots or just to be there, it's going to cost you some fat dollars. The average list price to get a ticket to Super Bowl 49 in Glendale, Ariz., is $3,950, according to an analysis by ticket aggregator TiqIQ.com.

The asking price is down about 3 percent compared to last year, when the average price was $4,064. Average ticket asking prices at the same period before the big game were $3,083 in 2013, $3,646 in 2012, $4,062 in 2011, and $3,509 in 2010.

The highest priced tickets are listing for $17,800 and would put you in the lower center of the stadium. On the low end, if you'd consider it low, the cheapest seats are listing for $1,857, according to TiqIQ, which monitors and sells tickets from a variety of sources on the secondary market.

If you're thinking $1,800 or $18,000 is a drop in the bucket, then you could consider bumping up to a luxury box. Those are going for between $726,000 and close to $1 million.

But there's a big spread between what people are hoping to sell their tickets for and what fans are actually paying.

The average selling price for tickets sold so far this has been about $3,000, nearly $1,000 less than the average asking price.

And there is some evidence that indicates if you're willing to wait, while selection might be reduced, the asking prices will decline. Based on data since 2010, ticket prices to the Super Bowl tend to drop in the final two weeks.

Looking back at the five previous Super Bowls, here's what TiqIQ said were the average game ticket prices on the day of the game and lowest priced tickets available.

  • 2010- Saints v Colts: $2,329 ($1,379)
  • 2011- Packers v Steelers: $3,649 ($2,260)
  • 2012- Giants v Patriots: $2,956 ($1,354)
  • 2013- Ravens v 49ers: $2,199. ($1,062)
  • 2014- Seahawks v Broncos: $2,567 ($1,514)
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    Mitch Lipka is an award-winning consumer columnist. He was in charge of consumer news for AOL's personal finance site and was a senior editor at Consumer Reports. He was also a reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer and the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, among other publications.