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White House says Trump's State of the Union address will be "traditional"

D.C. eyes another shutdown deadline soon

Despite President Trump's colorful and at times bombastic remarks on Twitter and to reporters in recent weeks during the shutdown and debate on immigration, his State of the Union address will be "optimistic," "visionary" and somewhat "traditional," a senior administration official told reporters in a Friday briefing. 

Mr. Trump is delivering his first speech in the era of divided government Tuesday, after the annual address was rescheduled during the longest government shutdown in history. Mr. Trump himself said this week he thinks his speech will be one of unification — before in the same meeting with reporters in attendance, criticizing Democrats over border security. 

Comparing this speech to last year's, the senior administration official said, "I think this year will be similar, optimistic and unifying."

The official would not say whether Mr. Trump will declare a national emergency in his speech, as the president has hinted he might do if Congress can't agree to fund his border wall, and didn't say whether Mr. Trump will announce his next summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, as the president has also suggested he might do during the address. Mr. Trump told reporters Thursday the date and location for his second meeting with North Korea have been selected.

Here are some of the main themes and topics the president plans to address, according to that official:

  • Having a safe and legal immigration system
  • Protecting American workers
  • Updating congress on trading relationship with China
  • Calling on Congress to approve the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement
  • Calling on Congress to pass the U.S. Reciprocal Trade Act
  • Rebuilding America with an infrastructure package
  • Lowering the cost of health care and prescription drugs 
  • Bringing an end to "endless foreign wars"

Here is one excerpt from the president's prepared remarks: "Together, we can break decades of political stalemate. We can bridge old divisions, heal old wounds, build new coalitions, forge new solutions and unlock the extraordinary promise of America's future. The decision is ours to make."

The State of the Union will air on CBS at 9 p.m. Tuesday.