This week on "Sunday Morning" (February 17)

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Author Mary Calvi with correspondent Jim Axelrod, and a painting of Mary Philipse, the first love of Col. George Washington, and the subject of her historical romance, "Dear George, Dear Mary."

CBS News

Last Updated Feb 17, 2019 10:47 AM EST

WATCH THE FULL FEBRUARY 17 EPISODE!

      
COVER STORY:
The forgotten story of George Washington's love life | Watch Video
The familiar portrait of the father of our country is of the model of virtue and resolve who could not tell a lie. But author Mary Calvi says her research uncovered details about the first love of George Washington's life, the heiress Mary Philipse, one of the wealthiest women in the colonies, and how their relationship may not have ended once each of them was married to others. Jim Axelrod reports on the story behind "Dear George, Dear Mary," about the first president's first love.

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: Mary Calvi's "Dear George, Dear Mary"

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ALMANAC:
The Armory Show | Watch Video
On February 17, 1913, a landmark New York City exhibition presented nearly 1,400 works of avant-garde art, causing a furor among critics and the public. Jane Pauley reports. 

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Don Winslow with correspondent Jeff Glor in the desert abutting the U.S.-Mexico border, an area the novelist referred to as "The Big Nowhere." CBS News

BOOKS: Don Winslow on "The Border," both literary and political | Watch Video
After two bestselling novels set along America's Southern border, author Don Winslow thought he'd exhausted the topic of the drug trafficking trade. But there is more story to tell, inspired by President Trump's controversial plan to build a wall. Winslow talks with Jeff Glor about borders – ethical, moral, political – and whether, if we cross them, we can ever cross back.

READ A BOOK EXCERPT: Don Winslow's "The Border"

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Correspondent Lee Cowan with actress Melissa McCarthy, an Oscar-nominee for the film "Can You Ever Forgive Me?," at the Iliad Bookshop in North Hollywood, Calif. CBS News

"THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE …":  Melissa McCarthy on playing a literary grifter | Watch Video
Actress Melissa McCarthy enjoys studying people, whether it's for comedic performances, riotous impersonations, or the more dramatic role for which she's been nominated for an Academy Award, playing one of the most prolific literary forgers in history in "Can You Ever Forgive Me?" Lee Cowan talked with McCarthy about her portrayal of Lee Israel, the bestselling biographer who in her later years typed her way into a life of petty crime.

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A "love nut," a product of the Coco De Mer tree, which only grows on the Seychelles Islands. CBS News

ISLAND-HOPPING: The Seychelles Islands' unique "Love Nuts" | Watch Video
The Seychelles Islands, nearly a thousand miles off the eastern coast of Africa, are known for being a honeymoon hotspot. Part of the allure is a product of the Coco De Mer tree. Called "love nuts," these seeds are rare, large (weighing up to 30 pounds), shaped like a derriere, and are said to have aphrodisiacal properties. Conor Knighton visited the Seychelles, where a love of the love nut permeates island culture.

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HARTMAN:
A sign of the times (Video)
On Islington Road in Newton, Mass., lives two-year-old Samantha Savitz, who is deaf, but boy, does she love to talk to anyone who knows sign language. And if someone doesn't, that makes Sam just a little sad. Which led her neighbors to undertake what can only be described as a most generous community project: hiring an instructor, and fully immersing themselves in an American Sign Language class. Steve Hartman reports.

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Singer Dionne Warwick. CBS News

MUSIC: Dionne Warwick: A singular voice | Watch Video
In a career spanning six decades Dionne Warwick has been a part of our lives. She still performs at 78, and has a new album coming out this year. Mo Rocca sits down with the singer famous for such classics as "Walk On By," "I'll Say a Little Prayer," "That's What Friends Are For," and "Do You Know the Way to San Jose," a song she tells Rocca she hates.

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"MOBITUARIES":
 The unstoppable Sammy Davis Jr.
Mo Rocca's podcast explores the life and career of the man many consider the greatest entertainer of the 20th century.

You can download the episode on Apple PodcastsGoogle PlayMegaphoneStitcher, or Spotify on Friday, February 15. New episodes are available every week.

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PASSAGE:
"Sunday Morning" remembers (Video)
"Sunday Morning" notes three intriguing figures who left us this past week: Socialite, style icon and sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Lee Radziwill; perennial presidential candidate Lyndon LaRouche; and the Mars Opportunity Rover.

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Correspondent Faith Salie with curator Valerie Steele, at a recent Fashion Institute of Technology exhibition in New York City devoted to the color pink.  CBS News

COLORS: The colorful history of pink | Watch Video
Love it or hate it, pink is the most divisive color in American society, associated with gender stereotypes that leave some seeing red. After gaining favor in Europe as the preferred color for the fashionable and aristocratic, pink became linked with notions of sugar and spice and everything nice – and that's when businesses started seeing green. Faith Salie offers a history of pink, which has actually had quite a colorful life.

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COMMENTARY:
 Norman Ornstein on Trump's emergency declaration: A threat to our fundamental freedoms | Watch Video
A resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., and a contributing editor for the Atlantic, says that if the president can succeed with this voluntary state of emergency created to take funds for his border wall, he is setting the table for something much more dangerous.

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CALENDAR:
Week of February 18 | Watch Video
"Sunday Morning" takes a look at some notable events of the week ahead.

     
NATURE:
 Florida wildlife refuge (Extended Video)
"Sunday Morning" leaves us "in the pink" among the spoon bills and wood storks sharing the St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Videographer: Doug Jensen.

WEB EXCLUSIVES: 

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NATURE UP CLOSE: How birds' eyes are different from other vertebrates'
During millions of years of evolution, birds have developed many adaptations for flight, including in the avian eye.
       


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