Seahawks CBs Richard Sherman, Brandon Browner face 4-game bans for PEDs, CBSSports.com reports

Cornerback Richard Sherman #25 of the Seattle Seahawks looks for directions against the San Francisco 49ers in the first quarter on October 18, 2012 at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California.
Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty

Seattle Seahawks cornerbacks Richard Sherman and Brandon Browner face potential four-game suspensions for violating the NFL's policy on performance-enhancing drugs after both players tested positive for amphetamines on the same day in September, CBS Sports NFL Insider Jason La Canfora reports.

Sherman told Steve Wyche of the NFL Network that the stimulant Adderall - the drug that reportedly got he and Browner in trouble with the league -- is "something I have never done" and said he had not "taken anything."

The star cornerback also took to Twitter early Monday and said he was "not worried."

ESPN.com first reported Sunday afternoon that Seattle's starting cornerbacks had tested positive and were planning to appeal the suspensions. Neither player has had a date set for an appeal, according to La Canfora, and both players continue to deny taking any banned substances.

Earlier this season, cornerback Aqib Talib, who now plays for the Patriots, was banned four games for using Adderall while he was playing for the Buccaneers. Browns cornerback Joe Haden acknowledged last month that he tested positive for the stimulant, which also triggered a suspension.

A report in BuzzFeed last month suggested many NFL players have easy access to Adderall. NFL agent Jack Bechta, whose represents New York Giants safety Tyler Sash (one of a handful of NFL players who have tested positive for Adderall) said many players were unaware that the stimulant is banned by the league.

"I think it may be a case where a lot of guys have tested positive for Adderall got fined because they did not get an exemption [from the league]," Bechta told BuzzFeed. "I think if you look at the last several cases, most claimed and have proof they got the drug legally under a doctor's care and just didn't do the exemption form prior to using it. The pattern says that it's probably an education issue."