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Prince Harry headed to Vegas while in the U.S.?

Prince Harry may be known as the playboy prince, but when he touches down on U.S. soil this week, he will be headed to work - at least most of the time.

The third-in-line to the British throne - known as Capt. Harry Wales in the British Army Air Corps - will spend two intense months in Arizona and California flying the Apache attack helicopter.

However, during his time in the U.S., CBS News royal contributor Victoria Arbiter said Harry may have some time off to go to Las Vegas.

"Harry is committed to completing his training, but it has become something of a tradition for pilots in the program to take a half-way break to Vegas," she said. "We know Harry loves to party. ... Whether he goes remains to be seen, but I'm sure over the eight weeks, we're going to see Harry's fun side creep out."

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However, as CBS News military analyst Ret. Army Col. Jeff McCausland, explained on "The Early Show," Prince Harry is there first and foremost for work. Prince Harry, McCausland said, will go to the Gila Bend Auxiliary Air Field in Arizona for the supplemental, advanced training in the use of firepower associated with the Apache gunship.

He explained, "This will be done under, as best simulated combat situations as can occur, where he'll be flying in concert with other helicopters and he'll be responding to simulated calls for fire from ground troops, who would be engaged with the enemy and requiring air support."

Arbiter reported the course, code-named "Exercise Crimson Eagle," is the final stage in Apache pilot combat training. Harry has spent the last year learning to fly these potent assault vehicles.

"It's to give him the maximum, real-life combat experience as he might well encounter when he would go to Afghanistan," McCausland said.

Prince Harry served in Afghanistan in 2008, as a forward air controller, in which his duties included calling in air strikes and guaranteeing the accuracy of ground bombings. Harry has been vocal in his hopes to return to Afghanistan for active duty with his squadron next year, and with this round of training, that may be the next step.

"The terrain is about as close as one might encounter in Helmand Province, which is primarily where British forces have been operating in Afghanistan," McCausland said. "It should be remembered that Prince Andrew was, in fact a naval helicopter pilot, served in combat in Falklands. Prince William is an air-sea rescue helicopter pilot with the Navy and will be serving aboard ship and will be doing many dangerous operations recovering people at sea. So, it seems, in fact, he's following a rich military and flier tradition in the Royal Family."

Once Harry has completed his training in the U.S., he will join an Apache squadron and would be clear for deployment.

So will he be deployed again to Afghanistan?

Arbiter said on "The Early Show" that the British prime minister would ultimately make that decision.

"He served in 2007 into '08 and (he was) only there 10 weeks. He was supposed to be there four months, but his position there was rumbled and they had to pull him out," she said. "Ultimately, they've got to think about the safety of not just Prince Harry, but also his entire squadron. Obviously, he is a trophy prize for the enemy."

Arbiter said Prince Harry really wants to be deployed again. "It costs around a million pounds to train one of these pilots," she said. "Harry's point is, 'Why are you paying all of this to train me and putting all of this effort in if you're not going to send me?' He is considered one of the best pilots in his squadron. So if it's up to him, he'll be heading out."