Muslim cartoonist defends Charlie Hebdo

M.K. Perker is a Turkish cartoonist, and was a personal friend of one of the murdered French cartoonists, Georges Wolinski. That's why it hurt really, really bad.

"This one I think was right after 9/11," he said looking at some of his political cartoons, which talks about a security check.

Coming from a conservative Muslim family, Perker told us he would never draw cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed, but he defends the right of others to do so.

"There is no negotiation on freedom of speech," he said. "You can't bargain on this. You're either on this side or that."

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Despite objecting to the content of Charlie Hebdo, Turkish cartoonist M.K. Perker, a Muslim himself, believes in the newspaper's free speech rights. CBS News

His magazine, "Penguen," makes the same point on its latest cover. But the Turkish authorities disagree.

Last night, the police searched trucks distributing the Turkish version of the latest Charlie Hebdo.

Though Turkey is famous for its moderate form of Islam, the Turkish government only allowed the paper to go on sale today after confirming it did not include images of the Prophet Muhammad.

Violence, in the name of Islam, is all too familiar for many here in the Middle East. Far more Muslims have been killed by al Qaeda and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) than any other group.

But many Muslims believe that what they hold sacred is more important than free speech.

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Charlie Hedbo

Meryam Ilayda Atlas is a conservative Turkish commentator who told CBS News the west is partly responsible for what happened in Paris.

"These people are provoking some very high level of anger from all over the world," she said.

The new Charlie Hebdo cover - which depicts the Prophet Mohammed - has done just that. It's been banned from all websites here in Turkey. And it's been condemned by the Jordanian Foreign Minister and Egypt's top Islamic cleric, among others.