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Michael Jackson insiders describe death chaos

There's more testimony Thursday in the manslaughter trial of Michael Jackson's physician, Dr. Conrad Murray.

Murray took a verbal beating Wednesday. Prosecutors say Murray didn't know what to do the day Jackson died.

Special section: Conrad Murray trial

Members of the pop star's inner circle described a chaotic scene in Jackson's bedroom the day he died, CBS News national correspondent Ben Tracy reports. Dr. Conrad Murray, they said, was hunched over Jackson on the floor while his distraught children looked on.

Faheem Muhammad, head of security for Jackson, said in court, "Paris is on the ground, balled up, crying. And Prince, was just standing there, and he was just, he had a real shock, just slowly crying. Dr. Murray asked the question, 'Does anyone know CPR?'"

"The prosecution is trying to create in the jury is a sense that this is a doctor who had absolutely no idea what he was doing," says CBS News legal analyst Trent Copeland. "It's an emotional setting. The children are on the ground, they're crying. Dr. Murray is sweating, doesn't call 911."

Once Dr. Murray got to the hospital, there was no evidence he told anyone Jackson might have overdosed on the powerful anesthetic propofol. And what he did say, according to witnesses, was odd.

Michael Amir Williams, Jackson's personal assistant, said during testimony, "(Murray) said he was hungry. He hadn't eaten all day or night, something to that effect. And he wanted a ride to get some food."

Copeland says of Murray: "He sat there in a waiting room, rather than banging on the doors and telling the hospital personnel and the life-saving doctors who were working on Michael Jackson exactly what Michael Jackson had in his system."

Kathy Jorrie, a lawyer hired by concert promoter AEG, said in court that Murray told her "repeatedly" that Jackson was "perfectly healthy."

According to a lawyer connected to Jackson's canceled tour, Dr. Murray wanted an additional physician and a CPR machine on-hand once those concerts began. Evidence, observers say, that he may have known his propofol regimen was dangerous.

"Early Show" co-anchor Erica Hill adds a Jackson bodyguard is expected to testify that Murray asked him to hide propofol-related evidence before calling 911.