How does Trump’s approval rating look these days?

President Donald Trump speaks on his decision to shrink the size of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante national monuments, Mon., Dec. 4, 2017, in Salt Lake City.

AP

Between between the push for tax legislation, new developments in the Trump-Russia investigation, and some provocative moves on the world stage, it's been a busy few weeks for President Trump. So how does his approval rating look these days? Not great, according to a spate of recent polls – but not any worse than it has looked for much of the last few months.

Forty-three percent of registered voters said they approve of the president's job performance in an Economist/YouGov survey released Wednesday. Fifty-two percent said they disapprove.

In an Investor's Business Daily/TIPP poll also released Wednesday, 36 percent of Americans nationwide gave the president their approval, and 59 percent offered their disapproval.

In a Gallup poll released Wednesday, 36 percent of Americans said they approve of the job Mr. Trump is doing, while 59 percent disagreed.  

And on Tuesday, Quinnipiac University released their latest survey, which showed the president's approval rating at 35 percent among registered voters, and his disapproval rating at 58 percent.

None of those surveys reflect particularly well on Mr. Trump's political fortunes at the moment – but that has been the case for much of the past few months. The president's approval rating, while fairly deep underwater, has also been remarkably stable, which could point to a strong sense of loyalty among his remaining supporters.

As of Wednesday, the RealClearPolitics average of polls pegged the president's approval rating at 39.1 percent; that number has stayed between 37 percent and 42 percent since mid-May. And the RCP average put his disapproval rating average at 56.8 percent. That number has not dropped below 52 percent since the beginning of May.

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The Economist/YouGov survey polled 1,341 registered voters nationwide between December 3 and December 5, and it has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percent. The IBD/TIPP poll surveyed 901 Americans nationwide between November 27 and December 4, and it has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.3 percent. The Quinnipiac poll surveyed 1,508 registered voters nationwide between November 29 and December 4, and it has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percent. And Gallup's poll surveyed 1,500 Americans nationwide across a three-day window; it has a margin of error of plus or minus three percent.