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Holly Bobo search joined by paragliders

20-year-old Holly Bobo, a west Tennessee woman, was last reported seen being dragged from her home by a man dressed in camouflage in April of 2011.
Personal Photo
Paragliders have joined the search for Holly Bobo (above), a west Tennessee nursing student missing since April 13, 2011
Personal Photo

(CBS/AP) NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The search for missing Tennessee nursing student Holly Bobo took to the air this week thanks to a group of paragliders.

Pictures: Holly Bobo Missing

Dave Dubin, founder of Parasearchers.com, said Monday that a team of about five pilots searched on Sunday and again Monday morning around the home of Bobo near Parsons, Tenn., about 100 miles northeast of Memphis. Dubin said the group plans to resume searching later this week if weather permits.

The 20-year-old Bobo vanished April 13 after her brother said he saw her being led into woods by a man dressed in hunting camouflage. Hundreds of volunteers searched the heavily wooded area around the home in the weeks following her disappearance, but authorities have not

arrested anyone or identified a suspect. A small amount of blood was found outside the home.

Dubin told WJHL-TV in Johnson City that through power paragliding they can obtain clear aerial views of the woods where Bobo was last seen and can fly low and slow over the trees while searching for clues.

Dubin, who has a home in Johnson City, said Monday they didn't find anything of note during their search, but they can pinpoint areas using a GPS that may need a closer look.

"If we see something that we see is noteworthy, then we will mark it and go back on foot," Dubin said.

The group is working directly with Bobo's family, who pointed them to areas they wanted the paragliders to focus on, such as trailers hidden back in the woods. Dubin said the paragliders recorded their aerial flights with high-definition cameras and covered about 10 square miles during the two days of searching.

The challenge was the thick foliage of the wooded areas around Bobo's home, Dubin said, but they might have better luck when the leaves start to drop in the fall. His group relies on volunteers across the country and is a nonprofit that doesn't charge for missing persons cases.

Tips are still coming in to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation hotline, 1-800-TBI-FIND, although not as many as in the beginning of the investigation, spokeswoman Kristin Helm said on Monday.

Complete coverage of the Holly Bobo case on Crimesider