Alabama state rep. says we shouldn't arm teachers because they're women

Parkland students leading a movement

In response to calls from President Trump and lawmakers to arm educators, Alabama state Rep. Harry Shiver, a Republican, says that guns don't belong in the hands of teachers -- specifically "our ladies."

"I'm not saying all (women), but in most schools, women are (the majority) of the teachers," Shiver told AL.com in an interview March 15. "Some of them just don't want to (be trained to possess firearms). If they want to, then that's good. But most of them don't want to learn how to shoot like that and carry a gun."

Shiver's comments came in response to a bill that would designate special firearms-trained teachers and administrators at schools in Alabama. Shiver, a retired phys ed teacher himself, opposed the measure on the grounds that most women "are scared of guns," and should therefore not be expected to wield a firearm in the classroom.

The bill is headed to the Alabama State House for debate.

The conversation surrounding armed teachers began in response to the Parkland, Florida high school shooting that left 17 students dead on Feb. 14.

President Trump recently suggested potentially arming specially trained teachers in an effort to defend schools against shooters. During a White House listening session with state and local officials, Mr. Trump said that teachers who were trained and "adept at guns" could receive a bonus.

"We have to harden our schools, not soften them up. A gun-free zone to a killer or somebody that wants to be a killer, that's like going in for the ice cream. Like here I am -- take me," he said.

Just last week, a teacher in California who is also a reserve police officer accidentally fired a gun inside a classroom, slightly injuring one student.

Shiver doubled down on his opposition to the Alabama gun bill, according to NBC affiliate WSFA.

"We don't need to have a lady teacher in a school that's got a firearm," he said. "I taught for 32 years, and it's mostly ladies that's teaching and they get more things to worry about than a gun."