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8 homes of famous lovebirds

They say home is where the heart is, and this is especially true for many of history's famous lovers, whose homes remain as a reminder of their relationships.

From a musical power couple to a pair of outlaws on the run, the palaces, fortresses and hideouts of famous lovebirds help tell their stories.

This Valentine's Day, explore the homes of couples whose love captured the world's imagination.

Click ahead to see the homes of eight famous couples throughout history.

Ferdinand and Isabella, “the Catholic Monarchs”

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

During their reign, King Ferdinand II of Aragon and Queen Isabella I of Castile united the country of Spain, oversaw the infamous Spanish Inquisition and sent Christopher Columbus on the voyage that would earn the country recognition as a colonial power. This medieval power couple, though they were second-cousins, eloped against the diplomatic wishes of Isabella's brother, Henry IV, in 1469.

Ferdinand and Isabella, “the Catholic Monarchs”

Photo by Javicoves via Wikimedia Commons

The couple ruled as a team and in 1475, in Isabella's home at the Alcázar de Segovia, signed the Concord of Segovia outlining their respective duties in ruling their two kingdoms.

At least some sort of building existed on the spot of the Alcázar during the time the Romans controlled the Iberian Peninsula, but the first written record calling it a castle appeared between 1124 and 1139. It was renovated and expanded by a string of monarchs, and was used as everything from the royal residence to a state prison to a military college.

Today it's open as a tourist destination and includes tours of the palace, an artillery museum and the Tower of Juan II.

Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Shah Jahan, who ruled the then-Mughal Empire (which now includes most of India and Pakistan) from 1628 to 1658, is best known as the ruler who commissioned the Taj Mahal for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal.

The pair was engaged when Mahal was 14 and Jahan was 15 years old and married five years later. They had 14 children together, seven of whom survived into adulthood. The empress was the emperor's close adviser and confidante until her death during childbirth in 1631.

Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal

Photo by A.Savin via Wikimedia Commons

The couple lived -- along with Jahan's other wives -- at Agra Fort, a 94-acre fortress in the Indian city of Agra. Shah Jahan had many of the fort's red sandstone buildings destroyed to make way for buildings of white marble, the same material he used for his and Mahal's final resting place. The fort is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, although sections are still in use by the Indian military and inaccessible to the public.

John and Abigail Adams

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

As one of the Founding Fathers, America's first vice president and second president, John Adams relied heavily on the counsel of his wife, Abigail. The pair married in 1764 and had six children, four of whom lived to adulthood.

Throughout their relationship, they wrote over 1,000 letters to each other, many of which survive today and chronicle their relationship. During John's term as president, Abigail was so closely involved in her husband's decision-making that his rivals called her "Mrs. President."

John and Abigail Adams

Photo by User: Daderot via Wikimedia Commons

John and Abigail moved into their house at Peacefield in 1788. It was first built in 1731, and in 1800 the family greatly expanded it, doubling the size of the home with a large addition on the east end. It remained the Adams family residence until 1927.

It's now part of the Adams National Historic Park, where visitors can learn about the family and view hundreds of their possessions, books and letters.

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas

Photo via the New York Public Library

American writer Gertrude Stein met Alice B. Toklas in Paris in 1907 when Toklas arrived from San Francisco. Toklas became Stein's life partner, secretary and editor. The pair was known for hosting salons in their Paris apartment, which were attended by well-known artists and writers of the day, including Ernest Hemingway, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis and James Joyce.

In 1933, Stein wrote a book about Toklas, which she titled "The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas" as it was written from Toklas' point of view. It was Stein's best-selling work.

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas

Photo by David McSpadden via Wikimedia Commons

In 1910, Toklas moved into the apartment Stein shared with her brother at 27 Rue de Fleurus. The apartment was filled with the couple's art collection, which included pieces by Picasso, Matisse, Juan Gris, Paul Cézanne and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

The outlaw love story of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow continues to fascinate America more than 80 years after their deaths. Parker was 19 when she met Barrow, then 21, in January 1930. Barrow was arrested for burglary and sent to prison shortly thereafter.

He was released in 1932, and the pair went on the road to begin a life of crime together with the Barrow Gang. They were thought to be responsible for 13 murders and several kidnappings, auto thefts, burglaries and bank robberies by the time the couple was killed in a shootout with law enforcement in May 1934.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow

Photo by AbeEzekowitz via Wikimedia Commons

For about two weeks in 1933, starting April 1, the gang stayed in this two-bedroom apartment on 34th Street in Joplin, Missouri. Police raided the apartment on April 13 after getting reports of "suspicious behavior" on the property. Two officers were killed in the shootout, and the Barrow Gang escaped.

After the gang fled, police searching the apartment found undeveloped film containing the photos that made the couple famous: Bonnie and Clyde posing with guns in front of a car on the roadside.

In relatively recent years, the apartment was restored to its 1930s style and opened as a bed and breakfast. After a tornado struck Joplin in 2011, the owners converted it into a long-term rental due to a housing shortage in the area. It was listed for sale in April 2016 and sold in October 2016.

Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier III

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

American actress Grace Kelly met Prince Rainier III of Monaco in April 1955 when she joined the U.S. delegation at the Cannes Film Festival. Rainier traveled to America in December of that year, met Kelly's family and proposed in their Philadelphia home. They announced their engagement in January, and the Cinderella story of an American girl becoming European royalty made headlines.

A year after their first meeting, Kelly retired from acting and married the prince in April 1956 in a highly publicized ceremony dubbed the "Wedding of the Century." The couple had three children, Caroline, Albert and Stephanie. Kelly died in car crash in 1982, and Rainier never remarried.

Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier III

Photo by Kim via Flickr

The royal couple lived in the Prince's Palace, a fortress first built in 1191 on a cliff overlooking the Mediterranean. Monaco's current ruling family, the Grimaldis, has controlled the fort since 1297, and over the centuries they've renovated and remodeled it into a palace. It is still the home of Monaco's ruling prince, Albert II, and the opulent state apartments are open to tourists during the summer months.

Prince William and Kate Middleton

Pictures: Royal wedding ceremony Pictures: Kate Middleton's wedding dress AP Photo/Matt Dunham

The romance of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Kate Middleton has been a popular tabloid topic since the pair started dating and their wedding was watched live by millions around the globe, including almost 23 million Americans.

They met in 2001 when they were both students at St. Andrew's University and were rumored to be dating in 2003. Their relationship has been thoroughly covered by the media, including a brief breakup in 2007. The pair became engaged in October 2010 and married in April 2011. They have two children: Prince George, born in 2013, and Princess Charlotte, born in 2015.

Prince William and Kate Middleton

Photo by Richard Humphrey via Wikimedia Commons

The royal family now lives at Anmer Hall, a 10-bedroom country house in Norfolk that was gifted to them by Queen Elizabeth II (it's a short distance from her estate there). It was renovated in 2014 with a new conservatory, kitchen and roof. It also has a swimming pool and a private tennis court. The Duke and Duchess moved in after the birth of Princess Charlotte in 2015.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z

Jay Z and Beyonce attend the "China: Through The Looking Glass" Costume Institute Benefit Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2015, in New York City. Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Musical power couple Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Shawn "Jay-Z" Carter made headlines earlier this month when they announced via Instagram that they're expecting twins. The press-shy couple allegedly started dating after they collaborated on Jay-Z's song "'03 Bonnie and Clyde," but had known each other since at least the late 1990s. They quietly married in 2008.

Beyoncé announced she was pregnant with daughter Blue Ivy during her performance at the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards and gave birth in January 2012.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z

Photo courtesy of Zillow

In 2015, the couple purchased this unique mansion in New Orleans' Garden District. Originally a Presbyterian Church built in 1925, it was also a ballet school before it was turned into a private residence. It has seven bedrooms, eight bathrooms, stained glass windows and a rooftop garden with views of the Mississippi River and the SuperDome. The real estate listing asked $2.6 million in October 2014.

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