Report: US hostage freed in Somalia home tonight

Jessica Buchanan
AP Photo

Six days after being rescued by U.S. Navy SEALs from Somali pirates, American aid worker Jessica Buchanan will finally back in the U.S., ABC News reports.

"We're doing well as a family, and Jessica, we have not seen her yet -- so today's the big day," John Buchanan, Jessica's dad, told ABC. "We're all extremely excited about that. Obviously, I mean I can't really express it in words what it's going to be like to see her. ... We're just really looking forward to a great reunion."

Buchanan and her Danish colleague Poul Hagen Thisted had been held since October, and saw nine of their captors killed during their rescue.

After their rescue, Buchanan spent time on Sicily recuperating and being debriefed before flying home.

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"60 Minutes" correspondent Bob Simon, who spent 40 days in the hands of Iraqi captors during 1991's Persian Gulf War, described some of the sensations that Buchanan has likely been feeling since being freed Tuesday.

"The first few days you're ecstatic. You're free, you didn't think you were going to survive. It's pure ecstasy," he said on "CBS This Morning." "And then, reality sinks in. You don't really feel so good anymore. You're more fragile than you think you are at first."

John Miller said that the military, FBI and U.S. intelligence agencies now employ a three-phase process for reintegrating hostages into normal life - borrowed from protocols for prisoners of war that are now being used for civilians as well.

Phase one is the initial medical and psychological evaluation. Phase two is allowing for time to decompress where former captives can spend time with family and tell their story. Phase three is formulating an action plan to get back to normal life.

There is a lot of debate, meanwhile, over the possibility that Somali pirates or criminal groups might seek revenge for the successful raid.

There is another American currently being held in Somalia, a journalist, and a spokesman for the pirates claims they moved him three times immediately following the raid that rescued Buchanan and her Danish colleague Poul Thisted.

In total, there are almost 160 foreigners being held by Somali pirates at the moment, and it's a real concern that there could be violent retaliation against them if there is another raid to rescue hostages.