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Additional pig-ear dog treats recalled in 27-state salmonella outbreak

  • Another company is recalling pig ears due to possible salmonella contamination, saying it knows of two dogs who became ill after eating its treat. 
  • A multi-state outbreak of salmonella infections tied to pig ears sold as dog treats has expanded since Pet Supplies Plus recalled the product earlier this month, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
  • At least 93 people from 27 states have now been stricken with the bacteria, with 20 of them hospitalized. 

A second company is recalling pig ears purchased as dog treats as federal and state officials investigate an outbreak of salmonella infections that has sickened 93 people in 27 states, including 20 hospitalizations.

The recalled products were shipped nationwide to distributors and retail stores from May 1, to July 3, 2019, according to the Lennox Group, the U.S. arm of which is based in Edison, New Jersey. The company manufactures its bovine chews and other high-end pet products in South America, with its meat coming from European Union suppliers under U.S. Department of Agriculture supervision, according to its web site. Lennox sells its products under the Rawhide Express brand in the U.S., Canada and the Middle East, and under the Bravo brand in Europe.

The product comes in an eight-package branded pouch bearing the UPC codes 742174 995163 or 742174994166.  Also being recalled: individually shrink-wrapped packages with one of the following UPC codes: 0385384810 or 742174935107. All UPC codes are located on the front label of the package. Lennox knows of two cases of its pig ears causing dog illnesses, the company stated.

The company expanded its recall later in the week, with that information found here.

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Recalled product The Lennox Group

Since Pet Supplies Plus in early June recalled bulk pig ears sold at more than 400 stores in 33 states, another 48 illnesses have been reported, bringing the total count of known infections to 93, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said in an update last week. When the retail chain posted its recall, the outbreak involved 45 illnesses in 13 states. 

The CDC and the Food and Drug Administration are investigating contaminated pig ears, with evidence pointing to contact with the dog treats as the likely source of the outbreak.

Salmonella can affect animals eating contaminated products as well as the humans who handled the sickened animals or the infected product. In people, the salmonella infection causes symptoms including nausea, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever; in rare cases, it can cause more serious ailments. Affected pets may become lethargic and have diarrhea, fever and vomiting. 

"Testing by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development revealed that aging bulk pig-ear product in one of our stores tested positive for salmonella," Pet Supplies said. "We have pulled bulk pig-ear product from the shelves of all of our stores and have stopped shipping bulk pig ears from our distribution center."

Bulk pig ears were distributed to Pet Supplies Plus stores in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

FDA investigating possible link between dog food and heart disease

Consumers who purchased bulk pig ears should throw them away. (Anyone with further questions can call (734) 793-6564 Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to  4 p.m. Eastern time, Pet Supplies said.)

The recall is among several recent health concerns regarding what pets eat, with the FDA recently identifying 16 brands of dog food more frequently connected to a spike in canine heart disease.

A separate outbreak of salmonella infections linked to backyard poultry flocks has sickened 768 people from 48 states, including 122 people who were hospitalized and two deaths, one in Ohio and one in Texas, the CDC said. 

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