Would you pay six figures for "world's most expensive" sundae?

Three Twins Ice Cream in Petaluma, California, says it sells the "world's most expensive" sundae.

Three Twins Ice Cream

This ice cream treat is sure to deliver brain freeze -- from the sticker stock.

Three Twins Ice Cream in Northern California's Bay Area is serving up what it calls "the world's most expensive ice cream sundae."

Start with three scoops of organic ice cream, add an organic banana and then bathe in a trio of syrups made from rare -- and expensive -- dessert wines: a vintage Port from the 1960s; a fabled Chateau D'yquem from the Sauternes region of southwestern France; and a German Trockenbeerenauslese, known for the "noble rot" that oenophilic dreams are made of.

The decadent confection is served with an antique spoon from the 1850s, as a cellist provides musical accompaniment to soothe the digestion -- and perhaps distract from what comes after the final spoonful: the check. The sundae will run you exactly $3,333.33, a play on the company's name.

Three Twins owner Neal Gottlieb notes that the sundae, while actually on the menu, is a lighthearted way to promote the company's brand, not appeal to the gluttony of tech billionaires or other plutocrats who live in the area. He also acknowledges that wine lovers might consider pouring a Premier Cru over ice cream "sacrilegious." After all, a 2005 D'yquem retails for $625.

Gottlieb, 38, opened Petaluma, California-based Three Twins in 2005 after a stint in the Peace Corps and several years working for The Gap. Life in retail "just wasn't for me -- I make a terrible employee," he quipped. "Building my own brand really suits me well."

The world's most expensive sundae is also a way to give back to the local community, with a third of the purchase price going to a non-profit group in Napa Valley that works to protect local land.

Gottlieb concedes he has yet to get any takers for the $3,333.33 sundae. "This is obviously tongue-in-cheek and meant to give people something to look at other than staring at the menu," he said.

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    Alain Sherter covers business and economic affairs for CBSNews.com.