Trump hurls insults at Clinton, calls debate bathroom break "disgusting"

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. -- It was a rally that would be unlikely with any other presidential candidate in recent history.

GOP frontrunner Donald Trump hurled a number of off-color insults at Democratic frontrunner, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Trump's last rally before Christmas in Grand Rapids, Michigan, was lively, but was marred by protesters, who interrupted the speech more than a dozen times. It was the most a Trump rally has been interrupted during the election cycle so far.

A sampling of the rally: Trump called Clinton "disgusting" for using the restroom during the last Democratic debate. He also said that Clinton got "schl****d" in the 2008 election.

He vowed not to kill any journalists, but made sure to mention that he still hates them.

Trump spent the day demanding an apology from Clinton for claiming that videos of him were being used to recruit ISIS members. Clinton's team has backtracked, saying that Trump has been mentioned on social media.

In response, Brian Fallon, Hillary's spokesperson, said, "Hell no. Hillary Clinton will not be apologizing to Donald Trump for correctly pointing out how his hateful rhetoric only helps ISIS recruit more terrorists."

Trump's criticisms started out mildly enough -- for Trump standards.


"She's a liar," Trump said, referring to Clinton's debate claim. "It turned out to be a lie."

But later, Trump turned up the temperature, saying that Clinton was "disgusting" for using a restroom during a commercial break of a debate.

"I know where she went," Trump said. "It's disgusting. I don't want to talk about it. It's too disgusting. Don't say it. It's disgusting. Let's not talk, we want to be very, very straight up, OK?"

Later in the speech, Trump used an off-color word to describe how Clinton was defeated by President Barack Obama in the 2008 election.

"Even a race to Obama, she was gonna beat Obama," Trump said. "I don't know who would be worse, I don't know, how could it be worse? But she was going to beat, she was favored to win and she got schl****d, she lost, I mean she lost."

When the topic turned to Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump referenced allegations that Putin has had journalists killed.

"And then they said you know he's killed reporters," Trump said. "And I don't like that. I'm totally against that."

But rest assured, Trump still had harsh words for the media in the room.

"I hate some of these people, but I'd never kill them. I hate them," he said.

His supporters, such as 45-year-old Matt Vanheulen, liked what they heard.

"I know that the credibility of the journalists in American and across the world has really been damaged by their own bias over the last 30 to 40 years," Vanheulen said. "It's fairly clear the American public is kind of over it. So him using that as a political tool is smart."

Trump handled the interruptions by protesters in various ways -- sometimes with peace in mind, referring to them as "nonviolent" and other times with insults.

After one interruption, Trump said, "What a bunch of losers. You really are a loser."

Another interruption was from a high-pitched woman, to which Trump said, "That's a very weak voice."

To another, Trump said, "He's holding up his hands like Mike Tyson. He'd never throw a punch."

It's that brash style that continues to endear him to massive and unmatched crowds throughout the country.

"Well, he uses words differently than I would but many of his principles is what I'm concerned in," said 77-year-old Harold Voorhees, a county commissioner and Trump supporter. "I'm concerned in a person who says America is going to be first, which I'm concerned is not the way of the present governments in Washington DC."

Trump will commence early state swing after the holidays, with visits to New Hampshire, Iowa and South Carolina before the New Year.