CBSN

"Data, A Love Story" by Amy Webb

Dutton, Brian Woolf
Data, A Love Story, Amy Webb
Dutton, Brian Woolf

Jeff Glor talks to Amy Webb about, "Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Online Dating to Meet My Match."

Jeff Glor: What inspired you to write the book?

Amy Webb: There are millions of men and women who are stuck in the cycle of bad dates. Many of them assume that they'll never find the right partner, and the longer they stay on dating sites, the more despondent they feel. I want those folks to know that it's just a matter of taking more control of their situations. Online dating sites can work very well, as long as you know how to really use them. My book is my personal journey through heartbreak, dating and love, but it also provides some concrete, practical tips on how to create your own system to find the right person and how to relaunch your own personal, digital brand online.

JG: What surprised you the most during the writing process?

AW: I treated this book as a reported story, which meant that I spent countless hours scouring old original notes, spreadsheets and chat transcripts. I also talked at length with my dad and sister to recreate the conversations we had when the book takes place. It's always fascinating to look back at a moment in your own personal history. I caught my current self cringing numerous times at my former self, and wondering how I didn't see things more clearly then.

JG: What would you be doing if you weren't a writer?

AW: Well, I wear many hats. I'm the CEO of Webbmedia Group, which is a digital strategy agency that solves complex strategic and operational problems related to disruptive technologies and emerging digital trends that are catalyzing great change across many industries. I'm also the co-founder of Spark Camp, which is an invite-only gathering of super-smart, hyper-creative people that aims to think big thoughts and solve problems around bunch of central themes. I judge a bunch of industry awards, sit on boards of directors and I'm affiliated with a few universities doing research. If I was able to add a discipline to that, like a fantasy gig, I'd love to lead a rock star analytics and digital outreach teams for the next presidential election cycle.

JG: What else are you reading right now?

AW: I have a Ben Franklin obsession, and I'm in the process of devouring Walter Isaacson's biography "Benjamin Franklin: An American Life." I cannot put it down. I spent six full hours reading it on two flights this week. Up next will be "Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain" by David Eagleman. Every week, I usually read New York magazine cover to cover, and most of the New Yorker, Time magazine and The Week. I also regularly read the MIT Technology Review. I have about 50 RSS feeds that I scan through every morning before I start my day: Mashable, ArsTechnica, New York Times, Wall Street Journal and the like. And I'll be totally honest: I have a subscription to both Us Weekly and Star.

JG: What's next for you?

AW: My team has a very big year ahead of us at work. We're in the process of growing our client portfolio and expanding our offerings, and as a result we have lots of new projects on the books. Aside from my day job, I do have another book in mind, about the myth women have been sold about working hard, starting families later and attempting to have it all.

For more on "Data, A Love Story" visit her website.